• NGAATJATJARRA, NGAANYATJARRA, PITJANTJATJARA ELIZABETH MARRKILYI ELLIS, INGE KRAL

    WESTERN DESERT SPECIAL SPEECH STYLES PROJECT
    In the Australian Western Desert Aboriginal people use a rich repertoire of special speech styles incorporating speech, song, sign language, gesture and drawing. These speech styles, used in secular and ceremonial contexts, are a highly valued yet endangered part of the traditions of desert people. This project will take a multidisciplinary approach to the documentation of verbal art forms from the Western Desert family of languages – specifically Ngaanyatjarra, Ngaatjatjarra and Pitjantjatjara – spoken by approximately 2000 people in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands region of south-east Western Australia. The collection provides a significant record of these oral practices and a rich data sets for analyses that enhances our understandings of how multimodal communication systems work across Australian desert communities. It also sheds light on the relationship between traditional multimodal communication forms and multimodal computer mediated communication.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ab3b8857-4f9c-4e42-a938-8ec7b981c0fe

    Western Desert Special Speech Styles Project
  • TUYUKA NATHALIE PIRES VLCEK

    DOCUMENTATION OF BRAZILIAN TUYUKA, BRAZIL
    Tuyuka is an Eastern Tukano language spoken by approximately one thousand people distributed in some twenty communities in Brazilian and Colombian territories in northwestern Amazonia.This collection shows a number of videos and audios that come from vocabulary list elicitations (as Swadesh) to natural spoken community gathers. The elicitations have served for a large phonetic and phonological investigation, and the natural spoken acts are still to be fully analysed. There are, also sessions with rich stories and diverse participants, such as narratives and procedurals. All transcriptions were made with the community members as protagonist participants and more than Four workshops were developed within the community to engage as many members as possible.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/07536cb4-8853-4067-9377-cdfbaae80322

  • KOTIRIA (WANANO), WA’IKHANA (PIRATAPUYO) KRISTINE STENZEL

    GRAMMAR AND MULTILINGUAL PRACTICES THROUGH THE LENS OF EVERYDAY INTERACTION IN TWO ENDANGERED LANGUAGES IN THE EAST TUKANO FAMILY
    Over 200 hours of raw data was collected between July 2017 and December 2019 by linguists Kristine Stenzel, Nicholas Williams, and members of indigenous documentation team. Corpus recordings were made in a variety of sites, including the Kotiria villages of Caruru Cachoeira, Jutica, and Taracuá, in collaboration with the Khumuno W?’? Kotiria indigenous school. Recordings were also made in the Wa’ikhana village of Aracú Porto, in Iauaretê, a larger, ethnically mixed village, and in the city of São Gabriel da Cachoeira, where many Kotiria and Wa’ikhana families have relocated. In all, some 200 members of the Wa’ikhana and Kotiria language communities took part in project activities and appear in corpus recordings. The deposited materials include approximately 60 hours of recordings, transcribed and translated into Portuguese in ELAN by indigenous team members Auxiliadora Figueiredo (Kotiria) and Edgar Cardoso (Wa’ikhana). English translations are in progress.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1802b908-7d02-4285-b514-6da8924ad40a

  • CHA PALAA CONNIE DICKINSON

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHA’PALAA
    This collection documents the culture and language of the Chachi (Cayapa), an indigenous group located in the northwestern corner of Ecuador. Cha’palaa, the language of the Chachi, is a lesser described member of the under-documented Barbacoan language family. The documentation project has pursued three primary, inter-related goals: the compilation of ethnographic and linguistic information based on video recordings, the compilation of an electronic dictionary database and descriptive grammar, and finally the production of materials for use by the speech community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/02194d45-4c43-49f1-a553-5948e45a2963

  • COFáN SCOTT ANDERBOIS

    KOFáN COLLABORATIVE PROJECT: COLLECTION OF AUDIO-VIDEO MATERIALS AND TEXTS
    Cofán (con) is a linguistic isolate spoken by approximately 1,000 people in eastern Ecuador and Colombia in communities near the San Miguel and Aguarico rivers. This project focuses on the varieties spoken on the Aguarico river, by collecting, transcribing, and analyzing video and audio in a range of contexts and genres in collaboration with community members. The material will be archived with ELAR and also made available to community members in a flexible computer-based interface under development in tandem with the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2584a6a9-492c-48e7-a2af-3001adeb9ebf

    Kofán Collaborative Project: Collection of Audio-Video Materials and Texts
  • SECOYA ANNE SCHWARZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF ECUADORIAN SECOYA
    This collection represents speakers of Ecuadorian Secoya. The two major Secoya communities in Ecuador are Siecoya Remolino (latitude –0.39550, longitude –75.66559) and San Pablo de K’antëtsiaya (latitude –0.25612, longitude –76.42227). Most of the Ecuadorian Secoya speakers live along the Aguarico river in the Sucumbíos province, very few also live (temporarily) in other places and the capital Quito. A few individuals have also stayed in nearby Colombia in the past.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e24596f2-b335-421b-b7ea-46e029d6f18e

  • OKIEK JANE AKINYI NGALA ODUOR

    A PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION OF THE OKIEK LANGUAGE OF KENYA
    This is a preliminary Okiek language documentation project. Okiek is one of the languages in the Kalenjin macrolanguage (Ethnologue). According to the Kenya Population Census of 2009, the Okiek number 76,000. They live scattered in Kuresoi, Narok South and in the region of Mt. Elgon and are also found in Tanzania. The Okiek generally, and especially those of Tinet (Kuresoi South where the documentation will take place), are eager to preserve their language and culture even though the existence of linguistic diversity around them and the socio-ecomomic changes in their way of life hinder this. Okiek is a highly endangered so far unwritten minority language. The project therefore documents not only the Okiek language and its structure but also its cultural, social and political dimensions (as recommended by Bowern (2011) for highly endangered languages) by audio and video recording conversations, songs, narratives, poems, proverbs and ceremonies associated with circumcision, bee keeping, etc. A good part of the audio / visual corpus obtained will be annotated and transcribed. It will be translated into English which is one of the official languages of Kenya.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/617a1adf-d5b1-4925-baae-3f90c4cf33bd

    A preliminary documentation of the Okiek language of Kenya
  • MYENE MARK VAN DE VELDE

    COMPARATIVE DOCUMENTATION OF THE MYENE LANGUAGE CLUSTER
    The comparative documentation of the Myene language cluster is a large and diverse set of recorded (audio and video) and transcribed communicative events, a lexicological database and a grammar sketch documenting the six varieties of the Myene language cluster (MYE), viz. Enenga, Adyumba, Mpongwe, Orungu, Galwa and Nkomi.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/343e987c-aa88-426d-89ee-f4699ef38d43

  • AMBEL LAURA ARNOLD

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF AMBEL, AN AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF EASTERN INDONESIA
    Ambel is an undocumented Austronesian language spoken in the Raja Ampat archipelago in West Papua, Indonesia. There are an estimated 300 speakers. Younger generations are no longer learning the language, and Papuan Malay, the local lingua franca, is increasingly used as the language of everyday communication in traditionally Ambel-speaking villages. The aim of this project is to build an extensive audio-visual archive of Ambel, representative of a wide variety of genres. This corpus will form the basis of a grammatical description of Ambel for submission as a PhD dissertation, as well as a trilingual lexicon (Ambel-Indonesian-English).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/32310ee5-1136-4db3-a2fd-89ecf8dd7bf7

    The documentation of Ambel, an Austronesian language of Eastern Indonesia
  • UPPER NAPO KICHWA KAROLINA GRZECH

    UPPER NAPO KICHWA: DOCUMENTATION OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    The deposit is a result of a documentation project of Upper Napo Kichwa language and culture, funded by ELDP between 2012-2015. The project was a collaborative effort of a linguist and a group of native-speaker researcher who were involved in the design of the deposit content as well as in the collection, transcription and translation of the data. The deposited data encompasses a wide variety of genres and topics and contains large amount of interactions between native speakers, all of which have been recorded on video, as well as audio. The only part of the corpus which was recorded on audio only are certain grammatical elicitations. The information about all the sessions, as well as topics and keywords, are available both in Spanish and English..
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/884f9353-ea4c-4686-b83c-18cdb828193c

    Upper Napo Kichwa: documentation of language and culture
  • YUHUP LORENA ORJUELA, REBECA ORTIZ ÁLVAREZ

    DOCUMENTATION AND SOCIOPHONETIC DESCRIPTION OF THE VARIETIES OF YUHUP SPOKEN IN COLOMBIA
    This project documents the Yuhup spoken in Colombia. The documentation consists of a corpus of a wide range of genres. The focus is on sociocultural practices. The project also offers a doctoral thesis on the phonetics of tones and glottalization, and two undergraduate dissertations. One on the creation of thematic dictionaries and another on complex lexical units. This project is a collaborative effort of Lorena Orjuela (University of Texas at Austin), Doris Fagua (University of Cartagena), two Colombian undergraduate students who work under the supervision of Dr. Fagua and Lorena Orjuela, and 4 Yuhup from Bocas de Ugá.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/81d23871-2f35-4f55-8935-f041a4da27a0

    Documentation and sociophonetic description of the varieties of Yuhup spoken in Colombia
  • TUNGURAHUA (CHIBULEO) KICHWA KAROLINA GRZECH, SELENA TISELMA SHACA

    ENDANGERED ORAL TRADITIONS OF KICHWA-SPEAKING ECUADOR: COLLABORATIVE DOCUMENTATION OF CHIBULEO KICHWA
    This deposit is a result of a collaborative documentation of Chibuleo Kichwa, based largely on remote fieldwork. The elicitation sessions were conducted on Zoom video-conferencing software, and the on-site recordings in Ecuador were conducted by Selena Tisalema Shaca, the deposit’s co-author and native speaker of Chibuleo Kichwa who also acted as the main language consultant for the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b2b1312f-f3ad-4d01-9248-5e726d72bd0b

  • YUCUNA MAGDALENA LEMUS SERRANO

    A PRELIMINARY LINGUISTIC SURVEY OF YUCUNA, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF COLOMBIA
    This project aims at documenting Yucuna (ISO 639-3: ycn), a definitely endangered North Amazonian Arawakan language spoken in Colombia by approximately 1.800 persons. A corpus of transcribed audio recordings will be produced with the help of community members living around the Miriti-Parana River. This study will constitute the basis for a more comprehensive project whose ultimate aim is to produce a grammatical description as well as a literacy handbook to be used in a community-owned education program.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7a4d88da-f9a6-4bf2-8fc8-e26424d38249

  • KONDA YUSUF SAWAKI

    DOCUMENTING KONDA: AN ENDANGERED AND LESS-KNOWN TRANS-NEW GUINEA LANGUAGES OF SOUTH BIRD’S HEAD OF NEW GUINEA
    Konda and Kais are Trans-New Guinea languages of South Bird's Head of New Guinea that have less than 1,000 speakers. These two languages are undescribed and are threatened and endangered as young speakers prefer to speak Papuan Malay and Bahasa Indonesia in daily basis rather than their native languages due to social, economic and political factors. In daily life, most speakers in villages are still depend their life on sago plants and many traditional stories relate to sago including their presence of their ancestors in the region. Thus, documenting stories around sago forest is essential.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5d2e4f28-003d-4c64-82eb-fd6bb77e1583

  • WAO TERERO CONNIE DICKINSON, UBOYE GABA, NEMO NENQUIMO, MERY NENQUIHUI

    WAORANI DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    The collaborative Wao Terero documentation project conducted from 2010-2017 provided a comprehensive documentation collection of the still unclassified language and culture of the approximately 2,000 Waorani living in the Amazonian region of Ecuador. The collection consists of transcribed and translated video recordings covering a wide variety of cultural practices and discourse genres ranging from traditional ceremonies and practices to everyday conversation as well as a preliminary lexical database and grammatical sketch. The results of this project are of interest not only to academics but also to the Waorani who have a keen interest in documenting their culture.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/91ada6b7-5413-4846-9d8f-5423271ed5aa

    Waorani Documentation Project
  • WESTERN PANTAR GARY HOLTON

    ENRICHING THE MEDIA CORPUS FOR WESTERN PANTAR (LAMMA), A PAPUAN OUTLIER LANGUAGE OF EASTERN INDONESIA
    Western Pantar is a Papuan language spoken by approximately 10,000 people on the western portion of Pantar Island, in the Alor Archipelago of East Nusa Tenggara province, Indonesia. Though often referred to in the literature as Lamma, that label more properly denotes just one of three primary dialects of Western Pantar, along with Tubbe and Mauta. Materials in this deposit are primarily from the Tubbe dialect spoken in the vicinity of the village of Puntaru and surrounding area.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0ae6b418-16f8-46a3-803d-3b132d674f2c

    Enriching the media corpus for Western Pantar (Lamma), a Papuan outlier language of Eastern Indonesia
  • ÄIWOO ÅSHILD NæSS

    DOCUMENTING ÄIWOO, THE LANGUAGE OF THE REEF ISLANDS
    The deposit consists of audio and video materials in the Oceanic language Äiwoo. The materials were recorded in September-October 2015 in eight villages in the Reef Islands: Otelo, Nyimââ, Laato and Nyiväle on Lomlom island, and Tuwo, Malubu, Tängä and Malapu on Fenua Loa (Ngäsinuwe) island. The materials focus on traditional life and culture in the Reef Islands and cover topics such as fishing, gardening, house building, food preparation, basket weaving, tattooing, politeness and avoidance, traditional medicine, childbirth, burial practices, marriage practices, maturation ceremonies for children and traditional village governance. There are also some traditional myths and morality tales (‘kastom stories’) as well as stories of personal experiences. The data was collected by Åshild Næss, linguist and principal investigator, with the assistance of native speaker Luke Gitakulu who appears as an interviewer in many of the recordings. In addition to video and audio materials, the deposit includes a freely downloadable dictionary prepared as part of the project and published by Asia-Pacific Linguistics.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/88239c3d-d922-4327-afe3-6750004c5ae7

    Documenting Äiwoo, the language of the Reef Islands
  • DHAO JEREMY BALUKH

    DOCUMENTATION OF DHAO
    This project documents folk tales and procedural texts in Dhao. This project produces a text collection with a glossary of Dhao-Indonesian. Dhao is one of the Austronesian languages spoken in the Dhao and Nuse islands near the western part of Roti Island, Indonesia. This project was funded by the Endangered Language Fund (ELF), New Haven, CT, USA for the period of July 2008 to June 2009. The host of this project is the Agape Indah Language and Culture Center, Kupang, Indonesia.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4ef3658c-c9c7-4a26-8d42-744dcabada3f

    Documentation of Dhao
  • NALöGO VALENTINA ALFARANO

    DOCUMENTING NALöGO, AN OCEANIC LANGUAGE OF SANTA CRUZ ISLAND
    Nalögo is an Oceanic language spoken on Santa Cruz Island in Temotu, the esternmost province of Solomon Islands. The last census in 2007 reports approximately 1620 speakers of Nalögo. A number of pressures, especially the great expansion of Solomon Pijin, are leading to rapid changes in patterns of language use and transmission. The project will expland on the limited documentation materials available for Nalögo. Digital audio and video materials covering different genres will be collected, transcribed and translated. In agreement with the speakers, a short collection of texts or a Nalögo-English wordlist will be produced.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e8eb6ff8-f7e5-4953-95d7-397e831b2ace

    Documenting Nalögo, an Oceanic language of Santa Cruz Island
  • CHàCOBO ADAM TALLMAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHáCOBO-PACAHUARA, SOUTHERN PANOAN LANGUAGES OF THE NORTHERN BOLIVIAN AMAZON
    Chacobo is a southern Panoan language, spoken in the northern Bolivian Amazon in the department of Beni. Estimates of the number of contemporary speakers vary between 800 and 1200. The vitality of the language is strong in remote areas, however, the interaction with surrounding regional economies has intensified resulting in a generation of children who are not learning the language in certain areas. Documentation of the language is thus urgent. The outcome of this project will be 50 hours of video and audio recordings, 10 hours of which will be transcribed and translated in ELAN, and annotated in FLEX. 3 field trips will be undertaken, totally 18 months in the field. The main output will be an extensive documentary corpus and a fairly comprehensive reference grammar of the Chacobo language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d737e733-a0ea-462b-8d4f-2e7c0ecd6e9e

    Documentation of Chácobo-Pacahuara, southern Panoan languages of the northern Bolivian Amazon
  • ORO WIN JOSHUA BIRCHALL

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE ORO WIN LANGUAGE
    The Oro Win language (ISO-639 orw, -11.088, -64.078) is an underdescribed and severely endangered member of the Chapacuran family. It is spoken by six elders living along the headwaters of the Pacaás Novos River in the Brazilian state of Rondônia. This collection contains language materials recorded with the six Oro Win-speaking elders, and includes audio and video recordings of Oro Win speech from a variety of discourse genres, which have been used to help develop practical language materials with the community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/60c751ef-ded1-420f-9dfe-681794954b8d

  • SHARANAHUA, YAMINAHUA, NAHUA KELSEY CAITLYN NEELY

    MULTIDIALECTAL LEXICAL DOCUMENTATION OF YAMINAHUA, NAHUA, AND SHARANAHUA
    This project documents dialectal variation in Yaminahua, Nahua, and Sharanahua, three Panoan languages that form part of a large dialect complex extending across western Brazil, eastern Peru, and northeastern Bolivia. This project documents the four primary varieties spoken in Peru: Yaminahua of the Sepahua river, Yaminahua of the Yurúa river, Nahua (Yora), and Sharanahua. The total speaker population for all varieties is under 1400, and the speaker communities are geographically dispersed and largely shifting to Spanish. This project focuses on the documentation of migration and contact histories and linguistic attitudes toward variation, particularly lexical and phonological variation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0fef926e-01e8-4f44-910f-371fb5905ff7

    Multidialectal lexical documentation of Yaminahua, Nahua, and Sharanahua
  • AMURDAK ROBERT MAILHAMMER

    DOCUMENTATION OF AMURDAK, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN ARNHEM LAND (AUSTRALIA)
    Amurdak is an endangered language traditionally spoken in Northern Arnhem Land, Northern Australia (ISO code amg). Although Amurdak was traditionally spoken in the stone country of Northern Arnhem Land (around Gunbalanya near Oenpelli, Northern Territory, see Mailhammer et al. 2009)), as far as it is known, all remaining speakers and many Amurdak-affiliated people live in the community Minjilang on Croker Island, just off the coast of Northern Arnhem Land. Despite being geographically removed from the traditional language area, the consultants for this project possess a deep and substantial knowledge of Amurdak country and its people. This extends e.g. to significant locations and relevant flora and fauna. The collection includes texts from as wide a range of genres as possible, as part of a more comprehensive documentation project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c665f2d7-8928-4034-857e-a1bfc15b3a34

  • CAQUINTE (ARAWAK) ZACHARY O'HAGAN

    AN AUDIOVISUAL CORPUS OF CAQUINTE (ARAWAK)
    Caquinte [ISO 639-3: cot] is a Nijagantsi (aka Kampan) Arawak language spoken by 300-400 people in Peruvian Amazonia. It is losing ground to neighboring and related Ashaninka and Matsigenka, with many residents of Caquinte communities speaking one of these latter two languages, or code-switching among them. This project responds to the urgent situation of Caquinte by documenting and describing the language via the expansion of an extant corpus, with a focus on the relation of textual material to regional flora, fauna, and topological features. Products include a written and audiovisual corpus, draft dictionaries, and a PhD dissertation, "Focus in Caquinte" (O'Hagan 2020).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/035e6e40-66af-4897-86f6-5a9ad026606b

    An Audiovisual Corpus of Caquinte (Arawak)
  • ESE EJJA MARINE VUILLERMET

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE ESE EJJA LANGUAGE OF THE AMAZONIAN REGION OF BOLIVIA
    The deposit consists of audio and video recordings with transcriptions of Ese Ejja, an endangered language spoken in the Bolivian and Peruvian lowlands, resulting from fieldwork mostly conducted in Portachuelo Bajo, Bolivia, between 2005 and 2017. It also includes a bundle of all publications based on the Ese Ejja data collected.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4b712292-868b-4f94-a2c9-9ad395b34205

    Documentation of the Ese Ejja language of the Amazonian region of Bolivia
  • MAWNG RUTH SINGER

    MAWNG DICTIONARY PROJECT
    Mawng is one of the Iwaidjan languages, spoken in Australia’s Northern Territory, on Martpalk (Goulburn Island) and Minjilang (Croker Island). There are estimated to be around 300 first language speakers of Mawng. Data for this deposit comes from a field trip which was focused on checking dictionary definitions of triangular kinship terms and on collecting names for flora and fauna and associated knowledge. This deposit also includes audio recordings of myths and stories about traditional customs, as well as video recordings made by Elizabeth Langslow as part of the community video project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8291e474-7043-4ff4-ae76-5ae28bc556d9

    Mawng Dictionary Project
  • GOLPA JULIANE KABISCH-LINDENLAUB

    THE ANALYSIS OF GOLPA STORIES
    Golpa is a severely endangered Yol?u language spoken on Elcho Island, Northern Territory, Australia (for Galiwin'ku: longitude: 135°34'13.99"E, latitude: 12° 1'25.20"S). The stories were recorded back in the 1960s and have never been processed. There are only very few Golpa left who still speak and/or understand the language to a considerable extend. Processing these recordings will reveal and document linguistic and cultural knowledge about a dying Australian indigenous group and make it accessible to the community as well as to researchers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3e803341-bd3d-4c81-9f60-f5a31a6e6cb0

    The analysis of Golpa stories
  • GOLPA JULIANE KABISCH-LINDENLAUB

    THE PRODUCTION OF GOLPA LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION MATERIAL TO BE USED BY COMMUNITY MEMBERS: DICTIONARY, SKETCH GRAMMAR AND MORE ANALYZED STORIES
    The aim of the project is to produce Golpa language material that can be used by community members: a dictionary (mainly containing Golpa story book vocabulary (http://elar.soas.ac.uk/deposit/0139)), a sketch grammar that can be understood by the layperson, more processed stories about the Golpa, their land and culture and further grammatical and sociolinguistic data. Golpa is a severely endangered Yolngu language spoken on Elcho Island, Northern Territory, Australia. Only three of the very few Golpa still speak and/or understand the language to a considerable extent. The outcome of the project will be beneficial to the Golpa, neighbouring clans and to researchers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3fba225b-9af4-4cdf-aa18-3552c0477dc2

    The production of Golpa language documentation material to be used by community members: dictionary, sketch grammar and more analyzed stories
  • KUN-BARLANG RUTH SINGER, ISABELLE O'KEEFE

    VARIETIES OF KUN-BARLANG, A LANGUAGE ON THE EDGE: TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Kun-barlang is a highly endangered language traditionally spoken in northwestern Arnhem Land, Northern Australia. There are only around 60 remaining speakers. Almost all of the speakers are above the age of 40 and most are very elderly. Kun-barlang speakers now live in various multilingual Indigenous communities in northwestern Arnhem Land (Warruwi, Minjilang, Maningrida and Oenpelli) and in Darwin. The aim of this project is to create a community- and research-accessible corpus of Kun-barlang. Audiovisual recordings and documentation of new and existing Kun-barlang materials will be made in intergenerational teams with elderly speakers and younger Kun-barlang people.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e10a0865-3fdb-42c9-a44a-0ed3ff0f5714

  • KUN-BARLANG ISABEL O'KEEFFE

    COMPREHENSIVE PAN-VARIETAL, ETHNOBIOLOGICAL, ANTHROPOLOGICAL RECORD OF KUN-BARLANG
    This project will produce a comprehensive documentation of the remaining Kun-barlang varieties, a highly endangered language spoken in northwestern Arnhem Land, Northern Australia. Fewer than 60 speakers remain and most are elderly, so the need to annotate existing materials and create new recordings is urgent. Younger people will be trained and supported in the use of low-cost language documentation technology. Particular emphasis will be on documenting the full range of varieties and registers, including the undocumented 'widow's language,' and language in the domains of kinship, ethnobiology, music and public ceremony.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1edca13c-736f-4f46-8bce-82429702aaf3

    Comprehensive pan-varietal, ethnobiological, anthropological record of Kun-barlang
  • YAN-NHANGU CLAIRE BOWERN

    DOCUMENTATION OF YAN-NHANGU, AN UNDESCRIBED LANGUAGE OF NORTH-EASTERN ARNHEM LAND, NORTHERN AUSTRALIA
    Yan-Nhangu is spoken by members of a few families at Milingimbi Aboriginal Community in Eastern Arnhem Land, in Australia's Northern Territory. It is the least described language of the area, with very little previous work. This deposit consists of 160 audio recordings with transcriptions of speakers of Yan-Nhangu, resulting from fieldwork conducted between June 2004 and August 2006.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8197ba89-610c-4617-a03d-7022170fb0e5

    Documentation of Yan-Nhangu, an undescribed language of North-Eastern Arnhem Land, Northern Australia
  • BURARRA JILL VAUGHAN

    DOCUMENTING BURARRA DIALECTAL VARIATION WITHIN THE MULTILINGUAL ECOLOGY OF NORTH-CENTRAL ARNHEM LAND
    Speakers of Burarra (north-central Arnhem Land) identity four dialects of their language, but much variation that distinguishes them survives predominantly in older speakers, outside of the urban centre, Maningrida. This project will produce a stratified corpus of naturalistic language use across a range of genres from speakers across the Burarra region, and will gather rich data about multilingual practices and language ideologies. As well as providing a significant record of cultural, mythological and local territorial knowledge, the project’s fundamental focus on dialectal and other variation will enhance our understandings of the linguistic construction of difference in a highly multilingual context.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8ed9691a-9033-4ba7-bd89-ff70e621b142

    Documenting Burarra dialectal variation within the multilingual ecology of north-central Arnhem Land
  • ENAWENE-NAWE ANA PAULA BRANDAO

    LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION OF ENAWENE-NAWE (ARAWAK)
    The goal of the project is to provide urgent documentation of the Enawene-Nawe language and culture by organizing an audio-visual archive with naturally occurring discourse. The Enawene-Nawe people, who number approximately 1000 people, live in the Halataikwa community, near the Iquê river (Juruena affluent) in the northwest of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The expected outcomes of the project are: a translated, transcribed and annotated corpus of the language, a sketch grammar, a lexicon, the training of community members in documentation, and the first draft of a pedagogical material
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0ffc8f84-3eb3-48df-8663-6535361c2175

    Language Documentation of Enawene-Nawe (Arawak)
  • DALABON LINDA BARWICK, NICHOLAS EVANS, ALLAN MARETT, ISABEL O'KEEFFE

    SONGS OF WESTERN ARNHEM LAND AUSTRALIA
    The classical song traditions of Western Arnhem Land are amongst the foremost examples of verbal art in the nine endangered languages of the region, but few people are now competent to perform or comment on them. Typically performed in multi-lingual social contexts, song texts demonstrate unusual linguistic features such as mixtures of languages and a high proportion of esoteric and intimate vocabulary. The project team collected, transcribed, translated and analysed songs by contemporary performers, and where relevant repatriated and documented archival recordings, making the research results available to communities via a network of local digital repositories. Over fifty song repertories were documented.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cac7f520-29ed-4b9d-9db6-614bb6d90e40

    Songs of Western Arnhem Land Australia
  • ARAONA ADAM TALLMAN

    AN ETHNOGRAPHICALLY BASED LINGUISTIC DOCUMENTATION OF ARAONA: A TAKANAN LANGUAGE OF BOLIVIA
    This project will produce a collection of transcribed, translated and analyzed narratives, conversations and other culturally relevant speech practices from the endangered Araona language of the Takanan family, spoken by approximately 120 to 150 people on the Manurimi and Manupari rivers in the department of la Paz, Bolivia. These materials will serve as the basis for a grammatical description of the language and a linguistically based ethnography of the Araona people. Such a project is urgent because there are currently few documentary materials (either linguistic or cultural) available on the Araona, while they face pressure to adapt to the outside because of rapid economic growth in the national economy.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/29d065be-47f6-471e-a8c0-35ffe392e761

    An ethnographically based linguistic documentation of Araona: a Takanan language of Bolivia
  • AYURU, MEKENS, PURUBORá, MONDé, XIPAYA DENNIS MOORE

    DOCUMENTATION OF URGENTLY ENDANGERED TUPIAN LANGUAGES
    This collection contains documentation of five of the most urgently endangered native languages of Brazil, which are under-researched as of yet. These languages are: Mondé, Puruborá, Mekens, Ayuru, and Xipaya. These five languages belong to the lesser-known branches of the Tupi family. Only two have received prior intensive research and none has adequate documentation available.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/30de3972-5443-42e9-846c-12ddf60c1ac1

    Documentation of Urgently Endangered Tupian Languages
  • ASHéNINKA PERENé ELENA MIHAS

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF ASHéNINKA PERENé (ARAWAK)
    Asheninka Perene (Kampa, Arawak) is a significantly endangered, under documented language whose 5,500 speakers reside in the sixteen communities in the Perené valley, Junin province of Peru. This collection consists of audio and video recordings of myths, folk tales, humorous stories, stories about demonic creatures, trickster stories, ethnographic texts, oratory, songs, chants, tongue-twisters, and riddles.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/43974d32-9aaa-428a-bdca-67baf2312dfc

  • AKUNTSU CAROLINA COELHO ARAGON

    LINGUISTIC AND ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION OF AKUNTSú
    Akuntsú (a Tupían language) is spoken by only six people, all monolinguals, located near the Omerê River in Rondônia, Brazil (S.12.49’49.0’’ W.61.06’31.4’’). The six are the only survivors of genocide against this Indigenous group, isolated until recently. This project records and analyzes texts with detailed documentation of Akuntsú cultural traditions. It will contribute to a longer-range project to complete documentation of Akuntsú, with a reference grammar and dictionary at its core.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3be6507b-769b-4a28-9573-8e55e7f4302e

    Linguistic and Ethnographic documentation of Akuntsú
  • IRANXE-MYKY BERNAT BARDAGIL-MAS

    DOCUMENTING MANOKI (MYKY), AN ISOLATE OF BRAZILIAN AMAZONIA
    Myky is a severely endangered isolate language spoken by less than 100 people in Mato Grosso (Brazil) by two separate communities, Iranxe and Myky. The Iranxe community would like to preserve their dialect, spoken by only a declining number of elder speakers, and the knowledge of these remaining native speakers. This project aims to document the Iranxe variety of Myky and to enhance our understanding of this threatened isolate language, including its undescribed tonal system. The output will be recordings of narrative and conversational texts, transcriptions and annotations, and language materials for the community, and training of community documenters.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8c440a6b-1393-42e9-808f-f3c5c1a8371b

    Documenting Manoki (Myky), an isolate of Brazilian Amazonia
  • KAANJU, KUUKU YA’U, UMPILA CLAIR HILL

    PAMAN LANGUAGES: UMPILA, KUUKU YA’U, KAANJU
    The aim of this project is to document five highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula (Australia): Kugu Muminh, Kuku Thaypan, Umbuygamu, Umpila, and Wik Ngathan. The project is a team effort of five people with prior research experience on these languages, who want to pool knowledge and resources to document them as thoroughly as possible with the last generation of speakers. Our central goal is to produce an extensive representative corpus of texts, which will form a valuable resource for the communities involved, and will serve as the basis for further descriptive and community-oriented work.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4853b2f9-0921-4ef8-8a6f-cc4cd9be553d

  • GUN-NARTPA MARGARET CAREW

    A DOCUMENTATION OF GUN-NARTPA TEXTS
    Gun-nartpa, a Burarra dialect, is spoken in the Cadell river region of north-central Arnhem Land. There are approximately 300 speakers and the language is still learned as a first language by young children. The collection includes recordings of Gun-nartpa speakers from a range of ages. The recordings are segmented into prosodic units, and time-aligned annotations represent interlinear and intonational information and translations. It is hoped that these annotations will enable further investigation of the interactions between verb serialisation, prosody and event structure, and will be added to an existing annotated corpus of narratives and other genres recorded by the researcher in 1993-94.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6fc9abbe-31de-46df-b506-11f8dcd5d219

  • DALABON SARAH CUTFIELD

    DALABON ORAL HISTORIES PROJECT
    Dalabon (also known as Dangbon, Ngalkbon or Buwan) is a severely endangered Australian Aboriginal language of a diaspora population which lives in southern and western Arnhem Land, Australia. Dalabon is a polysynthetic non-Pama-Nyungan Australian Aboriginal language of the Gunwinyguan language family (Evans, Merlan, and Tukumba 2004; Evans and Merlan 2004). When completed this collection will contain: a rich audiovisual collection of several different genres, including personal narratives, telephone conversations, and statements on language (acquisition) philosophy; time-aligned transcriptions; a Shoebox lexical database; media products for community members in the form of bilingual subtitled videos and images from these videos; and a PhD thesis on spatial, discursive and gestural reference of demonstratives in Dalabon.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1498e482-152d-496d-810f-3857ad164f85

  • WIK-NGATHAN, WIK MUNGKAN PETER SUTTON

    PAMAN LANGUAGES: WIK NGATHAN, WIK MUNGKAN
    This deposit documents two Paman languages spoken on the Cape York Peninsular in Australia: Wik Ngathan and Wik Mungkan. The deposit contains a number of high-quality video recordings of community elders relating their oral history and talking about contemporary issues, word lists containing botanical information, and documents outlining the contents of legacy audio recordings made in the 1970s, including transcriptions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/406f9d4a-4a0c-4051-9bb6-5d49e4c7924c

    Paman languages: Wik Ngathan, Wik Mungkan
  • NAHUA CONRAD FEATHER

    DOCUMENTATION OF MYTHOLOGY AND SHAMANIC SONGS OF THE NAHUA
    Nahua is a Panoan language spoken in the Peruvian Amazon, specifically in the village of Santa Rosa de Serjali. This is a collection of audio and video recording of Nahua with transcriptions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2c6c9ff6-c859-4a09-8bb9-a00e8ebcf244

  • DALABON MAïA PONSONNET

    A CULTURALLY INFORMED CORPUS OF DALABON
    Dalabon is a severely endangered Australian language of central Arnhem Land, currently numbering less than five speakers. As part of a team effort to document Dalabon, this project contributes to the Dalabon corpus, focusing on two interconnected, linguistically and culturally significant domains. The first domain is body descriptions (body-parts and - functions); the second is emotions and other cognitive aspects of the person. The material presented in this project has formed the basis for a PhD Thesis and a monograph (Ponsonnet 2014, https://benjamins.com/catalog/clscc.4).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5b75ea37-052a-4924-a0ec-5e2a1d7e726e

    A culturally informed corpus of Dalabon
  • WIK-NGATHAN, WIK-NGATHARR LOUISE ASHMORE

    A PAN-DIALECTAL DOCUMENTATION OF WIK-NGATHAN AND WIK-NGATHARR: CAPE YORK PENINSULA, AUSTRALIA
    Wik-Ngathan and Wik-Ngatharr/Wik-Alken are Paman language varieties spoken on the west coast of Cape York Peninsula (CYP), Australia. Speaker numbers have significantly declined as the younger generation shift to the lingua franca of the area, Wik- Mungkan, and English. This documentation project involves working with speakers of Wik- Ngathan and Wik-Ngatharr to collect a range of transcribed and time-aligned audio and video language data. The documentation materials will form the basis for community-oriented resources and further descriptive work, including a detailed analysis of the demonstrative system in the languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/90d87d74-1a5c-4705-bfda-64726e89381e

  • NGAN'GI NICHOLAS REID

    DOCUMENTING THE NGAN’GI LANGUAGE
    Ngan'gi is a severely endangered language spoken by less than 200 people in the Daly River region of Australia's Northern Territory. The exists some description of this language, but no real documentation. This project aims to thoroughly document Ngan'gi through the collection, transcription and archiving of a rich variety of linguistic and sociolinguistic practices, resulting in text, audio and video products that will be accessible to the community as well as safely archived for future uses.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bf0695d7-f7b4-40b4-9f16-25146824a191

    Documenting the Ngan’gi language
  • VURëS CATRIONA HYSLOP

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE VURëS LANGUAGE, VANUA LAVA, VANUATU
    This collection contains documentation of the language known in the literature as Ifira-Mele or Mele-Fila. The language is represented by two dialects spoken by what today are two clearly distinct communities. One dialect is spoken on the island of Ifira or Fila (Vila) in Vila Bay, the bay in which Port Vila, the capital of Vanuatu, sits. The other dialect is spoken in the large village of Mele (Imere), less than 10km from Port Vila. This language is one of three Polynesian Outlier languages spoken in Vanuatu. Currently this deposit consists of data collected in 2018 and 2019.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1f2c9f98-a0e7-4f04-9e97-4222e669babd

  • MALAKMALAK DOROTHEA HOFFMANN

    DOCUMENTING MALAKMALAK, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN AUSTRALIA
    MalakMalak is a northern Daly language spoken in the Daly River area in north-western Australia. Today it has an estimated eight remaining speakers. While there is some existing description of the language, no systematic documentation efforts have been made so far. This collection aims to complement existing sketch grammars with audio-visual recordings with a focus on documenting traditional stories and culturally significant processes such as hunting and gathering or tool-making and by compiling a 2,000-word dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/605e5919-ec8d-447c-a6b6-413086a032d7

  • ANINDILYAKWA MARIE-ELAINE VAN EGMOND

    DOCUMENTATION OF ENINDHILYAKWA
    This research project studies Enindhilyakwa (also known as Anindilyakwa), spoken by about 1500 people on Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory, Australia. This project documents the morpho-syntax of Anindilyakwa and includes a basic learner’s grammar for future literacy programs. Anindilyakwa is a polysynthetic language, allowing a high degree of complexity in its word structure. It is endangered because of cultural breakdown, illiteracy, lack of teaching material and growing influence of English. This is manifested in the fact that the more complex forms are no longer being used by younger speakers today. This project focuses on the documentation of this morpho-syntactic complexity.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/dcafaa2e-a703-4c34-a67b-a26599f48a51

    Documentation of Enindhilyakwa
  • JAWOYN FRANCESCA MERLAN

    JAWOYN CULTURAL TEXTS, DICTIONARY AND GRAMMAR (SOUTHERN ARNHEM LAND)
    Jawoyn (Djauan, ISO-639: djn) is an endangered Gunwinyguan language spoken in northern Australia. It has only three remaining speakers. This collection consists of an extensive corpus of material on Jawoyn. There will be texts, a draft dictionary, and portions of a basic, comprehensive grammar which may initially focus on specific phonetic, phonological and morphological problems. This collection adds to the corpus of materials available for typological and comparative work, and undoubtedly allow advances in plausible reconstruction among some of the evidently closely related Gunwinyguan languages. It is hoped that the materials made available can be used by other Australianists, as well as the community of people from which the information emanates.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a5cf3c28-993f-4fe2-af02-682bedcfa1c0

    Jawoyn Cultural Texts, Dictionary and Grammar (southern Arnhem Land)
  • REYESANO ANTOINE GUILLAUME

    DOCUMENTATION OF REYESANO, AN ALMOST EXTINCT LANGUAGE OF BOLIVIA (SOUTH AMERICA)
    This collection documents Reyesano, the most endangered language and least-known of the Takana languages spoken in the Amazonian rainforests of Northern Bolivia and Eastern Peru. The Reyesano language is spoken in the villages of Reyes and Santa Rosa in the Ballivián province of Bolivia. The deposit contains over 230 audio and visual recordings, transcriptions and Spanish and English translations, which include recordings of the natural world, descriptions of life, traditional activities, stories and the elicitation of vocabulary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/be5dc4c9-99ad-4aca-89eb-036f0f9dad8a

    Documentation of Reyesano, an almost extinct language of Bolivia (South America)
  • PARESI-HALITI GLAUBER ROMLING DA SILVA

    VERBAL EVENTS IN PARESI-HALITI
    This collection is a documentation of the Paresi-Haliti language (Arawak), spoken in Southern Brazilian Amazonia. This language shows clear signs of endangerment, especially in the intergenerational transmission of key oral traditions. This collection includes audio and video files, conversations and songs in Paresi-Haliti.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/70485633-c08b-4dec-8578-c30db3ab31dd

  • SHANGAJI MAUD DEVOS

    SHANGAJI. A MAKA OR SWAHILI LANGUAGE OF MOZAMBIQUE. GRAMMAR, TEXTS AND WORDLIST
    Shangaji is spoken in three small villages in the Nampula province of Mozambique. The deposit focuses on the variant spoken in Naatthembo village, just west of the Sangage peninsula which begins north of Angoche town. Naatthembo has more or less 4000 inhabitants and represents the major Shangaji speaking centre with the two other locations; Nakonya village and the Likookha area in Mogincual adding more or less 500 and 700 speakers to this number of speakers which is in decline due to a lack of intergenerational language transfer. Nthamala village, some 10 km away from Naatthembo, no longer has Shangaji speakers because of a complete shift to the regional lingua franca Makhuwa (Enlai). The Shangaji deposit thus responds to an urgent documentation need, also because the language is one of four coastal languages that are believed to bear traces of the Swahili world which once stretched from Somalia to the south of Mozambique.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e49bdff6-9d6d-42dd-a8fd-fb63ee1ac248

    Shangaji. A Maka or Swahili Language of Mozambique. Grammar, texts and wordlist
  • KOKO BERA, KUUK THAAYORRE, KUGU MUMINH, WIK MUNGKAN, WIK YI’ANH ALICE GABY

    PAMAN LANGUAGES: KUUK THAAYORRE, WIK YI’ANH, KUGU MUMINH, KOKO BERA, WIK MUNGKAN
    This collection forms part of a project documenting five highly endangered langages: Kugu Muminh, Kuku Thaypan, Umbuygamu, Umpila, and Wik Ngathan. The resulting collections were compiled by a team of five people with prior research experience on these languages, in order to pool knowledge and resources to document them as thoroughly as possible with the last generation of speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/dad9d54d-567a-4ce2-838e-72b4175b1ad7

    Paman languages: Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, Wik Mungkan
  • SIRIONO NOé GASPARINI

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SIRIONO
    This collection documents Siriono (Tupi-Guarani family), an under-described and endangered language of the Bolivian lowlands. Nearly a thousand Siriono people live in a small area, with less than a dozen fluent speakers and around forty occasional speakers. The language is threatened by the use of the national language, Spanish, despite the fact that Siriono is also an official language. This data collection contains mainly raw video of Siriono people speaking about daily life and past ways of living,including an audiovisual documentation corpus with about 27 hours of video and pedagogical material made with and for the community. The main document is a Siriono-Spanish dictionary with about 1,600 entries. There are also three booklets with the names of mammals, fish and birds, as well as a banner with the seasonality of local fruits. A grammatical description of the language in the form of a PhD dissertation is also included, written in French.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5d5729bc-22c9-485f-8644-ee350ad9255a

    Documentation and Description of Siriono
  • CHIMANE SANDY RITCHIE

    CHIMANE DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Chimane (or Tsimane') is spoken by 3000-5000 people in lowland Bolivia. The project aims to document and map speech practices across the Chimane speaking area, to produce a multimedia encyclopedia of cultural and linguistic information and community-led film, and to train interested community members in language documentation techniques and furnish them with equipment so they may continue the project after the end of the funding period. The applicant will also complete a doctoral thesis comprising a sketch grammar and a detailed study of valency changing operations in the language based on documentary materials arising from the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ed860f93-7bf7-47de-8ee5-31849bc70aec

    Chimane Documentation Project
  • MWENYI, MBOWE NANCY KULA

    A PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION OF SILUYANA: COMPARING MBOWE AND MWENYI
    Mbowe and Mwenyi are two of the Siluyana dialect cluster in the Western Province of Zambia. The main dialect Luyi is no longer spoken with only 3 rememberers remaining. Mbowe has 2,690 speakers and Mwenyi an estimated 6,000. Documentation will produce audio and video data of different speech genres and create archival data providing a database for future documentation of the cluster. Documenting these two languages will provide key evidence for understanding the dynamics of language and identity in the area in both its historical and structural dimensions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e8078202-9614-4e7b-8cda-388e8e83b17b

    A preliminary documentation of Siluyana: comparing Mbowe and Mwenyi
  • MARRA GREG DICKSON

    STORIES FROM THE SALTWATER AS TOLD BY THE OLD MARRA LADIES
    Marra language and land is situated on a coastal strip on the Gulf of Carpentaria in Northern Australia, centred around the Limmen Bight District. This project focused on a group of 6-7 elderly, fully-fluent Marra speakers who were the last who grew up on their traditional country with little contact with Europeans. Other Marra people who grew up in missions and stations did not acquire Marra to full fluency. The speakers involved in this project lived in Ngukurr and Numbulwar. All but one passed away within a decade of the project. This project took place over a period of two years (2010-2012), led by Greg Dickson, a PhD student with several years of prior history working with the community. Greg worked across Ngukurr and Numbulwar to record a variety of audio recordings with Marra speakers. Recordings range from short traditional stories, oral histories, conversational group recordings involving up to five speakers as well as sessions where elders reviewed and informed or translated/transcribed archival recordings. Other languages occasionally feature: primarily Nunggubuyu (Wubuy). A number of recordings are transcribed and translated into Kriol (the local lingua franca). A smaller selection are also glossed and translated into English.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a2b3b69e-41a3-4971-ab90-168fb64a942c

    Stories from the Saltwater as told by the old Marra ladies
  • SAKAO, N'KEP MIRIAM MEYERHOFF

    DOCUMENTATION OF N'KEP (NORTH VANUATU): STRUCTURE AND VARIATION
    This project documents the use and structure of N'kep, a variety of Sakao (ISO 639-3 sku), spoken by c.800 people at Hog Harbour, Vanuatu (15º 8' 0" South, 167º 6' 0" East). N'kep is typologically unusual and under increasing pressure from the national creole. The project includes a variationist sociolinguistics perspective, and explores the potential for these methods to complement endangered language documentation. A range of text types (from very rehearsed to very spontaneous), and samples from speakers of 3+ age groups will be recorded by the researcher and trained local language assistants.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a0c44ad7-fcc4-45bf-8b87-592fe76dcde1

  • GAJIRRABENG FRANCES KOFOD , KNUT OLAWSKY

    GAJIRRABENG – ‘BOORRB-GOO JEMANG JOODI-JOODIB NGALAMBERRMI?’: ‘HAVE YOU FINISHED WRITING QUICKLY ON THE PAPER?’
    Gajirrabeng Language Archive. Depositor: Frances Kofod. Narrative including oral history, dreaming stories and ghost stories as well as elicitation covering vocabulary and grammar of the Gajirrabeng language once spoken to the north of Kununurra in Western Australia and the land just across the border in the Northern Territory.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2b6ef9cf-9303-4896-acc4-73fc7f03f217

    Gajirrabeng – ‘Boorrb-goo jemang joodi-joodib ngalamberrmi?’: ‘Have you finished writing quickly on the paper?’
  • LELEPA SEBASTIEN LACRAMPE

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF LELEPA, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF CENTRAL VANUATU
    Lelepa is spoken by less than 400 people on the island of Lelepa, Vanuatu. It is surrounded by closely related and much larger languages. Both missionisation in the 1800s and recent, rapid urbanization and development have contributed to threatening the language as speakers are shifting to languages of wider communication such as Bislama (an English-lexifier pidgin and national language of Vanuatu) and not transmitting the language to younger generations. This project aims at building a corpus of annotated texts from audio and video recordings to be used as a foundation for a grammatical description and language resources for Lelepa speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/109b35f2-e728-43d5-89d2-e9e34661af17

  • MAVEA VALéRIE GUéRIN

    DISCOVERING MAVEA: TEXTS, GRAMMAR, AND LEXICON
    Mafea, or Mavea, is an Austronesian language spoken by about 200 people on Mafea island, northern Vanuatu. To date, the only publication about the language is a 300-word list collected by Jacques Guy and published in Tryon 1976. This deposit consists of annotated audio recordings of speakers of Mafea, resulting from fieldwork conducted between June 2005 and December 2007.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/489b45c1-1a4f-416b-bba6-ab5830bf3e9a

    Discovering Mavea: texts, grammar, and lexicon
  • GURINDJI KRIOL FELICITY MEAKINS

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF GURINDJI KRIOL
    Gurindji Kriol (GK) is an endangered mixed language (ML) spoken in Australia. It fuses Gurindji (Pama-Nyungan), with Kriol (English-lexifier) to create a unique system. GK is an important language to younger Gurindji people, entailing both modern and traditional Aboriginal ideologies. It is also significant linguistically, displaying a rarely observed mixed structure. GK provides a unique opportunity to document a ML. MLs often represent a prolonged stage of language change which precedes language shift. Thus the existence of MLs often goes by unobserved. In the case of GK, documentation is urgently required, with Kriol finding increasing currency with Gurindji teenagers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8a3f68ed-9641-490d-9753-fb47fad58324

  • MORROBOLAM, UMPITHAMU, MBARRUMBATHAMA JEAN-CHRISTOPHE VERSTRAETE

    PAMAN LANGUAGES: UMPITHAMU, MORROBOLAM, MBARRUMBATHAMA
    Recordings (audio and video) and transcriptions of texts, lexical and grammatical elicitation in Umpithamu, Morrobolam and Mbarrumbathama. Recordings were made with Mrs. Florrie Bassani, Mr. Bobby Stewart and Mrs. Daisy Stewart.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/073ce851-44f5-4229-9c35-e30596340ae0

    Paman languages: Umpithamu, Morrobolam, Mbarrumbathama
  • KUKU THAYPAN, AWU ALAYA BRUCE RIGSBY

    PAMAN LANGUAGES: KUKU THAYPAN, AWU ALAYA
    This collection is part of a larger, collaborative documentation project of five highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula (Australia): Kugu Muminh, Kuku Thaypan, Umbuygamu, Umpila, and Wik Ngathan. The project is a team effort of five people with prior research experience on these languages, who are pooling their knowledge and resources to document them as thoroughly as possible with the last generation of speakers. Our central goal was the production of an extensive, representative corpus of texts, which forms a valuable resource for the communities involved, and serves as the basis for further descriptive and community-oriented work.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c3c0b542-f488-4d15-9e9f-f70de97fffee

    Paman languages: Kuku Thaypan, Awu Alaya
  • GWARAYU, GUARASUñE’E (PAUSERNA) SWINTHA DANIELSEN

    GIZAC – GWARAYU AND THE INTERMEDIATE ZONE (AMAZONIA – CHACO, BOLIVIA) DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    GIZA is a language documentation project in Bolivia, working with endangered Gwarayu (gyr) and almost extinct Guarasuñe’e (psm), more widely known as Pauserna. Both languages belong to the Tupi-Guarani family. Gwarayu has approximately 5,000 speakers of varying competence, and of Guarasuñe’e there are only four speakers left. The two hitherto underinvestigated languages are found in a linguistic contact region and geographical intermediate zone between Bolivian Amazonia and Chaco. GIZA aims at compiling a large multi-purpose corpus that allows for scientific research on the two languages as well as for revitalisation activities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/98dc4979-5835-4066-8067-a94a244b7459

  • SKE KAY JOHNSON

    DOCUMENTATION OF SKE (SEKE) - AN UNDESCRIBED AND ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF PENTECOST ISLAND, VANUATU
    Ske is an undescribed, Austronesian language of Pentecost Island, Vanuatu. It is spoken by approximately 600 people in an area surrounded by speakers of the dominant local language. Together with the community, this multimedia collection was compiled. The collection consists of contains annotated, audio and video data of different genres: oral histories, ceremonial speech and conversation; photographs of flora and fauna, cultural objects and the community members.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6a876738-cfc3-4c0e-9ef9-2f9c00e15e097

    Documentation of Ske (Seke) - an undescribed and endangered language of Pentecost Island, Vanuatu
  • NGARINYIN STEF SPRONCK

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NGARINYIN, A LANGUAGE OF THE KIMBERLEY REGION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
    For centuries Ngarinyin (a Non-Pama-Nyungan language) has been the main language of the Northern central Kimberley Region of Western Australia, being spoken over an area of up to 45,000 km2. Nowadays, however, only about a dozen of elderly speakers use it as their preferred language and Ngarinyin is no longer passed on to children. This collection consists of documented elicited and un-elicited Ngarinyin speech and conversation and supplements existing mid-20th century sound recordings of Ngarinyin with sorely missed metadata.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/20638881-5b70-4f69-af62-35902fe54758

  • HA MURRAY GARDE

    A PRELIMINARY AUDIOVISUAL DOCUMENTATION OF HA, A LANGUAGE OF VANUATU
    The Ha language is spoken in a single village of approximately 150 people on the southern tip of Pentecost Island in Vanuatu. It is the southernmost variety of the language known as Sa, but with significant lexical and some grammatical differences to other related varieties. Ha speakers say they have historical links to the people and language of North Ambrym immediately to the south. This preliminary documentation of Ha aims to investigate the distinctive grammatical, lexical and cultural features of Ha and its place in the Sa dialect continuum through the audiovisual documentation of conversation, narrative, ecological knowledge and verbal art.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5bb9ecca-1480-4362-ac15-8c7a05e1361b

  • MATANVAT (NESE) LANA TAKAU

    DOCUMENTATION OF MATANVAT (NESE): A HIGHLY ENDANGERED NORTHERN VANUATU LANGUAGE
    The Matanvat (Nese) language (less than 20 speakers) is an under-documented Oceanic language spoken in the north eastern coast of Malakula in central Vanuatu. Pressure from Bislama along with other social factors are contributing to the language's rapid decline. The collection is roughly around 12 hours in total of video and audio materials. The video materials are mainly of discussions between the last speakers of the language on certain cultural topics such as gardening techniques, how houses were made in the past, and the different names of different crop varieties such as yams. The audio files are mainly elicitation sessions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6fb0013e-97bc-4d79-b339-10a7138c180b

    Documentation of Matanvat (Nese): A highly endangered Northern Vanuatu language
  • URIPIV-WALA-RANO-ATCHIN KANAUHEA WESSELS

    ATCHIN DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    This project aims to document the language variety of Atchin Island, located off the northeastern coast of Malekula in Vanuatu. Through the creation of an extended corpus of audio-visual recordings, field observations and elicited lexicographic materials, the features of the language will be explored in as many contexts as possible. Alongside the technical analysis of Atchin for a linguistic audience, the corpus will provide input for a pedagogic grammar sketch, extended bilingual wordlists (Atchin-Bislama and Atchin-English), and literacy materials destined for kindergarten and Years 1 to 3 of the formal education system.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/be852231-9ffc-4c1a-b0d0-6e619037d7b7

    Atchin Documentation Project
  • TIRAX, V’ëNEN TAUT, TAPE ROYCE DODD

    DOCUMENTING NORTHWEST MALEKULA: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF V’ëNEN TAUT, TAPE, AND TIRAX
    V’ënen Taut, Tirax, and Tape, the three languages of the Northwest Malekula subgroup (Oceanic, Vanuatu), have been partially described but poorly documented. Focusing on field work, this project aims to create an audio-visual documentation corpus for each language. V’ënen Taut and Tirax both have small healthy populations, but in the case of Tape, only 4 native speakers remain and the need for documentation is urgent. All three language communities are engaged in literacy and/or revitalisation activities, and welcome this documentation project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7410ba1d-9c8c-473a-8e6a-3ba99123e9a0

    Documenting Northwest Malekula: A comparative study of V’ënen Taut, Tape, and Tirax
  • NORTH AMBRYM, ORKON/FANBAK MICHAEL FRANJIEH

    THE LANGUAGES OF NORTHERN AMBRYM, VANUATU
    This deposit encompasses two Oceanic languages of Vanuatu – North Ambrym and Fanbyak. Both languages are spoken in the northern part of Ambrym Island in Central Vanuatu. They are part of the Central Vanuatu Linkage, belonging to the Southern Oceanic Linkage of Oceanic. North Ambrym is the larger of the two languages with around 4000 – 4500 speakers in total, making it one of the larger languages of Vanuatu. Fanbyak (originally spelt Fanbak) is one of the smaller languages of Vanuatu, with roughly 130 speakers. Fanbyak was originally spoken in the village of Fanbyak on the eastern side of northern Ambrym. Currently there are over 20 hours of video and 50 hours of audio recording for the North Ambrym language. For the Fanbyak language there are over five hours of video and 22 hours of audio recordings.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/320b94fe-371f-4b00-a2df-fd771367b6b6

    The languages of northern Ambrym, Vanuatu
  • NEVERVER JULIE BARBOUR

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE NEVERVER LANGUAGE, MALEKULA, VANUATU
    The Neverver language of Malakula is spoken by fewer than 600 people in the villages of Limap and Lingarakh. The documentation comprises a corpus of over 100 recordings of stories, interviews, and conversations. There is also an extensive collection of botanical images. Outputs of the documentation project to date include a detailed grammatical description, a number of academic papers, and a growing body of literacy materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/666e5ec2-dd1b-4bb6-afe8-dbf6f467dab0

  • BANAM BAY BRITTANY RAE HOBACK

    BANAM BAY LANGUAGE: DOCUMENTATION AND ENDANGERED LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE
    Banam Bay is spoken in Southeast Malekula, Vanuatu by less than 900 speakers. Previously classified by Darrell Tryon (1976) as three different dialects, it has more recently been categorized as one, Banam Bay Area Language (Crowley 2000). Banam Bay has recorded wordlists, but is otherwise undocumented. This project involves working with community members in data collection, facilitating a basic orthography and creating resources for language management and vernacular literacy material creation. A basic grammar sketch and language description will satisfy my PhD dissertation, which will be archived alongside a repository of audio-recorded transcribed and translated narratives and updated trilingual wordlists.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/36fba566-78c9-4043-9440-c1d776efe702

    Banam Bay Language: Documentation and Endangered Language Maintenance
  • NINDE CAROLINE CROUCH

    NINDE DOCUMENTATION AND ORTHOGRAPHIC DESIGN PROJECT
    This project is concerned with the documentation of Ninde, a threatened Central Malekula (Oceanic) language spoken in five villages in the South West Bay region of Malekula island of Vanuatu. Ninde is almost entirely undocumented; there is a sketch grammar based on data from one young speaker. The language is spoken by at most 1000 people, and in four of the five villages is not being transmitted to children. One of the immediate goals of this project is the community-led creation of an orthography and possibly even pedagogical materials in order to facilitate Ninde-language education and preserve traditional knowledge.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/266be7a5-a3d6-464b-a53b-f25d94c5ef1a

    Ninde documentation and orthographic design project
  • PAAMESE SIMON DEVYLDER

    BLACK SAND STORIES: A POLYSEMIOTIC AND MULTIMODAL DOCUMENTATION OF PAAMESE SAND STORIES, A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED TRADITION OF VANUATU
    This deposit consists of culturally enriched descriptions of Paamese used in its broad polysemiotic and multimodal context (co-speech gesture and co-speech depiction) and through a variety of cultural practices with a specific focus on the vanishing art of sand drawing. The speech, gestures, and complex geometrical drawings of sand stories, is a unique form of communication, practiced by only four sand drawers on Paama, Vanuatu. These important mnemonic devices for local histories, indigenous cosmologies, kinship systems, and scientific knowledge have been listed as Intangible Heritage of Humanity by the UNESCO since 2008, but have never been documented in a systematic way.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6f76fcfe-93c6-428c-b0e2-2b7bf95f983d

    Black sand stories: a polysemiotic and multimodal documentation of Paamese sand stories, a critically endangered tradition of Vanuatu
  • AHAMB TIHOMIR RANGELOV

    DOCUMENTING AHAMB, A SMALL ISLAND LANGUAGE OF VANUATU
    This collection contains the results of the Ahamb Language Documentation Project (2017-2020). Ahamb is a previously undocumented Oceanic language with some 950 speakers who live primarily on the small low-lying Ahamb Island off South Malekula, Vanuatu. The collection contains a text corpus of over 93,000 words of transcribed, translated and interlinearised digital audio/video materials and other texts, a grammatical description, a trilingual wordlist, as well as unannotated audio/video recordings of Ahamb speech.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a9f624c2-f4e0-44b2-9603-d2ec8efc5536

    Documenting Ahamb, a Small Island Language of Vanuatu
  • NA'AHAI ANASTASIA RIEHL

    INITIAL DOCUMENTATION OF NA’AHAI, A LANGUAGE OF MALAKULA, VANUATU
    This collection represents members of the Na’ahai-speaking community on Malekula Island, Vanuatu, which has less than 1,000 speakers. This collection was compiled with two main objectives in mind. First, the collection should represent an initial documentation of the language, in the form of a basic grammatical sketch as well as a transcribed and translated collection of audio and video recordings of stories, songs, and dialogues, and should enable an assessment of the feasibility of a longer-term, more extensive documentation project. Second, the project underpinning this collection should train community members in their own ongoing documentation of the language, in particular in the compilation of a dictionary, for which there is considerable local interest.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/50ddf653-25f1-4318-9dcc-6ba9d851fe56

    Initial Documentation of Na’ahai, a language of Malakula, Vanuatu
  • BéSIRO PIERRIC SANS

    DOCUMENTATION OF BéSIRO, THE ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF THE CHIQUITANO PEOPLE OF LOWLAND BOLIVIA
    This collection documents and describes Bésiro, an under-described language spoken by the Chiquitanos in the Bolivian lowlands. There are less than 5,000 speakers of Bésiro (including 700 living in Brazil).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/08ac4df5-524c-4d8c-9252-752c04567644

    Documentation of Bésiro, the endangered language of the Chiquitano people of Lowland Bolivia
  • BIEREBO PETER BUDD

    AUDIO RECORDINGS AND IMAGES OF BIEREBO SPEAKERS
    Bierebo is an undescribed Oceanic language spoken on the island of Epi in Vanuatu. There are an estimated 800 speakers who live in several villages mainly on the west coast. This deposit consists of audio recordings and images of speakers of the Bonkovio dialect of Bierebo, resulting from fieldwork conducted between July 2005 and September 2007.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/088b79d1-08ff-4824-a665-97d3ad3099de

    Audio recordings and images of Bierebo speakers
  • PAUNAKA SWINTHA DANIELSEN

    PAUNAKA LANGUAGE ARCHIVE
    Paunaka is a critically endangered Southern Arawakan language, spoken in the Bolivian Chaco (16°46’15” S, 61°27’15” W). Today there are only 11 speakers left with competences ranging from fluent to mostly passive knowledge and even one L2 speaker. This deposit assembles the materials collected by the tram of the Paunaka Documentation Project (PDP), a major documentation project funded by ELDP which ran from 2011 to 2013.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f7a10695-158f-4c71-aad7-876d46d58b3a

    Paunaka language archive
  • FAKAMAE AMY DEWAR

    DOCUMENTATION OF FAKAMAE, A POLYNESIAN OUTLIER OF VANUATU
    This project documents Fakamae, spoken on the island of Emae in Shefa province, Vanuatu. This language holds a significant position within the approximately 138 languages of Vanuatu, being one of only three Polynesian Outlier languages in the country. Fakamae is threatened by a number of factors, including close contact with urban communities, which is leading to some shift to the lingua franca, Bislama. Fakamae has approximately 382 speakers, half of whom live amongst the small Emae island population of approximately 750.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a48b2822-5873-4c2e-839a-f8a36725358e

    Documentation of Fakamae, a Polynesian Outlier of Vanuatu
  • KAYARDILD ERICH ROUND

    LINGUISTIC AND ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION OF KAYARDILD
    The Kayardild language was traditionally spoken on Bentinck Island, Queensland, Australia. Kayardild was the last language of the Tangkic language family to be spoken in its classical form. Two projects have recorded and documented texts, song, elicitation sessions, and traditional food gathering activities. The documentation consists of over 500 files, including audio, video, ELAN transcription files and summary metadata.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4a9c8d80-19ad-4bb4-9556-56b0046f0ad5

    Linguistic and Ethnographic documentation of Kayardild
  • IFIRA-MELE CATRIONA MALAU

    DOCUMENTATION OF IFIRA-MELE, A POLYNESIAN OUTLIER OF VANUATU
    This collection contains documentation of the language known in the literature as Ifira-Mele or Mele-Fila. The language is represented by two dialects spoken by what today are two clearly distinct communities. One dialect is spoken on the island of Ifira or Fila (Vila) in Vila Bay, the bay in which Port Vila, the capital of Vanuatu, sits. The other dialect is spoken in the large village of Mele (Imere), less than 10km from Port Vila. This language is one of three Polynesian Outlier languages spoken in Vanuatu. Currently this deposit consists of data collected in 2018 and 2019.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c4a5b212-4cf4-4e49-bab1-819ac28ef8d7

    Documentation of Ifira-Mele, a Polynesian Outlier of Vanuatu
  • ANEITYUM, SIE, RAGA (HANO), NAMAKURA, SOUTHWEST TANNA, NORTH TANNA RICHARD SHING, NICK THIEBERGER

    VANUATU CULTURAL CENTRE TAPE DIGITISATION
    This project targets tapes in a number of languages of Vanuatu, made by a range of people over the past 50 years and deposited with the Vanuatu Kaljoral Senta. Very few recordings have been made for most of the 130 languages of Vanuatu, and the VKS collection includes unique records made both by local and visiting researchers. For example: Sperlich's 28 Namakir tapes, made in the 1980s and similarly Facey's 17 Nguna tapes are the sole analog versions of these recordings made in the 1970s. Other recordings came out of the remarkable fieldworker program for which Vanuatu is famous.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/da9cfe78-70b2-4e2c-bb7e-6c6ae799ab05

  • ETON ROSEY BILLINGTON

    DOCUMENTING SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PRACTICES IN ETON
    Eton is an Oceanic language spoken on the island of Efate, Vanuatu. There are an estimated 500 speakers, but indications that language shift is underway. Previous materials on Eton are extremely limited, but suggest interesting typological and historical patterns, particularly in the sound system. This documentation project will record and transcribe audio and video materials capturing natural speech produced in a range of contexts and genres, and speech produced in targeted discussions and tasks, in collaboration with community members. These will form the basis of structured corpora which will be drawn on for detailed linguistic analyses and community-oriented language resources.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/15004750-0aa9-4f9e-8971-8f903a7e8f0b

    Documenting speech and language practices in Eton
  • GIJA FRANCES KOFOD

    THE PAINTER’S EYE, THE PAINTER’S VOICE: LANGUAGE, ART AND LANDSCAPE IN THE GIJA WORLD
    Gija is a member of the non-Pama-Nyungan Jarragan language family from East Kimberley in northwestern Australia. Today, 800 or more Gija people live in Warmun Community (Turkey Creek), Kununurra, Halls Creek and some other small outstations including Bow River, Frog Hollow and Imintji. Only people over sixty are fluent speakers of Gija, and still frequently use it among themselves. This deposit includes examples of Gija from up to 40 different speakers with many painting stories from artists who are heading figures in the East Kimberley art movement.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a09cb4c0-6f05-4429-9d2c-f79387724a11

    The painter’s eye, the painter’s voice: language, art and landscape in the Gija world
  • WANYJIRRA CHIKAKO SENGE

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF WANYJIRRA, A LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN AUSTRALIA
    Wanyjirra is an Australian language of the Ngumpin-Yapa group of the Pama-Nyungan family. There are two fluent speakers who live in the town of Halls Creek, Western Australia. At the time of the field work, both were over 80 years old. Their descendents and other community members do not have a full command of Wanyjirra. This collection contains descriptions and documentation of Wanyjirra, mainly taken from the two remaining speakers and their families.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fdc54ea7-b1f6-42af-afc3-3cb6a88fe617

  • ||XEGWI , ||ANI, G|UI, MBUKUSHU, KHOEKHOE, KHWE, HERERO, HAI||OM, TAA, !XUN, G||ANA GERTRUD BODEN

    DIGITIZATION OF OSWIN KOHLER’S ANALOGUE AUDIO RECORDINGS OF ENDANGERED AND MORIBUND KHOISAN LANGUAGES
    Digitization of Oswin Kohler's analogue audio recordings of endangered and moribund Khoisan languages This collection of audio files from different Khoisan languages in Southern Africa was mainly recorded in the 1950s through 1970s by the late German Professor for African Studies, Dr. Oswin Köhler (1911-1996). It includes recordings from the highly endangered Khwe, !Xun and Taa, and the extinct or moribund |'Auni, ||Xegwi and N||ng languages. The recordings were made at a time, when recordings were still rare and all these languages were still spoken more widely. Since they contain information on abandoned or modified cultural practices they represent valuable assets of the cultural heritage of these Khoisan peoples.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/66a0fb28-86d2-4cb7-bde0-f1712728a622

    Digitization of Oswin Kohler’s analogue audio recordings of endangered and moribund Khoisan languages
  • WARLPIRI CARMEL O’SHANNESSY

    TRADITIONAL WARLPIRI SONGS
    Warlpiri is a Pama-Nyungan language spoken by approximately 3,000 people in the Northern Territory of Australia, most of whom live in small remote communities. This deposit includes six traditional Warlpiri love songs, called yilpinji, sung by Teddy Morrison Jupurrurla and two ceremonial initiation songs, sung by Peter Dixon Japanangka and a group of elderly men.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/13d392f3-9bdf-4573-9fbf-9f6306df0ef5

    Traditional Warlpiri Songs
  • ARANDIC JENNY GREEN

    NARRATIVE ART: MULTIMODAL DOCUMENTATION OF SPEECH, SONG, SIGN, DRAWING AND GESTURE IN ARANDIC STORYTELLING TRADITIONS FROM CENTRAL AUSTRALIA
    This collection is a significant and unique contribution to the documentary record of the diversity of Arandic verbal/visual art forms, containing examples of sand stories and of sign language documentation which are a highly valued yet endangered part of the traditions of Central Australian peoples. The deposit represents speakers from a majority of the languages within the Arandic group – Northern & Southern Alyawarr, Central & Eastern Anmatyerr, Eastern & Central Arrernte (sometimes referred to as Mparntwe Arrernte) and Kaytetye.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c66f4550-2c5b-40e4-8fe7-086ffde25beb

    Narrative art: multimodal documentation of speech, song, sign, drawing and gesture in Arandic storytelling traditions from Central Australia
  • MANGETTI DUNE !XUNG AMANDA MILLER

    A VIDEO AND TEXT DOCUMENTATION OF MANGETTI DUNE !XUNG
    This collection is the result of a language documentation project on Mangetti Dune !Xung, a Ju-+Hoan language spoken in multi-ethnic north-eastern Namibia and in Schmittsdrift, South Africa. The community originally lived in Angola but fled from there during the Angolan civil war. This collection includes video and text recordings of the language that were gathered and prepared using the Basic Oral Language Documentation (BOLD) method of documentation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/12b670bb-9007-4466-812f-268650d93322

  • KERINCI ERNANDA

    DOCUMENTATION OF PNA ‘ORAL TRADITONS’ IN KOTO KERAS, KERINCI, INDONESIA
    This project aims at documenting Pna (oral traditions, lyrical prose) that is threatened in the Koto Keras (henceforth, KK) dialect of Kerinci. Located in Sumatra, Indonesia, the population of KK is 1581 but less than 800 people speak the language since 50% of the population consists of immigrants from elsewhere in Indonesia. This project will produce a database of Pna, including annotated transcriptions, translation, 10-hour video and audio recordings, and Pna compilation film.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2a9192a9-7a4f-40bf-bedd-227de2533a0d

    Documentation of Pna ‘oral traditons’ in Koto Keras, Kerinci, Indonesia
  • KORO JESSICA CLEARY-KEMP

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF KORO, AN OCEANIC LANGUAGE OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    This is a collection of texts from Koro, an Oceanic language spoken in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. Koro has two dialects, spoken in Papitalai and Lopohan villages, respectively. The materials in this deposit were collected by Jessica Cleary-Kemp during four field trips, totaling approximately seven months. The majority of the fieldwork was conducted in Papitalai village, on the small island of Los Negros, but some texts were also collected in the villages of Riu Riu and Lopohan, at residences at Chopon and Camp 5, and in the garden and bush at Lohamon, near Papitalai.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e4474e52-10bb-4146-8f5f-d9269fbd5ec7

    Documentation and description of Koro, an Oceanic language of Papua New Guinea
  • KULA NICHOLAS WILLIAMS

    DOCUMENTING LANGUAGE AND INTERACTION IN KULA
    This collection includes a variety of audio, video, and written materials in Kula, a Papuan language spoken by approximately 5,000 people in the eastern highlands of Alor, Indonesia. Materials in this deposit include audio recordings of traditional narratives and personal experiences originally recorded by famed Alorese linguist Anderias Malaikosa, a native speaker of Sawila, in 2010 prior to the ELDP project. It also includes video recordings of everyday conversation, storytelling, and stimuli-based elicitation tasks made by Nicholas Williams, Penipius Mosali, and Anton Lapuimolana between 2012 and 2014, with support of an ELDP grant. These materials were collected as part of an effort to document everyday use of Kula before language shift progresses further in the community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/020426e9-bffc-42da-9f8c-b67c1160a0f9

    Documenting Language and Interaction in Kula
  • KARO NILSON GABAS JR.

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF KARO, BRAZIL
    This collection aims to document and continue the description of Karo, a Tupian language spoken by approximately 130 Arara Indians in the Amazon region of Brazil. Although Karo is still the first language acquired by children, the small number of its speakers places Karo in danger of extinction.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3cae5657-34a1-40ca-8fa1-f5dd2c1de33e

  • LAKURUMAU LIDIA FEDERICA MAZZITELLI

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF LAKURUMAU
    The project entails the documentation and description of Lakurumau, an Austronesian language spoken in one village in New Ireland (Papua New Guinea) by approximatively 800 people. The community is multilingual in Lakuramau, Tok Pisin (the vehicular language) and the two neighbouring languages Kara and Nalik. Lakuramau is threatened: most children have a good passive knowledge of it, but not a good active one. Until now, Lakurumau has never been documented, nor described. The project aims at filling this gap through the compilation of a representative audio-video corpus of Lakurumau, a grammatical sketch and a collection of traditional stories.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e85ad12e-f2a7-46ed-8fdb-2327dbff281d

    Documentation and Description of Lakurumau
  • KA'APOR SIGN LANGUAGE VITóRIA ANIZ, GUSTAVO GODOY

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF KA’APOR SIGN LANGUAGE
    Although linguists and anthropologists have known about its existence for the last decades, very few efforts have been made to document and understand the Ka'apor sign language. It is estimated that between 7 and 13 deaf people use the language currently inside the Ka'apor indigenous villages in Maranhão (Brazil). Considering the size of the speaking community and the restrictiveness of language transmission, it is vital for the future of UKS that more research and data collection are made around it. This project aims to register the speech of UKS users in a multitude of environments, situations and conversational dynamics.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/891c8b8e-f3d3-446c-b57b-025c484b46b3

  • UMAR, MOOR, YERISIAM, YAUR DAVID KAMHOLZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF MOOR, YERISIAM, YAUR, AND UMAR
    This deposit documents four Austronesian languages of southern Cenderawasih Bay (Papua province, Indonesia): Moor, Yerisiam, Yaur, and Umar. It was collected by David Kamholz, linguist and principal investigator, as part of his doctoral research into the history of the South Halmahera-West New Guinea (SHWNG) subgroup of Austronesian. The historical-comparative nature of this research led to particular emphasis on the lexicon, morphological paradigms, and capturing tonal contrasts. The recordings also include a significant quantity of storytelling, naturalistic conversation, other texts, and music.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c8475906-dbe4-42aa-b09b-bfbcb9765b28

  • JU|'HOAN MEGAN BIESELE

    DIGITAL DOCUMENTATION OF JUL'HOAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: FIELD RESEARCH FOR AUDIO, VIDEO AND TEXT ARCHIVES
    The =X’ao-||’aen language [aue], also known as |Auen and Auen, is spoken by about 2000 San in Omaheke province of Namibia and by 2000 San in Ghanzi district in neighbouring Botswana. =X’ao-||’aen is a Naro exonym meaning “Northern People”. Community members define themselves as “Ju|’hoan” (true people). Linguists consider Ju a language-complex as there are no clear boundaries between the different dialects. This project is an ongoing documentation of the Ju|’hoan language, begun by Biesele in 1970, that is now a community-based initiative: the Ju|’hoan Transcription Group (JTG). This deposit includes transcriptions, lessons, 27 video recordings, 150 audio recordings and a dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5857d8bc-0fb8-4628-8bdc-fc5a06defe2b

    Digital Documentation of Jul'hoan Language and Culture: Field research for Audio, Video and Text Archives
  • VAMALE JEAN ROHLEDER

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF VAMALE, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF NEW CALEDONIA
    Vamale is among the smallest languages of New Caledonia, with around 100 speakers. It is almost undescribed. Most Vamale communities were displaced in the early 1900s from their mountains in the north and have since only had sporadic contact with their linguistic cousins, instead coexisting with other languages. This project aims for a cooperation with speakers to document the language and the culture, through annotated film and audio recordings. The data will be used for a sketch grammar, a dictionary, and pedagogical materials. The corpus will include naturally occurring speech, but also culturally relevant genres, such as tales and songs.
     
    Access Collection here:
    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/044967e0-e54e-4f00-a979-fb751b2e66cf

    Documentation and description of Vamale, an endangered language of New Caledonia
  • CHAMACOCO, TOMáRâHO TRACY CARRO DE NOYA

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE TOMARâHO VARIETY OF CHAMACOCO, PARAGUAY
    This collection includes an initial documentation of the Tomaraho variety of Chamacoco, spoken by approximately 180 people living in the settlement known as Puerto Maria Elena-Petintouta (20°45’S, 57°56’W), Paraguay. It contains recordings of narratives important to the community members, such as personal stories, accounts of how their way of life has changed, descriptions of traditional activities, and mythological stories.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e32c74a4-ea25-4c23-b947-aa60d479a217

    Documentation of the Tomarâho variety of Chamacoco, Paraguay
  • CAAC AURéLIE CAUCHARD

    DOCUMENTING CAAC, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE SPOKEN IN THE NORTH OF NEW CALEDONIA
    The project has documented Caac (ISO 639-3 msq), a Southern Oceanic language spoken by the Mwelebeng people (1050 speakers in 2003) living in the region of Hoot ma Waap, northern New Caledonia. The corpus of audio data is transcribed, annotated and translated with an emphasis on spatial expressions in Caac.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e20df111-c6e0-4ade-84c6-491cea7058cf

    Documenting Caac, an endangered language spoken in the north of New Caledonia
  • HAMéA ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, CLAIRE MOYSE-FAURIE

    RECORDINGS OF HAMEA: AN AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN NEW CALEDONIA
    Haméa is a language spoken in the high valley of the Kouaoua river, on the east coast of New Caledonia’s Grande Terre, by 300 speakers at most. This deposit consists of videos collected in 2010 through a program on endangered languages called “Sorosoro” and includes traditional vocabulary, commentary on traditional society and activities, historical narratives, traditional folktales, and a song about coffee.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0b44bb34-30d4-4b83-8153-bd698bb279ef

  • BOLIVIAN GUARANí WINDY DAVIET

    A PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION OF BOLIVIAN GUARANí
    Bolivian Guaraní is a Tupi-Guaraní language spoken in the South East of Bolivia. This language is spoken by around 40.000 speakers, but it is threatened, because younger speakers are switching to Spanish. This collaborative project with the community has three aims: first, a preliminary documentation of Bolivian Guaraní, consisting of an open-access archive of a 4-hour audio and video database including traditional stories; second, a thematic glossary of terms for tools (agricultural, hunting and building tools), for the use of the community; and third, a Master thesis consisting of a sociolinguistic report and a revision of the phonological analysis.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/65aac58b-4607-40e8-9d31-191765b8125a

  • XâRâGURè ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, CLAIRE MOYSE-FAURIE

    RECORDINGS OF XâRâGURè: AN AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN NEW CALEDONIA
    Xârâgurè is an Austronesian language belonging to the Southern New Caledonian subgroup, with about 600 speakers above the age of 14. This Xârâgurè deposit includes video recordings of traditional activities, body part vocabulary, considerations about the Xârâgurè speakers, several traditional tales, and two songs.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8a1214bf-fad7-41d5-aba8-b963f42d62fe

    Recordings of Xârâgurè: An Austronesian language of Southern New Caledonia
  • NIVACLé, CHOROTE, KADIWéU LYLE CAMPBELL, VERONICA GRONDONA

    AUDIO AND VIDEO RECORDINGS OF CHOROTE, NIVAKLé (CHULUPí), AND MAKá, LANGUAGES OF SOUTHERN CHACO
    This collection is the result of a three-year documentation project of Chorote, Nivaclé and Kadiwéu, three poorly known endangered languages of southern Chaco (South America). Three specific needs guide the research in this project: the need for documentation, not only in printed form but also audio and audiovisual; the need for comparative and historical studies of the Matacoan and Guaycuruan languages; and the need for revitalisation efforts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/966725b9-8ebc-4a98-9177-3528164a3aac

  • ARANDIC MYFANY TURPIN

    ARANDIC SONGS: ABORIGINAL VERBAL ART IN CENTRAL AUSTRALIA
    This project records and documents songs from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia as a resource for maintaining traditions and for appropriate research. It records Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and describes the linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. The project assists elders in maintaining their traditional verbal art forms by providing an opportunity for younger and older people to participate in the performances and their documentation, and by producing accessible resources of this material for community use.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/33591996-4dff-4ce1-937a-e33c3df40e79

    Arandic songs: Aboriginal verbal art in Central Australia
  • NIVACLé ANALíA GUTIéRREZ

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NIVACLE DIALECTS
    This collection includes material on linguistic documentation, description and analysis of phonetic and morphophonological variation among Nivacle speakers. Fieldwork was primarily carried out in the Nivacle communities of Uj’e Lhavos and Santa Teresita (Department of Boqueron, Paraguay). The deposit includes a corpus of transcribed, annotated and analyzed audio recordings consisting of a variety of discourse genres (narratives, myths, conversations, and procedural texts), and paradigmatically related sets of data (i.e., verbal and nominal paradigms, morpho-syntactic markers in various sentential contexts aimed to elucidate their functional differences, phonological segments in different contexts in order to explore constraints on their different surface realizations, etc.).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/71c8a0f7-d1a3-48a0-8acc-94e1b601635b

    Documentation and description of Nivacle dialects
  • SANAPANá JENS VAN GYSEL

    A DOCUMENTATION OF HISTORICAL NARRATIVES AMONGST THE SANAPANá (ENLHET-ENENLHET) OF THE PARAGUAYAN CHACO
    Sanapaná is an underdocumented language from the Enlhet-Enenlhet family, spoken in the Paraguayan departments Boquerón and Presidente Hayes. It has around 1000 native speakers (a third of the ethnic group), mainly in La Esperanza, the fieldwork site for this project, and Anaconda. Only in these communities is the language still transmitted to children. This project aims to initiate a documentation of Sanapaná historical narratives, particularly concerning the colonisation of the Chaco from a Sanapaná perspective. In order to capture different registers of language use, monologues, dialogues and conversations in larger groups will be video and audiorecorded.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7aa154dd-cfb0-4850-a690-d7c0c9e81634

    A documentation of historical narratives amongst the Sanapaná (Enlhet-Enenlhet) of the Paraguayan Chaco
  • AYOREO SANTIAGO GABRIEL DURANTE

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF PARAGUAYAN AYOREO, A LANGUAGE OF THE CHACO
    Ayoreo [ayo] is a Zamucoan language with approximately 4,000 speakers in Bolivia and 2,600 speakers in Paraguay. The language remains under-described, especially the Paraguayan varieties. This project documents the Ayoreo spoken in Campo Loro, Paraguay, through recordings and annotations of a range of culturally significant text materials in collaboration with the community. The main outcome is a doctoral thesis, which includes an Ayoreo sketch grammar with a detailed analysis of its clause structure and the production of materials for community use.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/65811658-55d4-4281-965c-4a4178dcc1be

    Documentation and description of paraguayan Ayoreo, a language of the Chaco
  • TSHWA LEE PRATCHETT

    A DISCOURSE-BASED DOCUMENTATION OF SAN VARIETIES IN THE WESTERN SANDVELD REGION (CENTRAL DISTRICT, BOTSWANA)
    The Western Sandveld Region, in Central District, Botswana, is host to several highly endangered and unrelated 'Khoisan' languages spoken by San foragers of the Kalahari. Furthermore, ethnographic references from the 70s suggest completely undiscovered languages may still exist in the region. This project focuses on the documentation and description of Tshwa, a barely described East Kalahari Khoe language of the Khoe-Kwadi family (approx. 900 speakers). The project aims to create a diverse and culturally rich corpus of natural discourse, and a sociolinguistic study to shed light on the linguistic heritage of this part of the Kalahari.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cb5aca04-a13f-4ec3-94d8-a8478778413a

    A discourse-based documentation of San varieties in the Western Sandveld Region (Central district, Botswana)
  • ENXET SUR JOHN ELLIOTT

    THE ENXET DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Enxet Sur is an Enlhet-Enenlhet (Maskoyan) language of roughly 4,000 speakers spread across several communities in the department of Presidente Hayes in the Paraguayan Chaco. The purpose of this project is to create annotated audio-video recordings of Enxet with a focus on traditional use of plants and animals, to set up a lexical database and to begin detailed structural analysis for the enrichment of a more long term the grant project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/308aad78-da27-4716-a668-472149d89e4b

    The Enxet Documentation Project
  • SASI CHRIS COLLINS

    DOCUMENTING SASI
    The PI will document the Sasi (huc) language spoken by fifteen remaining elderly speakers in two villages in eastern Botswana, Mokgenene and Poloka. The documentation will focus on video footage of the remaining speakers using their language. The video footage will be transcribed, glossed and translated using FLEx and ELAN. All materials will be archived at ELAR and also made available on an easy to use public internet portal.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cf01dbc6-fe0b-4167-aac0-5cfbfae2abec

  • IYOJWA’JA NICHOLAS DRAYSON

    CHOROTE-SPANISH DICTIONARY
    This collection describes Iyojwa’ja (Chorote), a Matako-Mataguayo language spoken in Salta Province, Argentina. This collection includes a Chorote-Spanish dictionary with references to word class, variations of meaning, plural and feminine forms, cross-references, cultural clarifications, examples of usage, alternative grammatical forms, scientific classification and appendices with a grammar outline, placenames, neighbouring languages and geographical data.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/56cbb03d-b2d0-4301-bbb0-23f739931919

  • AUSLAN TREVOR JOHNSTON

    CORPUS OF GRAMMAR AND DISCOURSE STRATEGIES OF DEAF NATIVE USERS OF AUSLAN (AUSTRALIAN SIGN LANGUAGE)
    Auslan (Australian Sign Language) is the native signed language of the deaf community in Australia. It has evolved from forms of British Sign Language, which were brought to Australia in the 19th century. The purpose of this project is to secure a corpus of digital video recordings of naturalistic, controlled and elicited Auslan from deaf native signers, before finding reasonable numbers of such signers becomes increasingly difficult. The number of deaf users of Auslan peaked in the early 1980s at approximately 6,500 and entered a period of decline in the mid 1990s. Predictions are that this decline is accelerating though aging and decreasing incidence rates of permanent early childhood severe and profound deafness and, thus, in the number of new signers. Within a generation the language community may cease to be viable and a relatively ‘old’ and established signed language will be permanently lost to linguistic science. The corpus will support initial and future corpus-based grammatical description of the language and serve as a basis for comparison with emerging signed languages in newly created deaf communities in the developing world.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d8a991a5-d8cc-4f85-a5ff-c37279ebb625

    Corpus of grammar and discourse strategies of deaf native users of Auslan (Australian Sign Language)
  • MOCOVí CRISTIAN R. JUáREZ

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NORTHERN CHACO MOCOVí (GUAYCURUAN, ARGENTINA)
    This project seeks to document and describe Northern Chaco Mocoví (NCM), an underexplored variety of Mocoví, a Guaycuruan language from the Argentine Gran Chaco region. The study of NCM communities offers a new sociolinguistic context for developing a thorough, multimodal, and accessible documentation of Mocoví, with a strong emphasis on video documentation. Additionally, a typologically informed morphosyntactic description of argument structure alternations in NCM will expand our understanding of Mocoví dialectal variation and its motivations. In close collaboration with Mocoví community members, this project will also develop pedagogical materials for educational purposes and Mocoví promotion in Chaco.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1a1bb17d-1e46-4f01-bb5e-6b0fbe39af18

    Documentation and Description of Northern Chaco Mocoví (Guaycuruan, Argentina)
  • N|UU SHEENA SHAH

    DOCUMENTATION FOR THE REVITALISATION OF N|UU
    The deposit contains audio-video recordings primarily of Katrina Esau, one of the few last speakers of the N|uu language. Since 2012, on request by the community, linguists from the Centre for African Language Diversity (CALDi) at the University of Cape Town have been involved in documenting the N|uu language for revitalisation purposes, and specifically for producing learning and teaching materials that can be used by Katrina to teach N|uu in her school, Staar na die Sterre (‘Gazing at the Stars’).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/90c565ba-170e-4784-a1a3-1225cb9d1ea4

    Documentation for the revitalisation of N|uu
  • N|UU BONNY SANDS, CHRIS COLLINS

    DESCRIPTION OF N|UU
    Recordings of dictionary entries for a pan-dialectal dictionary of the N|uu language (Eastern and Western dialects) made by Bonny Sands, Johanna Brugman, Amanda Miller, Chris Collins and Levi Namaseb in Upington, South Africa. Also included are recordings of sentences and oral texts collected for the grammatical sketch.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/247206a5-04d2-4216-8a84-68d972832773

    Description of N|uu
  • N|UU TOM GüLDEMANN, ALENA WITZLACK-MAKAREVICH

    TEXT DOCUMENTATION OF N|UU
    N|uu is the last South African San language and the only surviving member of the !Ui branch of the isolate Tuu language family. The N|uu language is highly endangered, having less than 10 known elderly speakers. This deposit consists of about 22 hours of audio material from these remaining 10 speakers. The deposit consists mainly of texts like folktales, personal stories, and conversations in N|uu, but also includes several elicitation sessions for obtaining vocabulary and grammatical structures.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4558585e-56ab-4e60-8d8d-5857b2bb96a3

  • KORANA MENAN DU PLESSIS

    COLLECTION OF SOUND FILES FOR INCLUSION IN A DICTIONARY OF KORANA AND EVENTUAL INTEGRATION WITH A CORPUS OF HERITAGE TEXTS.
    The collection includes sound files of Korana, or !Ora, a South African Khoesan language of the Khoe family, which may be the direct descendant of the variety spoken by inhabitants of the Cape when Europeans first arrived. It was believed extinct until the recent discovery of four elderly speakers around Bloemfontein and Kimberley. The files will be incorporated into an electronic dictionary, and ultimately integrated with a text corpus. This is part of a greater project to produce a compendium – in print and online – with historical background, grammatical information, heritage texts with parallel translations, and a dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c3405566-3681-4567-9830-7390c00bfc68

  • AUSTRALIAN IRISH SIGN LANGUAGE ROBERT ADAM

    AUSTRALIAN IRISH SIGN LANGUAGE: A MINORITY SIGN LANGUAGE WITHIN A LARGER SIGN LANGUAGE COMMUNITY
    Australian Irish Sign Language (AISL) is a minority sign language within a minority sign language community, brought to Australia from, Ireland in 1875 by a group of Dominican nuns (including a Deaf nun). Three schools used this as a language of instruction, all of which discontinued using AISL in the early 1950s. Most signers are in their early seventies onwards and they number 100 although there may be younger Deaf and hearing native signers who had Deaf parents. The last dictionary was published in 1942.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/04a3d3ea-202a-4407-a5d2-9c302f05fd62

    Australian Irish Sign Language: a minority sign language within a larger sign language community
  • FAS, MOMU TOM HONEYMAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF MOMU, SANDAUN PROVINCE, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    This collection consist of a corpus of materials on the Fas (or Momu as it is referred to locally) language. Fas is spoken in Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea. There are approximately 5000 speakers spread across 19 villages. The majority of work was carried out in Mori and Savamui village, in the north-east of that region.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/40938fd4-6921-4eb3-aa35-85dd26b05128

  • WALMAN MATTHEW DRYER, LEA BROWN

    LINGUISTIC FIELDWORK IN SANDUAN PROVINCE, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    Walman, or Valman, is a Papuan language from the Torricelli family spoken on the north coast of Papua New Guinea, where there has been close contact and frequent fighting with Austronesian groups for at least two centuries. This deposit comprises audio files and transcriptions, some video files with transcription of the audio component, a draft dictionary and grammar, as well as copies of the depositors’ fieldnotes. Genres include narration, conversation, and elicitation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d2435196-01a1-4f7a-afc6-4ac2078080ca

    Linguistic Fieldwork in Sanduan Province, Papua New Guinea
  • GWENO ALEXANDRINE DUNLAP

    A DOCUMENTATION OF GWENO: SUBSISTENCE AND TRADITIONS AMONG THE HILLS OF KILIMANJARO
    Gweno (ISO 639-3 gwe) is a highly endangered Bantu (E65) language spoken by about 2,500 speakers in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Transmission of the language to children is extremely limited as the community is shifting to Swahili and Asu. This project focuses on documenting the subsistence strategy of cattle herding and recently developed agricultural practices, which are central to Gweno culture, producing a rich multimodal corpus with time-aligned transcriptions, annotation, translation of video recordings, and a collection of specialized vocabulary. The corpus will feed into descriptive work on verbal predicates for Alexandrine Dunlap's master's thesis.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e169cd7b-e461-4008-a7e6-7e651b387e6d

    A documentation of Gweno: subsistence and traditions among the hills of Kilimanjaro
  • ARO ANDREY DRINFELD

    DOCUMENTATION OF ARO [TEI], A TORRICELLI LANGUAGE OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    The goal of this project is the documentation of Aro [tei] (which is listed under the name 'Torricelli' in Ethnologue and some other sources). The Aro language is spoken by around 520 people in the Sandaun Province of Papua New Guinea. It belongs to the Kombio sub-branch of the Kombio-Arapesh branch of the Torricelli family. Whereas the Arapesh branch of the Kombio-Arapesh branch is well documented, the Kombio branch is underdescribed. This documentation project will result in the first major documentation and book-length description of any language of the Kombio branch.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b386963f-6236-4149-9acd-c20fe19e372a

    Documentation of Aro [tei], A Torricelli language of Papua New Guinea
  • ASIMJEEG DATOOGA RICHARD THOMAS GRISCOM

    DOCUMENTATION OF ISIMJEEG DATOOGA
    Asimjeeg Datooga is an endangered language variety of the Southern Nilotic family, spoken by approximately 3,000 people in North-Central Tanzania. The three main components of this documentary collection include: audio-visual recordings that are representative of a spectrum of variation across the various Asimjeeg Datooga communities, a tri-lingual dictionary and FLEx lexicon, and a sketch grammar. The collection includes approximately 140 hours of recordings of over 60 different speakers from four different communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1e9151d8-df0a-4ea7-bb6d-377b65b14310

  • ALLANG MICHAEL EWING

    LINGUISTIC DATA OF THE ALLANG LANGUAGE
    This deposit records three languages from Allang village, Ambon Island, Indonesia: Allang, Wakasihu and Larike. The deposit consists of audio materials recorded in Allang village from 2004-2006. As the languages were no longer used spontaneously by speakers, no completely naturalistic data was available. Recordings are primarily elicitation sessions, augmented by elicited narratives, stage discussions, and some conversational material.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8de8b260-2800-4bf5-a98c-7982eef204a8

    Linguistic data of the Allang language
  • APURINã SIDNEY FACUNDES

    DESCRIPTION OF APURINã (ARAWAK)
    Apurina belongs to the Arawak family, with a few hundreds of speakers scattered along the tributaries of the Purus river basin, in Northwestern Brazilian Amazon. The collection here includes a preliminary sketch of the grammar of the language, a lexicon for fauna and flora and a few texts transcribed and interlinearized.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4ad42d29-6134-4c9e-8535-2a394677ba20

  • BARUPU MIRIAM CORRIS

    BARUPU GRAMMAR AND LEXICOGRAPHY
    Barupu is a previously undescribed language of the Piore River family, spoken on the north coast of New Guinea in the vicinity of Sissano lagoon, west of Aitape. It is spoken by about 2000 people living immediately south of the lagoon. This deposit consists of Toolbox dictionary files, audio files, and some time-aligned transcripts. Following the deaths of so many elderly people following the 1998 tsunami, there has been a push to preserve and pass on older people’s cultural and linguistic knowledge.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b3f6d304-b883-4d90-af2b-d38dc1b87282

  • IQUITO NORA ENGLAND, CHRISTINE BEIER

    IQUITO LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Iquito is a Zaparoan language of the Loreto department in Peruvian Amazonia, having around 25 elderly speakers (as of 2006). The principle language of communication within Iquito communities is Spanish and the use of the Iquito language is restricted to occasional private conversations between older community members. This deposit consists of a bilingual Spanish-Iquito dictionary (Iquito as spoken in Loreto, Peru). The project encompasses 13 months of active field research carried out between June 2003 and December 2006.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8d541e5d-6c9a-4f68-b2b9-da7a3aec604c

    Iquito Language Documentation Project
  • HADZA RICHARD GRISCOM, ANDREW HARVEY

    HADZA: AN ARCHIVE OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL MATERIAL FROM THE HADZABE PEOPLE OF EYASI (ARUSHA, MANYARA, SINGIDA, AND SIMIYU REGIONS, TANZANIA)
    Hadza [hts] is an endangered language isolate spoken by a community of approximately 1,000-2,000 people in northern Tanzania. This deposit contains audio-visual material collected by members of the Hadza speech community and researchers, and it constitutes the first and only open access documentary record of the Hadza language. Community participation was central to the creation of this deposit. The majority of data in the deposit was collected by community members themselves, following their own interests and goals for the documentation of their language and traditional cultural practices. The resulting documentary record is diverse both in terms of content and participants involved and reflects a wide spectrum of individuals, places, and perspectives.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0596a3fe-6eae-4f45-9091-e4937328ba03

    Hadza: an archive of language and cultural material from the Hadzabe people of Eyasi (Arusha, Manyara, Singida, and Simiyu regions, Tanzania)
  • HEYO THOMAS DIAZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF HEYO [AUK], A TORRICELLI LANGUAGE OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    The primary goal of this project is the documentation of Heyo, a Torricelli language of northwestern Papua New Guinea. Within Torricelli, Heyo is a member of the Maimai subbranch. To date there are no descriptions or published documentation of a Maimai language. Heyo is spoken by between 500 and 1,500 people across three wards in Sandaun Province in the Torricelli Mountains. Due to the widespread shift from traditional languages to the lingua franca Tok Pisin, the number of Heyo speakers is in a state of decline. However, many adults continue to use the language in their daily lives.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/18d3c47e-db5b-492c-853f-1a000aa19606

    Documentation of Heyo [auk], a Torricelli language of Papua New Guinea
  • KANDOZI-CHAPRA (CANDOSHI-SHAPRA) SIMON OVERALL

    DOCUMENTATION OF KANDOZI AND CHAPRA (CANDOSHI-SHAPRA) IN LORETO, PERU
    The Chapra and Kandozi communities number about 3,255 people, living in the Western Amazon Basin in Loreto, Peru. The communities are under threat from epidemic diseases and pollution from oil extraction activities. The two groups speak mutually intelligible varieties of a single language, which is not known to be related to any other linguistic group. This project aims to complement ongoing work on the description of Kandozi-Chapra. In addition to the academic benefits, we hope to help the community document traditional knowledge that is under threat from a changing lifestyle.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b4ea01fd-75b3-4e40-8718-ce84af42a756

    Documentation of Kandozi and Chapra (Candoshi-Shapra) in Loreto, Peru
  • SIPHUTHI SHEENA SHAH

    A MULTI-MEDIA DIGITAL CORPUS OF SIPHUTHI
    The siPhuthi multimedia digital corpus contains primary language data of different genres recorded in different settings. The deposit includes audio-video recordings from speakers of various ages depicting current use of siPhuthi. The collected modern language data will be supplemented by digitised, curated and archived audio recordings from the mid-90s (collected by Dr. Simon Donnelly), the latter allowing for a glimpse into the cultural and linguistic past of a rapidly changing and diminishing language community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ebca9f1e-c73c-4d22-8ed8-3abcb2d51ffa

    A multi-media digital corpus of siPhuthi
  • CHEDUNGUN (MAPUDUNGUN) PABLO FUENTES

    THE PEWENCHE SUMMERLANDS: DOCUMENTING CHEDUNGUN
    Chedungun is an endangered Mapudungun variety, used by approximately 5,000 Pewenche speakers in the Andean valleys of south-central Chile. In contrast to other groups within the Mapuche universe, the Pewenche carry out a migratory lifestyle. This is manifested in the seasonal migratory journeys to the Andean summerlands, a practice that is still prevalent in some indigenous communities along the Queco river valleys. No matter how crucial for their cultural identity, though, these migratory practices are as endangered as the language use. The aim of this project is to document 16 hours of natural speech events surrounding these migratory events.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/728f34b9-55c7-4fe2-ae7c-bd029eaf8dcc

    The Pewenche Summerlands: Documenting Chedungun
  • SUDANESE LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MELBOURNE SIMON MUSGRAVE

    KNOWLEDGE OF ENDANGERED LANGUAGES IN THE SUDANESE COMMUNITY, MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA
    The primary result of this project is a report giving detailed information about the linguistic make-up of the Sudanese community in Melbourne, especially the presence of speakers of endangered languages. This material is made available as a report which has been distributed within the Sudanese community and to interested government and non-government bodies.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2310daea-4c20-453b-8907-d83c6bd23422

  • KOKAMA-KOKAMILLA ROSA VALLEJOS

    THE KUKAMA-KUKAMIRIA DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Kukama-Kukamiria is a deeply endangered language spoken in the Peruvian Amazon by approximately 1500 people. The remaining fluent speakers of the language are mostly older than 60 years, are spread out across various small villages, and speak the language in very restricted situations. There are few monolinguals, and natural processes of language transmission have been interrupted by speakers shifting to Amazonian Spanish. This deposit includes traditional stories, stories from daily life, personal experiences, spontaneous conversations, procedural texts, songs, etc. Speakers were interviewed individually, in pairs, and in groups.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1d8216b9-dc8d-4827-a44b-89bfc1d61c18

    The Kukama-Kukamiria Documentation Project
  • YAWUNO TENEYO JOSEPH BROOKS

    DOCUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF YAWUNO TENEYO LINGUISTIC PRACTICES
    This project will build an audiovisual collection of Yawuno Teneyo linguistic practices. Yawuno Teneyo is spoken in the West Range region in Papua New Guinea with about 480 speakers. It is a member of the Left May family, and this project would be the first to document a Left May language. The documentation will focus on natural language use in interactive settings including Yawuno Teneyo, Tok Pisin and code-switching.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5b7c3876-d792-46a5-8096-c9eebe777327

    Documentation and analysis of Yawuno Teneyo linguistic practices
  • DATOOGA ALICE MITCHELL

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): DATOOGA
    This deposit contains audio and video recordings of twelve Datooga speakers conducting the Causality Across Languages discourse task. The task involved showing participants a series of short video clips to elicit event descriptions (e.g., a woman breaking an egg). Each session in the deposit corresponds with one participant. Sessions contain a compressed video recording of the participant conducting the task, an extracted WAV file, and an ELAN file with a transcription of the recording. This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0584c102-ee8a-4e47-b235-a2c752aaa95a

  • GORWAA ANDREW HARVEY

    GORWAA: AN ARCHIVE OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL MATERIAL FROM THE GORWAA PEOPLE OF BABATI (MANYARA REGION, TANZANIA)
    Gorwaa (South-Cushitic, Afro-Asiatic) is an undocumented language, spoken by approximately 15,000 individuals in Babati District, Manyara Region, Tanzania. Gorwaa is accorded no formal status in Tanzania, and is banned from use in important public domains. This project will build a corpus based on culturally rich oral arts including stories, riddles, prayers and songs, which will be used for further documentation and descriptive work. The project will culminate in the completion of my PhD thesis: a detailed examination of the noun phrase which will lay the foundation for the future creation of a Gorwaa reference grammar and dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fc785a31-6f0e-4286-9592-5af9c0949986

    Gorwaa: an archive of language and cultural material from the Gorwaa people of Babati (Manyara Region, Tanzania)
  • ISANZU (IHANZU) ANDREW HARVEY

    IHANZU: AN ARCHIVE OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL MATERIAL FROM THE IHANZU PEOPLE OF MKALAMA (SINGIDA REGION, TANZANIA)
    Ihanzu (isn) (Bantu, Niger-Congo) is an undocumented language, spoken by approximately 26,000 individuals in Mkalama District, Singida Region, Tanzania. The focus of research has been to help create a description of the Ihanzu language. Materials therefore include lexical and grammatical elicitation. A second priority has been the collection of historical and cultural material deemed important to the Ihanzu people. As such, traditional songs, stories, and common history also form a significant part of the deposit.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/99335514-7925-4a8e-b493-ef0ad18583a2

  • QAQET BAINING BIRGIT HELLWIG

    LANGUAGE SOCIALISATION AND THE TRANSMISSION OF QAQET BAINING (PAPUA NEW GUINEA): TOWARDS A DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    Qaqet is spoken by 6000 speakers in Papua New Guinea in highly multilingual settings. These settings have consequences for the transmission - and hence the long-term survival - of the language: children in coastal villages no longer grow up with Qaqet as their dominant language, while children in interior villages speak Qaqet dominantly only until school age. This pilot project will aim to collect a preliminary corpus of sociolinguistic information, child-directed speech and children’s narratives. This corpus will form the basis for a future comprehensive documentation of language socialisation and transmission practices, which will enable us to better understand how languages can become endangered.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b0dbb431-a51e-4988-8a52-106d9d4f1406

  • URARINA KNUT OLAWSKY

    LANGUAGE AND CULTURE OF THE URARINA PEOPLE
    Urarina is a language isolate spoke by less than 3000 people in the Province of Loreto, Peru. Recent contact with oil companies and traders has led to cultural loss and linguistic shift to Spanish in some communities. This deposit includes recordings of 126 texts, resulting from fieldwork undertaken between 2003 to 2005. The texts include a wide range of genres such as conversations, picture descriptions, instructions, sermons, and a range of narratives. The deposit also contains music recordings, literacy materials, wordlists and video footage.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1593741c-48ca-4345-a4d3-edef6eabe250

    Language and Culture of the Urarina People
  • ULWA RUSSELL BARLOW

    DOCUMENTATION OF ULWA, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    Ulwa is an undocumented and severely endangered language spoken by about 600 people in the East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea. It belongs to a family of three films, about which essentially nothing has been published. Building on the researcher's pilot study of the language, this project will provide the first the grant and description of an otherwise unknown language. The project will result in a rich and accessibly archived corpus of digital audio and transcribed texts, video recordings of sociocultural value, and a reference grammar of theoretical import, all of which may be used to help preserve the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cffec915-d63a-4482-a0c7-bb606c504b2a

    Documentation of Ulwa, an endangered language of Papua New Guinea
  • AWIAKAY DARJA HOENIGMAN

    LANGUAGE VARIATION AND SOCIAL IDENTITY IN KANJIMEI, EAST SEPIK PROVINCE, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    This collection documents speech varieties (definable registers) in Awiakay, and their relation to the overall social scene. It includes recordings, transcripts and analyses of lexical substitution registers such as ‘mountain talk’ and ‘hidden talk’, language of disputes and fighting, language used in Catholic charismatic activities, including spirit possession, laments, and all-night song/dance cycles, together with traditional knowledge necessary for understanding their use. Documentation of all speech varieties is accompanied with observational ethnographic films.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3e788cdb-8886-493c-8151-aeea0038969e

    Language Variation and Social Identity in Kanjimei, East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea
  • MANEP, BAREM, WASKIA ANDREW PICK

    GILDIPASI LANGUAGE PROJECT: TUMBUNA STORIES AND TUMBUNA KNOWLEDGE
    This project documents the linguistic practices of the Gildapasi community in Madang province, Papua New Guinea. There are four languages indigenous to Gildipasi, all of which are poorly documented and endangered. Through recordings of narratives, interviews, group dialogues, and bush walks, we document two realms of knowledge important to Gildipasi community members: tumbuna stories, traditional stories connecting language communities to the landscape, and tumbuna knowledge, the knowledge of traditional practices for living off the land, such as traditional medicine, canoe-building, and hunting practices.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3b201978-af28-4871-8655-ab6e0e42d5cf

    Gildipasi language project: tumbuna stories and tumbuna knowledge
  • NASAL BRADLEY MCDONNELL

    DOCUMENTATION OF NASAL: AN OVERLOOKED MALAYO-POLYNESIAN ISOLATE OF SOUTHWEST SUMATRA
    Nasal is an endangered Malayo-Polynesian isolate spoken by 3,000 speakers in southwest Sumatra. While reference to Nasal first appeared in Dutch colonial documents as early as 1887, the language only received an ISO code in 2008 and is absent from any survey of Austronesian languages in the last century. This overlooked Malayo-Polynesian isolate is quite simply the least documented language of Sumatra and its outer islands. This project will produce a 10-houraudiovisual corpus of Nasal, part of which will be enriched with time-aligned transcriptions and translations and glosses in English and Indonesian.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1431785d-0439-4a41-b347-c2612585ae67

  • MEAKAMBUT DARJA HOENIGMAN

    MEAKAMBUT WAYS OF SPEAKING: AUDIO-VISUAL DOCUMENTATION OF COMMUNICATION PRACTICES IN A SMALL SEMI-NOMADIC HUNTER-AND-GATHERER SOCIETY IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    The Meakambut are semi-nomadic hunters and gatherers, numbering about 60, moving between rock shelters around their mountainous territory in East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. As one of very few semi-nomadic groups in Melanesia, they are key for understanding the (socio)linguistic situation which would have prevailed before agriculture. Apart from basic word lists there has been no prior research on the language, and it is not even listed in Ethnologue. Using observational filming to supplement basic linguistic documentation, this project will provide audio-visual documentation and analysis of a variety of their speech practices, embedded in rich ethnographic data.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/962989ef-7d37-4d3d-8dcf-0d1439e5c077

  • MATUKAR PANAU DANIELLE BARTH

    MATUKAR PANAU CORPUS BUILDING FOR THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE USE IN CONTEXT
    Matukar Panau is a highly endangered Oceanic language spoken near Madang, Papua New Guinea. Although most children are no longer learning Matukar Panau, current speakers (approx. 300) form a vibrant community of multilingual speakers in dense social networks. As an Oceanic language on the PNG coast, Matukar Panau has many interesting Papuan features. No language of this area has a large corpus available. This project will produce 47 hours of audio-visual recordings and a 200,000+ word corpus. Recordings will focus on conversations where participants are varied by age, gender, clan, social connections and differing language portfolios to document speaker interaction.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/440f3aeb-178d-469f-9fd9-7c37643cee62

    Matukar Panau corpus building for the study of language use in context
  • MAGI, BONGU, KULSAB, SIRVA, MAND, SIRVA, KURSAV, GANTS, MANAT, AISI, AREN, JILIM, SOQ DON DANIELS

    DOCUMENTING THE SOGERAM LANGUAGE FAMILY OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    This project documented six languages of the Sogeram family, spoken in Madang Province, Papua New Guinea, and reconstructed the grammar of Proto-Sogeram (a Trans New Guinea subgroup). The languages investigated were Gants, Mand, Manat, Sirva, Aisi, and Kursav. All six are endangered, and two (Mand and Kursav) are spoken by ten or fewer elderly speakers. After the Sogeram project was completed in 2014, three additional languages were added to this collection: Bongu, Jilim, and Soq. The project focused on recordings of spontaneous speech, interlinear transcriptions, and targeted grammatical elicitation, with the goal of producing as large and diverse a corpus, and as complete a description, as is possible for each language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7134e78b-2d4d-416c-80c0-d53657afc9f6

    Documenting the Sogeram Language Family of Papua New Guinea
  • CHINI JOSEPH BROOKS

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHINI LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    Chini is an undocumented and severely endangered language of the Ramu family spoken by about 75 people in inland Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Most Ramu languages are undocumented and endangered. This project includes six months of fieldwork and another six months of digitization, annotation, and analysis in order to: construct a corpus of the Andamang dialect of Chini; enhance community pride in the language; contribute to a doctoral dissertation on a topic in Chini grammar of importance to linguistic theory; and increase our understanding of the typological characteristics of and historical relationships between the languages of the Sepik-Ramu region.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/459325e7-659d-4d58-bd79-9377acd4bd1c

    Documentation of Chini language and culture
  • TOK PISIN, MAWAK, IPILI, OGEA, ENGA, IATMUL, KUMAN, MALAS, UNSERDEUTSCH NICK THIEBERGER

    DIGITISING TAPES FROM MADANG, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    This is a collection of tapes made by various people over time and then deposited with the library at the Divine Word University. They represent at least nine languages of PNG and also the German pidgin Unserdeutsch. The tapes are being stored in an environment that is not completely climate controlled and mold has affected some. Other tapes date from the 1960s and are records of local oral tradition. There are few records of most of the 900 or more languages of PNG so it is important to ensure each recording is playable and findable.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/def31dec-a869-4385-9876-fdc40477f0e9

    Digitising tapes from Madang, Papua New Guinea
  • RATSUA STEPHEN LOGAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF RATSUA (AUTONOMOUS REGION OF BOUGAINVILLE, P.N.G.)
    This collection is the outcome of a language documentation project on Ratsua, previously identified as a dialect of Hahon, in order to determine its degree of differentiation from Hahon and its sociolinguistic status. The materials in this collection include audio and video recordings as well as transcriptions, translations and analyses.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6eb950bd-4dea-4977-87b3-6e24ee6aaa55

  • KOVE HIROKO SATO

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF KOVE
    This project focuses on documenting Kove (IS0639-3:kvc), spoken in Papua New Guinea. According to the 2007 National Census, about 8,000 people live in Kove in Northeastern New Guinea (5°32'S 149°14'E). However, this number does not reflect the true number of Kove speakers because community members are rapidly losing language competence due to modernization, educational developments, and social interactions. Most fluent speakers are over 50. When complete, this collection will include a corpus of the Kove language, including a grammar, audio and video recordings of narratives, written texts, photographs, transcriptions and a small dictionary that may serve as the basis for educational materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bf37232a-d452-4c4d-af41-b0d844f5093a

  • KULINA DAVID FLECK

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE MAYORUNA LANGUAGES
    This collection documents the Mayoruna languages (Matses, Kulina and Chankuehbo) of the Panoan language family, spoken in Peru and Brazil. The collection includes annotated audio recordings, transcribed and translated into English and Spanish, of oral history narratives and other speech genres.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/24440965-fe35-49b7-820c-389095e4be19

  • PAPAPANA ELLEN SMITH

    DOCUMENTING PAPAPANA,A HIGHLY ENDANGERED NORTHWEST SOLOMONIC LANGUAGE
    Papapana belongs to the Northwest Solomonic (NWS) subgroup of the Oceanic branch of the Austronesian language family, with speakers located on Bougainville, Papua New Guinea in Teperoi village as well as the villages Peuni, Koikoi, Maras, Barora and Iraka. The contents of this deposit are associated with the doctoral research of Ellen Smith and were collected during two fieldwork trips to Bougainville: June 2011 to March 2012, and March to May 2013. The collection includes approximately 60 hours of audio recording and 5 hours of video recordings, as well as around 200 images.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4091f9ca-05a0-400e-8798-4d90c76def98

    Documenting Papapana,a highly endangered Northwest Solomonic language
  • YUWONG, DOMUNG, BONKIMAN, YOPNO JAMES SLOTTA

    DOCUMENTING YOPNO DIVERSITY: DIALECT VARIATION IN A PAPUAN LANGUAGE
    This project documents the dialects and languages spoken in a portion of the Yupna region, an area of extreme linguistic diversity within one of the most linguistically diverse countries on earth, Papua New Guinea. Although multilingualism has been an everyday fact of life in these communities, state schooling is drastically reducing local linguistic diversity. Through linguistic elicitation, interviews, and recording of interactional events, the project captures a cross-section of the variation found in a set of neighboring villages where four related languages are spoken: Bonkiman (150 speakers), Yuwong (100 speakers), Domung (2,000 speakers), and Yopno (8,000 speakers).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ae2ba3c1-7d95-4e76-9667-a4cd874dfb40

    Documenting Yopno Diversity: Dialect Variation in a Papuan Language
  • MUYU ALEXANDER ZAHRER

    DOCUMENTATION OF MUYU, A LOWLAND OK LANGUAGE OF WESTERN NEW GUINEA
    Muyu is an underdocumented language spoken by estimated 2000 people between the Kao and Muyu Rivers in the Boven-Digoel regency, Papuan Province, Indonesia. It belongs to Lowland Ok, a less studied branch of the Ok language family (Trans New Guinea). The project will include a cross-dialectal documentation from several villages resulting in a translated and annotated audio-visual corpus and a collection of texts for the community members. The data will be useful for comparative linguistics, language description and typology.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/da44eaee-10c4-46e1-8a22-6d9a26353321

    Documentation of Muyu, a Lowland Ok language of Western New Guinea
  • TEHUELCHE (AONEKKO 'A'IEN) JAVIER DOMINGO

    COMMUNICATIVE USES OF TEHUELCHE (AONEKKO ‘A’IEN) – A LANGUAGE FROM PATAGONIA
    Aonekko ‘a’ien, or Tehuelche (TEH), is a Chonic language of Argentinian Patagonia currently only known to be used by a single elderly speaker. Working with her is, therefore, a patient but fun task of elicitation which produces meaningful, yet often unexpected results. Our collaborative documentation project intends to add to the existing sparse documentation by creating a repository of common conversational language used in everyday discourse, as well as community and personal histories. This will rekindle communicative language use and be a resource for the small but persistent community who would like to reclaim their heritage language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/18cf71e4-84b5-4bfc-8de4-186b3e39a3a2

    Communicative uses of Tehuelche (Aonekko ‘a’ien) – a language from Patagonia
  • KERE ANDREA BEREZ, SAMANTHA RARRICK

    VIDEOGRAPHY-BASED DOCUMENTATION OF KERE (PAPUA NEW GUINEA) IN SOCIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
    Kere is a Chimbu-Waghi language of Simbu Province, Papua New Guinea. The primary products will be a linguistic corpus of 30 hours of transcribed, annotated video and a series of eight professional-quality short documentary films about different genres of Kere language, designed for a local and popular audience. The corpus and the film series will capture Kere language in situ with special attention to (i) the visual and locational context, (ii) the culturally salient settings, and (iii) the socially-informed and interactive nature of Kere language use.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/38d99aaa-5a59-4776-a379-7c137ee8f5c9

  • KAGULU MALIN PETZELL

    KAGULU, A BANTU LANGUAGE OF TANZANIA
    Kagulu is a minority Bantu language spoken by approximately 240,000 people in the Morogoro region of Tanzania. The autonym, i.e. what the speakers themselves call their language, is Chikagulu or Chimegi. This deposit consists of 3 recordings (2 stories and one account of daily activities), 3 annotated texts, 3 photos and a word list. Data was gathered as part of Dr. Petzell’s PhD at the University of Gothenburg.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/63daaa3b-7939-4c7c-8bd5-bc2d77666864

    Kagulu, a Bantu language of Tanzania
  • KIMBU AUGUSTINO KAGWEMA

    KIKIMBU: DOCUMENTING NOMADISM IN CENTRAL TANZANIA
    Kimbu is a Bantu, Niger-Congo language spoken across a wide swathe of west-central Tanzania by loosely-associated communities totaling no more than 62,672 (Muzale and Rugemalira 2008). Sharply decreasing numbers, sparsely-distributed population, and largely negative attitudes of speakers toward speaking Kimbu (Simons and Fenig 2018, Gabriel 2018) mean that this language is highly endangered. Additionally, there are no documentary materials available for this language whatsoever.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e7c73780-ae56-480b-b7b6-54f5f5dff6e2

  • CHIDOWE, DOWE KARSTEN LEGèRE

    DOCUMENTING THE DOWE LANGUAGE
    The Dowe language (autonym Chidowe, xenonym Kidoe, Doe) is a small Bantu language of Guthrie’s G zone. It is spoken in the hinterland of the Indian Ocean coast in some villages of Msata and Miono Ward (Bagamoyo District, Coast Region) of the United Republic of Tanzania. The collection includes material from fieldwork among Dowe people of Msata and Miono Ward (Bagamoyo District, Coast Region, United Republic of Tanzania) conducted in 2012-2013. The audio and video data deposited here are samples of rich oral traditions that were traced all over the Dowe area. In total, a wide range of speech events was recorded by the depositor as well as committed assistants such as Mr. Peter Mkwan’hembo in close cooperation with Mrisho Mkawa of Mkoko village.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7cfda163-ab96-4fa5-ab0c-027af8127fdd

    Documenting the Dowe language
  • NAGOVISI (SIBE) BETHWYN EVANS

    CLAN AND KIN AMONG THE NAGOVISI OF SOUTHERN BOUGAINVILLE, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    Nagovisi is a language of around 5,000 speakers living in small villages and hamlets in the mountainous inland region of south-western Bougainville, an island of Papua New Guinea. The island is home to speakers of at least sixteen languages from three distinct language families. Knowledge of clans and kinship relations is vital to maintaining social relationships within and across these strikingly different ethnolinguistic groups. Documenting and mapping traditional and contemporary knowledge in this domain among the Nagovisi will form a major piece in the puzzle of understanding the intertwining of language and society on Bougainville.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a5466874-8313-42e3-a2b2-cc01760fd84e

    Clan and kin among the Nagovisi of southern Bougainville, Papua New Guinea
  • KANAMARI STEFAN DIENST

    DOCUMENTATION OF KANAMARI
    Kanamari (knm) is a language of the Katukinan family spoken by 2,000 people in Brazil’s Amazon region (7°3'30"S 69°41'30"W). This deposit consists of video and audio recordings of the Kanamari language and a trilingual Toolbox dictionary. There are transcriptions and Portuguese translations of over 60 recordings and additional English translations of 16. The recordings include various types of narratives and songs, including ayahuasca ceremony songs which are partly in the Kulina language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7278e85d-1ddb-47c2-b5e6-287e2a9e4137

  • SONIA GRANT AITON

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF SONIA: AN ARCHIVE OF SONIA LANGUAGE MATERIALS FROM THE BOSAVI REGION
    This deposit will document the Sonia language, (ISO-639 SIQ), which is spoken in the Bosavi region of Papua New Guinea. Sonia is severely underdocumented, with only a preliminary word list available to date, and further documentation will be deposited in this archive as it becomes available. This research is a continuation of doctoral fieldwork at James Cook University documenting the Eibela language (ISO-636 AIL) which is also available on ELAR as deposit 0395, “The Documentation of Eibela: An archive of Eibela language materials from the Bosavi region”.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/35be5851-81cd-402e-b0d8-1b8b01836b71

  • EIBELA GRANT AITON

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF EIBELA: AN ARCHIVE OF EIBELA LANGUAGE MATERIALS FROM THE BOSAVI REGION
    This deposit documents the Eibela language, also called Aimele (ISO-639 AIL). Eibela is severely endangered, with approximately 300 speakers in Lake Campbell, Western Province, and a small number in Wawoi Falls, Western Province. Recordings in this deposit were collected in Lake Campbell and Wawoi Falls during the course of Grant Aiton’s doctoral fieldwork while writing a grammatical description of the language at James Cook University. These recordings include approximately 17 hours of transcribed speech from a variety of genres, including legends, oral histories, sermons, conversation, and song, as well as the associated linguistic analysis and description of these materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/60ee1e0d-49dd-4176-85d0-bf1fb1bdf78c

    The Documentation of Eibela: An archive of Eibela language materials from the Bosavi region
  • YAQAY BRUNO OLSSON

    DOCUMENTATION OF YAQAY, AN ANIM LANGUAGE OF PAPUA, INDONESIA
    Yaqay is an underdocumented language spoken by ca. 10000 people in the Mappi regency, Papua province, Indonesia. Yaqay belongs to the Anim language family. Languages of this family have turned out to exhibit a range of features that are unusual from a typological and areal perspective, so the documentation of Yaqay is valuable for understanding why these languages are so different from other Papuan languages. The main outcomes will be a translated and annotated video corpus and a dictionary that will be useful for both linguists and community members, as well as teaching materials that can be used in village schools.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/641d52bf-d9ca-413a-9a30-f635c8092536

    Documentation of Yaqay, an Anim language of Papua, Indonesia
  • IPIKO ZURAB BARATASHVILI

    DOCUMENTING IPIKO, AN UNDESCRIBED LANGUAGE OF PNG
    An undescribed and endangered language Ipiko is the sole representative of the Inland Gulf subgroup of the Anim group of the Trans New Guinea language family. The project aims to document the Ipiko language, collect audio and visual recordings in order to create a balanced and annotated corpus of the language, on which my doctoral dissertation about morpho-syntactic aspects of the language will be based. A sketch grammar, more detailed investigations of valency, transitivity, and argument structure should be the result of the project. These will be accompanied by a small dictionary.The outcome will be useful for descriptive, historical, typological, and Areal linguistics. It will also serve to provide the community with teaching materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3fc33c21-f48f-426b-bed0-ed784db37e04

    Documenting Ipiko, an undescribed language of PNG
  • GAVIãO, SURUI DENNIS MOORE

    LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION WITH A FOCUS ON TRADITIONAL CULTURE AMONG THE GAVIãO AND SURUí OF RONDôNIA
    The goal of the present project is the documentation of Gavião and Surui, two Mondé (Tupian) languages of Eastern Rondônia, Brazil. The project with provide support and technical assistance for these two groups to carry out the documentation of their traditional culture and the associated language. The recordings will be made available both to the native communities, constituting an encyclopedia of traditional knowledge, and to the general public, including interested researchers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/aa5ee358-ee48-489e-906c-da2eb92e15c8

    Language documentation with a focus on traditional culture among the Gavião and Suruí of Rondônia
  • ARAMMBA EMIL MITTAG

    A LINGUISTIC DESCRIPTION OF ARAMMBA, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN NEW GUINEA.
    Arammba is an endangered language spoken by less than 1,000 people in Papua New Guinea. It is part of the Tonda branch of the Morehead-Maro family of languages of Southern New Guinea, which does not appear to be related to any other family. As the number of Arammba speakers is rapidly declining, Arammba will be documented to help preserve it for future generations. Data acquired will be useful to linguists working in comparative linguistics, language description, and typology. Materials will also be created for Arammba speakers to preserve their language and teach it to others.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fac1a81c-e589-4333-a3d4-91e0eaacde10

  • SUKI CHARLOTTE VAN TONGEREN

    A VIDEO DOCUMENTATION AND STUDY OF SUKI INTERACTIVE SPEECH
    Suki is an undescribed language spoken by over 3,500 people living in the remote swampy area just south of the Fly River in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea. This project aims to video document a corpus of highly interactive, naturalistic speech, and include a study of a subset of this corpus into my PhD thesis on the grammatical structure of the language. I will teach filming and transcription skills to interested speakers, and by this have them closely involved in the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5093d46f-f466-488e-a991-7b9d9bd1971e

    A video documentation and study of Suki interactive speech
  • KUBOKOTA, LUQA MARY CHAMBERS

    DOCUMENTATION OF KUBOKOTA
    Corpus of data from Kubokota, Ranongga Island, Solomon Islands. Over 150 audio recordings, with written texts, elicitation, and fieldnotes covering traditional and personal stories and everyday events and activities. A small number of Luqa recordings are also included.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7666477b-e9dc-4c6b-a195-99af25311298

    Documentation of Kubokota
  • LUQA, SOLOMON ISLANDS PIJIN, KUBOKOTA DEBRA MCDOUGALL

    RECORDINGS AND TEXTS FROM RANONGGA, SOLOMON ISLANDS
    This project will digitise audio and video recordings and manuscripts from Ranongga, Solomon Islands. Materials include: 1) audio recordings of traditional stories made in 1986 and 1992 by Kenneth Roga and Laurence Stubbs; 2) audio-visual recordings made between 1998-2001 by by Debra McDougall, which include stories, interviews, and events; 3) texts written since 2000 by students of vernacular literacy and grammar school. A collaboration between a university-based academic and the director of a grassroots language movement called the Kulu Language Institute, the project will involve speakers of Kubokota and Luqa in the typing, transcription, and description of the collected materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/054c1a7f-83d9-4fa9-bc35-76d199a61622

  • YEI MATTHEW J. CARRROLL

    PAN-DIALECTAL DOCUMENTATION OF THE YEI LANGUAGE
    Yei is a Yam family language spoken in the Merauke region of Papua, Indonesia. It is spoken by several hundred people who live in seven villages in the border region between Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Yei’s key position as a primary branch of the Yam family makes it the crucial next step in unlocking the linguistic history of this region. The project will involve pan-dialectal documentation from all seven villages resulting in an audio-visual corpus, a general dictionary, three specialised lexicons and a collection of texts compiled into a single volume curated by the community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0f583d25-31a2-4540-8e45-078087d88097

    Pan-dialectal documentation of the Yei language
  • BLABLANGA RADU VOICA

    DOCUMENTATION OF BLABLANGA
    Blablanga is an endangered Oceanic language with 1150 speakers (2009) on Santa Isabel Island, Solomon Islands. The collection consists of an annotated corpus of digital audio and video materials, covering language use in a variety of social and cultural contexts. Descriptions of main structures have already been made available. A practical orthography has been proposed and, in collaboration with the community, a range of literacy and language maintenance materials are being developed. A full grammar, a Blablanga-English-Pijin (the Solomons variety of Melanesian Pidgin) dictionary and a more specialized publication on intonation and information structure in the language are in preparation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c24cf9c2-cd8c-44ac-80b7-e1cbf6bf3c60

    Documentation of Blablanga
  • KATA KOLOK CONNIE DE VOS

    LONGITUDINAL DOCUMENTATION OF SIGN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION IN A DEAF VILLAGE IN BALI
    Kata Kolok is a sign language indigenous to a Balinese village which has a high incidence of hereditary deafness. There are currently 48 deaf signers, and 1,200 hearing community members use Kata kolok with varying degrees of proficiency. The language is threatened by the increasing number of sign-bilinguals using Indonesian Sign Language in addition to Kata Kolok, as well as recent changes in marital patterns. This project presents a unique effort to document the acquisition of a sign language in a deaf village over an extensive period of time.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a6981929-85ab-4ff4-b2f1-f9de151fddf9

    Longitudinal Documentation of Sign Language Acquisition in a Deaf Village in Bali
  • ABUI A.L. BLAKE

    DOCUMENTING ENVIRONMENTAL KNOWLEDGE IN ABUI, A LANGUAGE OF EASTERN INDONESIA
    This project documents ecological knowledge of the Abui people. Abui (ISO 639-3 abz), a non-Austronesian language of the Alor-Pantar family of Eastern Indonesia, is likely to be much more endangered than indicated by speaker number surveys, which give figures of around 16,000. Recently, there is rapid shift to Malay among the younger generation. Focusing on the Abui nomenclature, classification, characteristics, and use of food- and medicinal- plants, this interdisciplinary project will create Abui audio- and video- recordings, with accompanying transcriptions and translations, as well as voucher specimens and high-quality photographic images of plants.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cf88ef3d-a04d-46c4-b5b3-0f662e118624

    Documenting environmental knowledge in Abui, a language of eastern Indonesia
  • TEIWA, KLON, ABUI LOUISE BAIRD

    DOCUMENTATION OF THREE ENDANGERED NON-AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES OF ALOR AND PANTAR, EASTERN INDONESIA
    All of the languages in this project are previously undescribed non-Austronesian languages spoken in the Alor archipelago in south-eastern Indonesia. Klon is spoken by approximately 5,000-6,000 people in the western part of Alor island, Abui by approximately 16,000 people in central Alor, and Teiwa by approximately 5,000 people in the eastern part of Pantar island. On the islands of Alor and Pantar there is a very high level of bilingualism in the local variety of Malay; local languages are generally afforded low status in their speech communities and are regarded as ‘backward’ by residents in town. In addition, in many parts of the region, including the speech communities in this study, children are learning the local variety of Malay as their first language and are unable to communicate in the local languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/664559d3-203b-40df-931e-3d32158fb512

  • SOLOMON ISLANDS PIJIN, TO'ABAITA, LAU NICK THIEBERGER, JULIA COLLEEN MILLER

    DIGITISATION OF NORTH MALAITA RECORDINGS
    From 1971 to 1985, Ian Frazer conducted fieldwork in North Malaita, Solomon Islands, mainly To'abaita but with neighbouring groups as well (Lau, Baelelea, Pijin). During that time he built up a large collection of tapes, photos, field notes and other material. There are over 200 cassettes and over 40 reels of mixed content - music (traditional and contemporary), traditional stories, history, life histories, traditional and present day customs/culture, political history, labour history, and much else. None of the collection is digitised. This project will digitise this collection and make it available for current efforts to strengthen the ongoing use of local languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bd8722ed-d593-4b48-b3f1-f25ece0e4417

    Digitisation of North Malaita recordings
  • MAKU'A AONE VAN ENGELENHOVEN

    DOCUMENTATION OF MAKU’A
    Maku’a or Makuva is a language of East Timor with very few speakers. It is spoken in the Lautem district, around the village of Tutuala. All speakers are bilingual in Fataluku, which is the language they use for daily conversation. This collection was started with the intention of: collecting and editing all existing material on Maku’a; assessing the quantity and quality of remaining speakers in and around Tutuala (East Timor); and assessing the feasibility of Maku’a in a larger endangered languages documentation project under preparation in East Timor, the Tasi-Feto Project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c9e16ee9-91b0-4ca9-a167-0708b7c68f03

  • MARORI, SMäRKY KANUM I WAYAN ARKA

    THE ENDANGERED PAPUAN LANGUAGES OF MERAUKE-INDONESIA: ETHNOBIOLOGICAL AND LINGUISTIC DOCUMENTATION
    The project will focus on ethnobiological documentation of two endangered Papuan languages of the Wasur National Park, Merauke-Indonesia: Marori and Smärky Kanum. The speakers of these languages are bi/multilingual; the Marori people have almost completely switched to the most dominant language, Indonesian. These people have traditionally maintained close spiritual-cultural links to their natural environments, which have undergone unprecedented changes in modern Indonesia, affecting their biodiversity, and the peoples' languages. Outcomes of the proposed project include lexical databases/dictionaries, corpora, an Ethnobiology Guidebook of the Wasur National Park, and academic papers on language documentation and language ecology from linguistic, biological and anthropological perspectives.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/25cac4dc-b7b9-4765-bfb2-937b519c563f

    The Endangered Papuan Languages of Merauke-Indonesia: ethnobiological and linguistic documentation
  • ABOM, BITUR PHILLIP ROGERS

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF BITUR AND PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF THE MORIBUND ABOM LANGUAGE
    Bitur, one of the severely under-documented Tirio languages, is spoken by approximately 860 people in five villages of Western Province, Papua New Guinea. Abom is a moribund Trans-New Guinea language of the same region spoken by 15 or fewer people. Primary outcomes of this project include audiovisual corpora of transcribed, translated, and interlinearized texts; lexical databases compiled from elicitation and texts; and grammatical descriptions, all of which feed into research objectives including updated genetic classifications of both languages and contributions to linguistic theory. The Bituri people of Upiara village will also be trained and equipped to contribute to documentation efforts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/86fb67aa-a44c-4f7c-b8d8-723db240b821

    Documentation and description of Bitur and preliminary investigation of the moribund Abom language
  • GAVIãO, SURUI JULIEN MEYER

    DOCUMENTATION OF GAVIAO AND SURUI LANGUAGES IN WHISTLED AND INSTRUMENTAL SPEECH
    This collection provides a linguistic documentation and analysis of highly endangered traditional speech practices in two endangered Tupian languages of Brazilian Amazon: Gavião and Suruí. These practices consist of spoken speech emulated into whistles (for distance dialogues) or sung speech adapted into musical sounds (to perform a verbal art with musical instruments). The pioneer methodology underlying this collection includes the sound, video and text documentation of corpora in spoken, whistled, sung and instrumental forms as well as systematic gathering of sociolinguistic and ecologic data. This locally controlled work is made accessible to both scientific and indigenous communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1a172d4c-65ec-4658-8848-1288488bad2e

  • RONGGA I WAYAN ARKA

    DOCUMENTING RONGGA
    Rongga is a marginalized small language of south-central Flores island, Indonesia, with around 3000 speakers. A variety of data has been collected as part of the archive, including digitised audio and visual recordings, ethnographic notes based on interviews and observations, as well as anthropological or linguistic descriptions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/67717011-0520-4716-8c05-4626f3ff7bc1

    Documenting Rongga
  • PARESI-HALITI ANA PAULA BRANDAO

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF PARESI-HALITI (ARAWAK)
    This collection includes documentation of Paresi, an Arawak language spoken in Brazil. The Paresi people, who number approximately 3000 people (in 2017), live in the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The documentation took place between the years of 2011 and 2014 in six communities: Bacaval, Formoso, Nova Esperança, Kotitiko, cabeceira do Buriti and Buriti. The deposit contains 128 vídeos and 153 audios, and 8 hours of transcribed and translated texts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e361d981-6af1-4eb3-a626-236fd3cb65b1

  • CASHIBO-CACATAIBO DANIEL VALLE

    A DOCUMENTATION OF CASHIBO-CACATAIBO OF SAN ALEJANDRO WITH A FOCUS ON INFORMATION STRUCTURE
    This project produced a collection of transcribed and analyzed narratives and conversations from the San Alejandro dialect of Cashibo-Cacataibo (CBR), an endangered Panoan language spoken by 1500 people in Peru. The narratives and conversations are the source for a sketch grammar, a description of Information Structure and a vocabulary of the language which will be distributed to the community and Cashibo-Cacataibo organizations. The urgency of a documentation of this dialect is motivated by rapid socio-economic changes that threaten the vitality of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ffbff1ea-e1c7-408c-a770-8337f5564145

    A Documentation of Cashibo-Cacataibo of San Alejandro with a Focus on Information Structure
  • WAIMA/RORO COLLEEN HATTERSLEY, IKUPU PARU

    WAIMA/RORO DICTIONARY PHASE 2
    The Maeaka Tohana Language Project is digitising and updating original, first-contact records by early French missionary scholars of the Waima/Roro language of Central Province, Papua New Guinea. The main document was progressively created by at least five scholars from 1898 to 1939. The project has been active since 2013.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e51c51a2-26dd-46b4-b26d-ef6bafe675db

    Waima/Roro Dictionary Phase 2
  • BINE CHRISTIAN DöHLER

    A COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION OF BINE – A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN NEW GUINEA
    Bine is an underdescribed language of Southern New Guinea spoken by around 2000 speakers. It belongs to the Eastern Trans-Fly languages, itself largely undocumented.This project provides the first comprehensive documentation of Bine. Specific outcomes of the project are a multipurpose collection of audio-visual recordings, a corpus of 8 hours of transcribed and translated text, a dictionary of 1,500 entries, a grammar sketch of the language, and a series of subtitled short films. The data acquired will be useful to linguists working in comparative linguistics, language description, and typology. Materials will also be created for Bine speakers to preserve their language and teach it to others.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c86f341d-ff09-4f71-875d-0d467aac9e29

    A comprehensive documentation of Bine – a language of Southern New Guinea
  • BENA MICHELLE MORRISON

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF BENA
    This deposit consists of the first digital audio and video recordings of speakers of Bena, spoken in Iringa Region, Tanzania, resulting from fieldwork conducted between August 2008 and July 2009.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a5d030f5-77c3-45b0-a82c-879485ff8f15

  • BUNAQ ANTOINETTE SCHAPPER

    ZAPAL, AN ORAL LITERATURE GENRE OF THE BUNAQ LAMAKNEN
    This collection provides in-depth documentation of zapal, an endangered form of oral literature of the Bunaq of Lamaknen. The collection comprises over 100 zapal tellings. The zapal that are brought together here represent materials collected between 1966 and 2013 by the anthropologist Louis Berthe, the Bunaq leader A.A. Bere Tallo and most recently, myself, Antoinette Schapper. The archived zapal are in print and/or audio form, depending on when they were collected.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/da0035d3-b637-4cf4-8f7d-a795277029b5

    Zapal, an oral literature genre of the Bunaq Lamaknen
  • LONGGU DEBORAH HILL

    TELLING AND RE-TELLING: DOCUMENTING LONGGU, AN OCEANIC LANGUAGE OF THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
    This project documents folkloric stories and procedural texts of the Longgu (ISO 639-3: lgu) people (1,890 speakers), Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (-9.64, 169.78). These texts augment legacy data covering the same content and genre, providing a longitudinal study of an Oceanic language. The texts preserve cultural knowledge related to the five Longgu clans, and relate to the cultural practice of learning about kinship through giving and receiving food. The texts will be used to develop materials, including a thematic dictionary on weaving, for use in schools as the Solomon Islands moves to the use of local languages in education (from 2012).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f7f158fc-382f-4f37-b9a2-abcb4d707e0a

    Telling and Re-telling: documenting Longgu, an Oceanic language of the Solomon Islands
  • PANARá BERNAT BARDAGIL MAS

    A DIGITAL DOCUMENTATION OF PANARá
    Panará is a Jê language spoken in the Brazilian Amazon area by an estimated 500 speakers. The aim of this project is to produce a rich set of materials documenting the language, consisting of high-quality transcriptions of recordings and videos of spontaneous, traditional and ritual speech and traditional cultural practices. The outcome of the project will be a rich corpus of carefully transcribed and annotated Panará language recordings, a digital dictionary made in collaboration with members of the community, a set of videos depicting Panará cultural activities, and a set of high-quality monolingual texts that the community can use to further develop teaching materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3ec10965-6306-4e53-af10-bcaa90de47c0

    A digital documentation of Panará
  • OROHA DARREN FLAVELLE

    A GRAMMAR OF OROHA
    Oroha is primarily spoken in four villages on the southern tip of Maramasike. This collection contains a variety of different types of speech events in Oroha and explanations of – or at least queries into – those events in translation. It investigates the structures found in Oroha’s phonology, morphology, and syntax and how those are used in the discourse of the language for the purpose of creating a grammar of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3eb1dd90-85d8-43f6-a980-e23ca3f7188f

  • ECUADORIAN SIONA MARTINE BRUIL

    DOCUMENTATION OF ECUADORIAN SIONA
    Ecuadorian Siona [snn] is a highly endangered language with less than 200 speakers left. It is spoken in six communities in the Cuyabeno reserve and on the banks of the Aguarico, the Eno and the Aguas Negras in Eastern Ecuador (latitude=0º0659’N, longitude=76º3989’W). Even within the under-documented Western-Tucanoan branch of the Tucanoan family, there is little existing documentation on Siona. The corpus contains various genres, ranging from life stories traditional stories to conversations and it has a special focus on the documentation of the expression of evidentiality in the language. This deposit is the result of the HRELP project Documenting and Describing Ecuadorian Siona.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f357f7b2-8146-483d-a4e3-566fdd277b2d

    Documentation of Ecuadorian Siona
  • TERIK BENSON ODUOR OJWANG

    DOCUMENTING NARRATIONS OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCES OF THE PROCESS OF INITIATION INTO MANHOOD IN TERIK LANGUAGE OF KENYA
    This project will document audio and video episodes of narrations based on the process of male initiation among the Terik of Kenya. Terik is a Kalenjin (Nilotic) language spoken by some 20,000 people. Initiation entails one month of seclusion and mentorship whereby boys are taught diverse aspects of Terik way of life and cultural identity. However, this process is threatened by modern alternative rights of passage through hospital and church oriented options. Linguistic and cultural assimilation by the Nandi, Luhya and Luo neighbours has precipitated systematic loss of Terik culture and identity. Terik youth may not experience the folk wisdom transmitted intergenerationally during initiation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a3f229d6-64da-4354-bb74-fc0718f34721

    Documenting narrations of personal experiences of the process of initiation into manhood in Terik language of Kenya
  • DâW PATTIE EPPS, LUCIANA STORTO

    DOCUMENTATION OF DâW, A NADUHUP LANGUAGE OF BRAZIL
    This project will undertake the documentation of Dâw, a Nadahup language of the northwest Amazon. Dâw is spoken in a single community of about 100 people, near São Gabriel da Cachoeira, Brazil. The work will train Dâw speakers in documentation, and will lay the groundwork for a rich, annotated documentary corpus in audio and video, spanning a range of discourse types and genres. Further goals are a preliminary dictionary of the language and a deeper understanding of aspects of the grammar (building on Martins 2004). The team involves Brazilian and American linguists, anthropologists, and members of the Dâw community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e45aaf62-764e-4ffa-a382-a8a5aec1726a

    Documentation of Dâw, a Naduhup language of Brazil
  • DESANO WILSON DE LIMA SILVA

    DESANO – AUDIO AND VIDEO MATERIALS
    Desano is an endangered Eastern Tukanoan spoken in the Northwest Amazonian region of Brazil and Colombia. The deposit contains approximately 10 hours of audio and video materials of narrative, conversation and interviews, and elicitation of words, phrases and sentences, including speech across numerous genres (narratives, including oral history, traditional tales, dialogue, conversation, recipes and direction-giving, jokes, etc.), and representing different dialects of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6b282a8a-eda4-43c1-982a-232ff971dfe8

    Desano – audio and video materials
  • WA’IKHANA (PIRATAPUYO) KRISTINE STENZEL

    WA’IKHANA LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL ARCHIVE
    Wa’ikhana (Piratapuyo) is an Eastern Tukanoan language spoken in Brazil and Colombia. This collection of thirty-eight audio and video recordings of Wa’ikhana oral literature and cultural practices. The collection includes examples of diverse genres: ‘origin’ stories, traditional stories, personal narratives, interviews, and informational public addresses. Content includes traditional ‘Curupira’ (evil beings) stories; descriptions of daily life and activities of the Wa’ikhana people; explanations of the celestial calendar, traditional fishing methods, types of manioc, animals, birds and fish; and the mythological origins and history of the Wa’ikhana people.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/083c994c-f85c-4d83-961f-2d0049b68051

    Wa’ikhana Linguistic and Cultural Archive
  • KUBEO THIAGO CHACON

    THE WORK OF THE KUBEO LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION TEAM
    This is a collection describing the Kubeo language of Colombia, consisting of about 35 recordings from a diverse set of discourse genres, sociolinguistic contexts, different examples of language use with various participants, made by the “Kubeo Language Documentation Team”– a group of young people who were trained in Language Documentation. It also includes documentation of the activities carried out for the “Kubeo-Multilingual Encyclopedi-Dictionary Project” as well as a documentary film about the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/97933a30-2918-4676-8e7e-b6c429ba1a73

    The work of the Kubeo Language Documentation Team
  • RATAHAN ANTHONY JUKES

    DOCUMENTATION OF RATAHAN, AN ENDANGERED AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF NORTH SULAWESI
    Toratán, or Ratahan, is spoken by the older generation in a handful of villages located in southern Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. It is an isolated member of the Sangiric language family, surrounded by Minahasan languages. Like other languages of the region it is giving way to Manado Malay and the national language Bahasa Indonesia. Its decline is more advanced than most regional languages, with no more than a few hundred fluent speakers, all of advanced age. This deposit consists of audio and video recordings of Toratán speakers, resulting from fieldwork conducted between June 2005 and September 2007.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0e60a8c7-e26c-4e05-ab55-e6f474515eb4

    Documentation of Ratahan, an endangered Austronesian language of North Sulawesi
  • TONSAWANG TIMOTHY BRICKELL

    TONSAWANG: A COLLABORATIVE MULTIMEDIA PROJECT DOCUMENTING AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF NORTH SULAWESI
    The project will document Tonsawang, a severely endangered and undocumented language of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The once isolated Tonsawang speech community has been shifting to Manado Malay since the 20th century, and much more rapidly so since the early 2000s. This project will collect, collate, annotate, and archive high quality audio/video of culturally relevant linguistic data from a wide range of communicative events. Prioritising close collaboration and training with Tonswang speech community members, the resulting data will be open access archived to allow for further use for documentary, descriptive, and maintenance purposes.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0ff13252-45c9-41ee-a158-a9ffaad48f37

    Tonsawang: a collaborative multimedia project documenting an endangered language of North Sulawesi
  • KOTIRIA (WANANO) KRISTINE STENZEL

    KOTIRIA LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL ARCHIVE
    Kotiria (Wanano) is an Eastern Tukanoan language spoken in Brazil and Colombia. This collection contains sixty-seven audio and video recordings of Kotiria oral literature and cultural practices and includes examples of diverse genres: ‘origin’ stories, traditional stories, personal narratives, comical stories, interviews, conversation and informational public addresses. Content includes traditional ‘Curupira’ (evil beings) and ‘Turtle’ stories; descriptions of daily life and activities of the Kotiria people; explanations of the celestial calendar, production of woven artifacts, types of flutes, foods, wildlife and plants, and traditions related to dance ceremonies; documentaries on the building of a longhouse and traditional fishing methods; and the mythological origins and history of the Kotiria people.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7a7bbfc0-604e-4d76-b3a3-14d13d679658

    Kotiria Linguistic and Cultural Archive
  • LUGANDA SAUDAH NAMYALO

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF BARK-CLOTH MAKING: AN ENDANGERED CULTURAL ACTIVITY AMONG THE BAGANDA
    The project documented the art, of bark-cloth making; an endangered cultural activity practiced by the Baganda from the Central region of Uganda. The project, on the one hand, recorded the socio–cultural features in terms of the ritual and taboos related to bark-cloth making. In addition it video recorded the art of bark-cloth making and also collected the specialized language in terms of idioms, proverbs, rhymes and the lexicon associated with bark-cloth making.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b5882f60-ea6b-4e3c-833a-2da619b0e6d7

    The Documentation of Bark-cloth making: An endangered cultural activity among the Baganda
  • CIFUNGWA SAMUEL AKINBO

    DOCUMENTATION OF CIFUNGWA FOLKTALES
    Cifungwa [ISO 639-3 Ula] is an endangered Benue-Congo, West Kainji language that is spoken in the Ringa communities of Rafi Local Government area, Niger state, Nigeria. Due to war, migration and the political hegemony of the Hausa people, the speakers are generally shifting to speaking Hausa. As a result of this, various aspects of their culture (e.g. religion, folktales and music) are being forgotten. Only about 20 of 1000 speakers of Cifungwa currently practice their culture/religion. The project aims to document Cifungwa folktales with help from these few local practitioners. The result of the field research will be pictures, annotated audio, audiovisual data, a dictionary, and texts which will be made available to the community. In addition, my PhD thesis will be based on some aspects of the data.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f344be2f-3684-47a7-a649-a73339cbf2fe

    Documentation of Cifungwa Folktales
  • CUVOK NDOKOBAI DADAK

    A USAGE-BASED GRAMMAR OF CUVOK WITH FOCUS ON DOCUMENTING THE ENDANGERED SOCIAL ROLE OF BLACKSMITHS OF THE TCHOUVOK COMMUNITY
    Cuvok is a Central Chadic language spoken in the Far North Region of Cameroon. Tchouvok traditional society pivots around blacksmiths, who play a number of other key social roles: doctor, metalworker, mortician, mind-reader, and midwife. With the introduction of Islam, Christianity and modernism, the knowledge possessed by the blacksmith is no longer transmitted to the younger generation. This documentation project is integrated into my PhD research, which aims at a usage-based grammatical description of Cuvok. Much of my corpus will be composed of video recordings. Ethnographic notes will complement my annotated texts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/60fae7d3-d11a-449e-a313-1ebbcff0f424

    A usage-based grammar of Cuvok with focus on documenting the endangered social role of blacksmiths of the Tchouvok community
  • BAGA MANDORI FRANK SEIDEL

    BAGA MANDORI ARCHIVE
    Language documentation of Baga Mandori with focus on a dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f45f5166-8ec6-4079-9132-4e7918a99e4b

  • MALEKU ROBERTO HERRERA MIRANDA

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF MALEKU (CHIBCHAN, COSTA RICA)
    A collection of over 80 hours of transcribed video recordings around daily lives of Maleku speakers, including traditional economic activities, such as farming and fishing, with special attention paid to the documentation of culturally-relevant sites, such as Toro Lhami (Caño Negro), as well as to the rich oral traditions of the Malekus.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ae2d105e-d5de-4c2c-a8cb-6402e3e70931

    Documentation and description of Maleku (Chibchan, Costa Rica)
  • NALU FRANK SEIDEL

    DOCUMENTATION OF NALU, TRISTãO ISLANDS, GUINEA (ATLANTIC, NIGER-CONGO)
    Nalu is an endangered Atlantic (Niger-Congo) language spoken on the littorals of Guinea and Guinea-Bissau. Nowadays, Nalu speakers are shifting towards Soso. Because of the language shift situation it is hard to gauge exactly how many people actually speak the language still. Numbers vary between 6000-25000. This collection of the Nalu language currently includes two dictionary collections, audio and audio-visual data from different textual genres, cultural activities, etc., five short documentaries, preliminary drafts for an orthography and a grammatical sketch.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9d5305c5-1091-4ee6-9243-552a456a0fd1

    Documentation of Nalu, Tristão islands, Guinea (Atlantic, Niger-Congo)
  • BARAYIN JOSEPH LOVESTRAND

    RECORDING AND ARCHIVING BARAYIN (JALKIYA) LANGUAGE DATA
    Barayin (or Baraïn) is a Chadic language spoken by about 6000 people in the Guera region of the Republic of Chad. In 2010 the Barayin community began working with linguists and literacy specialists to develop an orthography and a mother-tongue literacy program. This project is a collaboration with the language association to produce more audio and video recordings of the language with transcriptions and translations. The recordings and transcriptions have a three-fold application: to produce more material for the mother-tongue literacy program, to provide data for ongoing linguistic analysis, and to preserve unique cultural and linguistic traits against the danger of extinction.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6db48326-5b03-463c-9a21-7648cd41db8e

    Recording and archiving Barayin (Jalkiya) language data
  • DAMAKAWA STUART MCGILL

    DAMAKAWA WORDLIST
    This deposit consists of electronic wordlists collected, with considerable difficulty, from four ‘rememberers’ of Damakawa. All of the words should be considered suspect, and there seems to be a lot of contamination from the surrounding languages (especially Cicipu and Tsuva’di).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/badba17a-a9fa-45a3-bce0-504990630885

    Damakawa wordlist
  • SEENKU LAURA MCPHERSON

    DOCUMENTING SEENKU (MANDE, BURKINA FASO) LANGUAGE AND MUSIC, WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO TONE
    This deposit consists of audio and video recordings of Seenku, an endangered Northwestern Mande language spoken in Burkina Faso. The majority of the recordings are of the southern dialect, spoken in and around Bouendé (Gbene), though a few recordings of the northern dialect of Karangasso are also included. While a wide variety of oral genres are included, special attention is paid to the musical adaptation of Seenku, both through sung texts and instrumental surrogate languages, especially the balafon, a West African resonator xylophone.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9bf034d4-5ab7-4923-bcb2-eeea49d63380

    Documenting Seenku (Mande, Burkina Faso) language and music, with special attention to tone
  • BADAGA ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, CHRISTIANE PILOT-RAICHOOR

    RECORDINGS OF BADAGA: A DRAVIDIAN LANGUAGE OF TAMIL NADU
    Badaga is a Dravidian language spoken in the Nilgiri mountains of Tamil Nadu, in southern India. Although it was historically an offshoot of the larger Kannada language, its isolation in the mountains since the 16th century has allowed it to evolve separately – to the point that it now presents special features in phonology, morphology, syntax and phraseology. With a total of 93 minutes, this archive presents six stories, myths or legends of the Badagas, as well as a sung ballad – also an important part of the oral tradition. These legacy audio items were recorded in 1977 by the late Christiane Pilot-Raichoor (1951-2018), a French linguist working with French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), in Paris-based dept. LACITO. Her analog recordings were digitized in 2020 with the help of SOAS and CNRS, and deposited by A. François.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/28412a91-3a4c-4614-98e1-faac7ded52c0

  • ZERENKEL SAKINE RAMAT

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF ZERENKEL, AN AFRO-ASIATIC LANGUAGE OF CHAD BELONGING TO THE EAST CHADIC LANGUAGE FAMILY.
    Zerenkel is an undocumented and endangered language spoken by circa 3000 rural inhabitants of the Guera region of Chad. This project aims to document a range of communicative events associated with highly endangered practices such as marriage rites, which are being lost to the community, and produce a phonology and grammar sketch. Due to a number of factors, the Zerenkel language and culture is under threat. Fortunately, in 2005, members of the community formed an association to develop and promote their language. This project will be undertaken in close collaboration with the community and aims to develop multilingual language and socio-cultural resources for the community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bb2aba52-fc8d-425c-a709-2c61576870aa

    Documentation and description of Zerenkel, an Afro-Asiatic language of Chad belonging to the East Chadic language family.
  • UNCUNWEE (GHULFAN) ROBERT WILLIAMS

    UNCUNWEE (GHULFAN) LANGUAGE ARCHIVES
    This project documents Uncunwee, an endangered and underdescribed dialect of the Kordofan Nubian dialect cluster, primarily spoken in an area south of the town of Dilling in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan. The deposit includes lexical, grammatical, narrative, conversation, demonstration, song, dance and general information data in a variety of file formats. This collection represents members of the Ghulfan-speaking people, who call themselves Wunci and refer to their dialect as Wuncu. In this collection, the group is referred to a Uncu and the language as Uncunwee.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8a14792b-df7a-4209-94db-babab2a26987

    Uncunwee (Ghulfan) Language Archives
  • BETTA KURUMBA GAIL COELHO

    DOCUMENTATION OF BETTA KURUMBA
    Betta Kurumba is an endangered Dravidian language spoken in the Nilgiri-Wynaad region of southern India. The Betta Kurumbas number 2-6,000 people and their home range straddles the states of Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. This collection consists of stories and descriptive narratives in Betta Kurumba, along with associated transcripts and metadata. The deposit was collected using fieldwork carried out between July 1997 and June 2004.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/84828a5c-b933-40ce-8b51-4a722986f533

    Documentation of Betta Kurumba
  • KAKABE ALEXANDRA VYDRINA

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE KAKABE LANGUAGE
    Kakabe is spoken by an ethnic group in the central part of Futa-Jallon area, Guinea. Kakabe is a small language in the terms of the number of speakers, which as such is not propitious for its survival. Still, even more important is the subordinate, non-prestigious status of Kakabe in the context of strong dominance of Pular language and culture and the general bilingualism in Pular. This collection includes recordings of texts with the emphasis on reflecting the natural language usage and representing different genres: 1) narratives such as (i) fairy tales, (ii) stories from common life, (iii) descriptions of cultural usages, such as wedding rites, funerals, (iv) descriptions of important traditional activities such as hunting, fishing, harvesting, planting, (v) historical narratives; 2) Conversations; 3) Songs.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3015b4c3-1ffc-4cc5-8309-f05f9d4ce8b2

    Description and documentation of the Kakabe language
  • GLAVDA JONATHAN OWENS

    GLAVDA IN RURAL AND URBAN CONTEXTS
    This project documents Glavda, a small, largely unstudied Central Chadic language of considerable phonological, morphological and syntactic complexity spoken in Northeastern Nigeria. Beyond building a sound archive based on interviews, free conversations and verbal art among speakers in the rural homeland, this study will also concentrate on the language of Glavda speakers in Maiduguri, the largest urban center in the region, and the goal of considerable out-migration from the rural homeland. This documentation of second generation urban speakers is crucial for gauging the effect of emigration on the longer term maintenance of Glavda in an increasingly urban world.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bfacbf59-bb2b-4f2b-9361-0a4243627baf

  • MALABAR INDO-PORTUGUESE HUGO CARDOSO

    ORAL CORPUS OF MALABAR INDO-PORTUGUESE CREOLE
    The oral corpus deposited here includes interviews with the very last speakers of Malabar Indo-Portuguese, or Portuguese-lexified creole of Southwestern India. The data was collected from 2006 onwards, in Cannanore [Kannur], in Calicut [Kozhikode], and in the Vypeen region of Cochin [Kochi]. While there is some linguistic diversity between the materials collected in all three locations, the overwhelming similarities among them (which also reflect centuries of populational interchange between the various towns) and the small numbers of speakers in each location justify their joint deposit in this corpus. Nonetheless, the location of each recording session is rigorously indicated, so that geographical variation can be aprehended.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/08153dce-e214-479c-9671-abcaf4f4cad1

  • TABAQ BIRGIT HELLWIG, GERTRUD SCHNEIDER-BLUM

    DOCUMENTING TABAQ, A HILL NUBIAN LANGUAGE OF THE SUDAN, IN ITS SOCIOLINGUISTIC CONTEXT
    Tabaq (kko) is a Hill Nubian language spoken by 800 speakers in the Nuba Mountains (N 11°55’53” E 29°26’34”) of the Sudan. This entire region is characterized by an extreme linguistic diversity, and we know very little about the languages, their genetic affiliations and their contact histories. The collection therefore takes a comparative perspective: it documents Tabaq in the form of an annotated audio/visual corpus, and collects parallel information on surrounding non-related languages (Katla, Julud, Tima). This approach allows us to investigate the historical and sociolinguistic context, and to trace contact influence in these languages. The documentary data in this collection will contribute to a better understanding of Nuba Mountain languages, including their typological make-up and their genetic and areal relationships.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/eab29275-6e4f-4d3f-8b0d-2badfa322d55

  • RAMA COLETTE GRINEVALD

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF RAMA: A VERY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF NICARAGUA
    Rama, known locally as “the Tiger Language”, is a moribund language spoken on the island of Rama Cay in Nicaragua, between the town of Bluefields and the Costa Rican border. It belongs to the Chibchan language family. The Ramas are the smallest ethnic group in the region and have the lowest status in the multiethnic social hierarchy of the region. Many Ramas shifted to Rama Cay Creole as a result of the influence of Scandinavian and German missionaries who spoke English to them; very few Ramas speak Spanish, however that is now changing with the introduction of Spanish-speaking schools in the area. The name “Tiger Language” comes from the myth that the Ramas, and especially shamans, were able to speak with tigers in the jungle; however there were also stories that the Rama were actually half tiger half human. (Austin 2005). This collection aimed to contain a dictionary, a digitized collection of taped texts, videotaped samples of language use, and a DVD documentary for class use. The main output is a trilingual Rama – English – Spanish dictionary incorporating linguistic and cultural information as well as visual, audio and video illustrations, produced as a paper publication and as a database to be potentially expanded and used for the production of pedagogical material by interested parties.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f34c3bef-e9be-4159-b597-465bb2589710

  • TAGOI SUSAN ALAMIN MUBARAK

    A PRELIMINARY LINGUISTIC SURVEY OF THE TAGOI LANGUAGE, NUBA MOUNTAINS, SUDAN
    The Tagoi language is spoken by 13,000 people (SIL 1982) in the Nuba Mountains, Sudan. This study provides facts about the sociolinguistic situation and the degree of language endangerment, the phonology, and the noun and verb morphology of the Tagoi language. It will constitute the basis for a more comprehensive project and build local competence in language documentation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c6d797e5-20b1-4c91-82e8-4d59d133d611

    A preliminary linguistic survey of the Tagoi language, Nuba Mountains, Sudan
  • GREAT ANDAMANESE ANVITA ABBI

    VANISHING VOICES OF THE GREAT ANDAMANESE
    This deposit of audio and video recordings, texts, books, articles and images is the result of Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese (VOGA), a major language documentation project which was undertaken from 2005 to 2009 in the Andaman Islands. Great Andamanese is a highly endangered language spoken by 37 people on Strait Island, one of the Andaman Islands located in the Bay of Bengal.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/45a9bdcc-3483-42c0-88d1-95997882d7fa

    Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese
  • SOQOTRI MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN: SOQOTRI
    Soqotri is spoken in Yemen in the Soqotra Archipelago on three inhabited islands (Soqotra, Samha, Abd al Kuri) and one island, Darsa, which is uninhabited but where people fish in the surrounding waters seasonally. The bulk of population of Soqotri speakers (c. 60,000 – no accurate census known) live on the main island, Soqotra. There are some emigre speakers in the Gulf and Oman.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1754c787-c092-4b75-982d-924137c16ec6

  • BIH TAM NGUYEN

    DOCUMENTING BIH, AN AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF VIETNAM
    Bih is a Chamic language spoken in the Southern highlands of Vietnam, closely related to Ede (also called Rade, Rhade). Bih is spoken by only around 1000 speakers and is nearly undocumented. The proposed project results in a grammar of Bih that will establish whether Bih is a distinct language or a dialcet of Ede. This documentation research will also produce texts accompanied with audio and video files and a trilingual Bih-Vietnamese-English lexicon. These products will be of use to the community and those interested in language and culture preservation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8fa53b2c-d1ed-4575-b4b1-299233051aca

  • GúJJOLAAY EEGIMAA SERGE SAGNA

    DOCUMENTATION OF GúJJOLAAY EEGIMAA (BASSE-CASAMANCE – SOUTHERN SENEGAL)
    This documentation of Gújjolaay Eegimaa (an Atlantic language of Southern Senegal, also known as Banjal/Gubanjalay, Gúllaay, Gussilay/Gusiilaay) contains over 100 pictures, 91 audio files and 12 video files of linguistic and cultural material. The recordings include conversations, narratives, rituals, and monolingual interviews on various aspects of speakers’ life.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/04d37222-1b75-4b14-81b2-b1ebe1f7e08a

    Documentation of Gújjolaay Eegimaa (Basse-Casamance – Southern Senegal)
  • LANGUE DES SIGNES MALIENNE VICTORIA NYST

    A REFERENCE CORPUS OF THE MALIAN SIGN LANGUAGE/LANGUE DES SIGNES MALIENNE (LSM)
    This project is a documentation of the Langue des Signes Malienne/Malian Sign Language (LSM), collected in Bamako and Mopti between 2007 and 2009. This deposit consists of video clips annotated in ELAN at the gloss, translation or abstract level. The recordings contain spontaneous narratives and dialogues as well as semi-spontaneous discourse.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c7ce7509-964a-4666-a3de-5c6bc1b69b15

    A reference corpus of the Malian Sign Language/Langue des Signes Malienne (LSM)
  • BAïNOUNK GUBëëHER AMADOU BèYE

    THE LANGUAGE OF MATERIAL CULTURE IN BAïNOUNK GUBëëHER
    Gubeeher is one of the three principal Bainounk languages. This language group is spoken in the Casamance region of southern Senegal. Surviving in only one village with about 500 inhabitants, Gubeeher is threatened by rural exodus and concomitant shift to other languages. This deposit contains a total of 4 hours and 42 minutes of recorded footage. Of this there is 2 hours 9 minutes recorded in audio and 2 hours 33 minutes of video. 20 minutes of these recordings have been transcribed and translated from Gubeeher into French using ELAN.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5f23f52c-131c-404e-bc14-90aef0692f11

  • TAGALOG ANJA LATROUITE

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): TAGALOG
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7271352b-a85b-4d69-bb21-d46612414bec

  • KUJIRERAY RACHEL WATSON

    A DOCUMENTATION OF KUJIRERAY AND RESEARCH INTO ITS NOMINAL AND VERBAL DERIVATIONAL MORPHOLOGY
    Kujirerai is a Jola language spoken in the Casamance region of Senegal, spoken by only a few hundred people in the village of Brin and the surrounding area. Although the language is vital within this small community, speaker numbers are dwindling as people migrate to urban areas in search of work. This collection of recordings of members of the Kujirerai speech community contains fables and descriptions of various aspects of life in the village such as rice cultivation, fishing, and construction.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/93788966-6ca5-4bbb-a253-07f75210b6cb

  • WANCHO BANWANG LOSU

    WANCHO CULTURE DOCUMENTATION
    Culture and Linguistics Documentation of the Wancho languages, these are from upper, middle and lower Wancho varieties of Longding district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. This project aims to document endangered materials such as folksongs, folktales, stories at least 15 hours of audio (15 GB) approximate and 10 hours of video (160 GB) approximate. Naturally occurring events will be prioritized more than re-creative things. Documentation will be done on the basis of evidentiality with the prior consent of local people.

  • BAïNOUK FRIEDERIKE LUEPKE

    A FIRST APPRAISAL OF BAINOUK AND ITS MAIN CONTACT LANGUAGE MANDINKA
    The project consists of a sociolinguistic survey of the highly endangered Atlantic language Bainouk, and a first step towards its documentation, taking into account the main contact language Mandinka. With about 6,000 speakers in the Upper Casamance region of Senegal and in neighbouring Gambia, Bainouk is a highly endangered language. Speakers of Bainouk have been bilingual in Mandinka for such a long time that bilingualism is an integral part of their identity. Following economic and linguistic pressure on the Bainouk, they are giving up their established bilingualism and shift to Mandinka and regionally and nationally dominant languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9dd2ac5f-c4be-4311-9e92-4cc853352034

  • PROVIDENCE ISLAND SIGN LANGUAGE REHANA OMARDEEN

    REVISITING THE SHARED SIGN LANGUAGE OF PROVIDENCE ISLAND
    Providence Island Sign Language (PISL) is a sign language indigenous to the island of Providencia in the Colombian department of San Andres, Providencia and San Catalina. PISL is a shared sign language, used by among the island's deaf and hearing inhabitants. Initially described in the 1970s/80s, some 100 years after its first emergence (Woodward, 1987), PISL has since received little follow up research. This project provides a dataset of the shared sign language used on the island which is presently critically endangered by rapidly shifting cultural, linguistic and economic pressures in the archipelago.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0c74ed8f-4d32-4eb7-ab33-375f9605ec58

    Revisiting the shared sign language of Providence Island
  • ZAGHAWA ISABEL COMPES

    ZAGHAWA-WAGI: TOWARDS DOCUMENTING THE SUDANESE DIALECTAL VARIANT OF ZAGHAWA
    Zaghawa is said to be spoken by a total of 169.000 speakers in Sudan (North Darfur state) and Chad. This project focuses on the distinct Sudanese dialect Wagi. While this dialect is still spoken, it is rapidly giving way to Arabic due to a policy of Arabicization and large-scale displacements in the course of a civil war in Darfur. This pilot project explores the feasibility of a comprehensive documentation of Wagi: it aims to establish a field site and to collect preliminary sociolinguistic, lexical and natural data.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c035c52c-797a-4628-99f4-3a133e14e275

    Zaghawa-Wagi: Towards documenting the Sudanese dialectal variant of Zaghawa
  • BEDIK ADJARATOU OUMAR SALL

    DOCUMENTATION OF BEDIK
    Bedik are a small ethnic minority, comprised of about 3500 individuals living in villages located in the mountains of eastern Senegal. The group represented here are the Bedik individuals of the rural community Bandafassi. Along with the Bassaris, the Napens and the Konyagi, they comprise the Tenda group. Bedik is a language belonging to the Mande group of the Niger-Congo language family.This deposit contains the first description and documentation of Bedik, a highly endangered language. The Bedik community would like to preserve and document their language and culture, so a collection of annotated texts based on recordings of speech in various genres and cultural contexts, and a first dictionary of around 3000 entries have been created.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c2bf5b3a-04fa-4f48-bd24-ca8c8dd5e052

    Documentation of Bedik
  • BAYOT MBACKé DIAGNE

    DOCUMENTING THE BAYOT LANGUAGE (A WEST-AFRICAN LANGUAGE OF THE JOOLA GROUP)
    Bayot is a Niger-Congo, West-Atlantic, Bak language of the Joola sub-group. This language is spoken in a Senegalese South-West zone that covers the prefecture of Nyassia, and mainly comprises three dialects: Ehin, Kugere, and Njambalaan. Nevertheless, according to my informants, speech differs from one village to another. The collection includes audiovisual documentation of the language and its oral narratives. It also includes data that lead to the doctoral dissertation on a phonological, morphological and morpho-syntactical description of the Bayot language, a multilingual dictionary of 5000 items and a spelling book for adult literacy.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9c406dc7-8ab5-4ab9-9e88-9d9cff754e52

  • K’ICHEE’ TELMA CAN PIXABAJ

    DOCUMENTATION OF FORMAL AND CEREMONIAL DISCOURSES IN K’ICHEE’
    Formal and ceremonial discourses are being lost rapidly in K’ichee’. This collection documents formal and ceremonial discourses in natural contexts in three K’ichee’ (ISO639-3:quc) communities: Santa Catarina Ixtahuacán, Nahualá, and Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala. The collection includes audio and video recordings with transcriptions, translations and analyses, a lexical database, and a grammatical analysis.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/276da7ba-cbbc-4c12-b790-ef0006c76b0c

  • CANGIN MOHAMADOU HAMINE WANE

    DOCUMENTING CULTURAL EVENTS IN CANGIN, A NOON LANGUAGE OF SENEGAL
    Cangin is a dialect of Noon (Non, None, Serer, Serer-Noon), a Niger-Congo language spoken by an estimated 9,000 members of the Cangin community in the Thiès area of Senegal. Other Noon dialects include Padee and Saawii. The deposit contains 188 files including audio, video, images, text, Elan files and their metadata. The corpus is composed of two cultural aspects of the noon people: a) Divination called “pay ” or “payaa” in Noon. It is a ritual for the Noon people through which they pray God to intercede for them; b) “mbilim” is a festival of songs and dance. Access is open to the collections of Festival of songs and dance; for divination, access to the audio/video recordings and transcriptions/translations and images requires a researcher or community member role.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/35d836db-edf5-4e44-a39b-a43f448908c1

    Documenting cultural events in Cangin, a Noon language of Senegal
  • BANGIME ABBIE HANTGAN

    BANGIME LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION
    This deposit provides a description of aspects of the phonology, morphology, and morphosyntax of Bangime. Bangime is a language isolate spoken in the Dogon language speaking area of Central Eastern Mali. Although the Bangande, the speakers of Bangime, self-identify with the Dogon, their language bears practically no resemblance to the surrounding Dogon languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fac83fae-0635-444e-a307-3efdc80731de

    Bangime language documentation and description
  • TOL (JICAQUE) STEFFEN HAURHOLM-LARSEN

    SURVEY, DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF TOL (JICAQUE) OF HONDURAS
    Tol is an indeginous language spoken by approximately 600 people in remote areas of the department of Francisco Morazán and Yoro in Central Honduras. Its exact genetic affiliation is still in doubt, that is, it has not been established which other languages to which it is related. This deposit consists of videos and audio recordings documenting various genres: interviews, personal accounts/stories, everyday situations, basket making, and children at play.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e648c6e2-c4f7-48b5-8d19-24518dc3091d

    Survey, Description and Documentation of Tol (Jicaque) of Honduras
  • USPANTEKO, SAKAPULTEKO NORA ENGLAND

    DOCUMENTATION OF TWO MAYAN LANGUAGES OF GUATEMALA: USPANTEKO, SAKAPULTEKO
    Uspanteko and Sakapulteko are two of the most severely threatened Mayan languages of the K’ichee’ branch. Deposit contents of Uspanteko: a 713 page grammar, a lexical database in Toolbox of 6117 entries, 119 digital audio files, 67 transcribed texts, 64 texts broken down into clauses, 32 glossed texts in Toolbox, and 5 videos. Deposit contents of Sakapulteko: a 778 page grammar, a lexical database in Toolbox of 8106 entries, 106 digital audio files, 91 transcribed texts, 89 texts broken down into clauses, 50 glossed texts in Toolbox, and 3 videos.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f6c3eff6-a086-4a6f-974a-37742646b7de

    Documentation of Two Mayan Languages of Guatemala: Uspanteko, Sakapulteko
  • MOCHO' JAIME PéREZ GONZáLEZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF MOCHO’ (MAYAN): LANGUAGE PRESERVATION THROUGH COMMUNITY AWARENESS AND ENGAGEMENT
    Mocho' is a Mayan language with two different dialects spoken in Chiapas, Mexico by around 50 speakers of whom fewer than half are fluent. It is therefore severely endangered and needs further documentation, especially of the Tuzantec dialect. Documenting Mocho' will be accomplished in cooperation with the community and will include descriptions of everyday life, as well as verbal art, cultural traditions, botanical knowledge and songs to the extent available. The results will be 75 hours of video and audio recordings. From this corpus, 15 hours will be transcribed and translated in ELAN and annotated in FLEX.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/aabc9f00-66d3-4d97-8aa7-e72ec3a10d86

    Documentation of Mocho’ (Mayan): Language Preservation through Community Awareness and Engagement
  • ZABIDI ARABIC, SANAANI ARABIC ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, SAMIA NAïM

    RECORDINGS OF SANAANI AND ZABIDI ARABIC: TWO ARABIC VARIETIES FROM YEMEN
    Yemen is one of the dialectally richest regions of the Arabic-speaking world. This collection records two Yemeni varieties Sanaani Arabic and Zabidi Arabic. For both dialects, Naïm’s Yemeni corpus includes: oral literature (tales, riddles, songs); cooking recipes; conversations about daily activities; questionnaires about Arabic dialectology; lexical surveys.
     
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    Recordings of Sanaani and Zabidi Arabic: two Arabic varieties from Yemen
  • IXIL MAYA MARIA LUZ GARCIA

    MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTATION OF IXIL MAYA RITUAL SPEECH
    Ixil is a Mayan language spoken by around 70,000 people in Guatemala. There are three main varieties of Ixil: Chajul, Nebaj, and San Juan Cotzal. Some linguists consider them to be three distinct languages, while others consider them dialects of a single Ixil language. Chajul and Nebaj Ixil use VSO word order while Ixil de San Juan Cotzal uses VOS. This project joins with community initiatives to document public performances of Ixil Maya traditional ritual discourse. These forms have been scarcely documented and include poetic forms, lexical items and grammatical structures not found in other types of Ixil speech. Practitioners of ritual discourse currently use this highly conventionalized form in innovative ways to document recent Ixil history as part of a concerted effort to disseminate and preserve this information for their own community and for outsiders. Nonetheless, those trained in these highly specialized forms are very few and diminishing in number creating a sense of urgency among speakers for documentation of these discourse practices.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/80684596-e727-40b6-a294-713f99b6eeb4

    Multimedia Documentation of Ixil Maya Ritual Speech
  • PESH CLAUDINE CHAMOREAU

    A CROSS-VARIETAL DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF PESH, A CHIBCHAN LANGUAGE OF HONDURAS
    This project will document and describe three varieties of Pech, the most northern Chibchan language spoken in Honduras, with around 300 speakers. Pech is a highly endangered language, as young people do not speak it. The outcome will be a digital corpus of 30 hours of audio and video recordings, transcribed and translated into Spanish, of which 15 hours will be provided with an interlinear gloss. Various genres will be documented, in particular endangered speech practices including prayers and ceremonial speech, and narratives related to traditional cooking and medicine. Two volumes will be produced: a descriptive grammar and a collection of transcribed traditional texts accompanied by audio, video and photography.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5e04e334-1619-48f4-9db9-0e6929148cd2

    A cross-varietal documentation and description of Pesh, a Chibchan language of Honduras
  • NORTHERN ALTA ALEXANDRO GARCIA-LAGUIA

    DOCUMENTATION OF NORTHERN ALTA, A PHILIPPINE NEGRITO LANGUAGE
    Northern Alta (aqn) is a highly endangered Negrito language of the Philippines. It is not generally transmitted to children and only a small amount of material has been collected. The aim of this project is to create a Language Documentation Corpus (LCD) for Northern Alta, comprising annotated high quality audio (.wav) and video recordings (.mp4), a sketch grammar, and a lexical database. The LCD will constitute the main resource for my PhD dissertation and focus on describing some grammatical features of the language. All of the outputs will be shared with the communities and will contribute to Negrito research.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ae83443f-7832-44f4-a263-3da1c1899ceb

    Documentation of Northern Alta, a Philippine Negrito language
  • Q'ANJOB'AL ELADIO MATEO-TOLEDO

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE SYNTAX AND SPECIALIZED USES OF Q'ANJOB'AL (MAYA)
    Q’anjob’al is a Mayan language mainly spoken in Guatemala, with a number of speakers in Mexico and other parts of the world. Language revival efforts are under way to encourage the use of Q’anjob’al teaching and promotional materials. This collection focuses on the syntax of complex predicates and endangered specialized uses of Q’anjob’al. The syntactic description focuses on complex predicates such as adverbial clauses, secondary predicates, auxiliary verbs, complement clauses, and directionals. The texts collected include topics such as ceremonial speech (i.e. corn planting, Mayan religion, house building, marriages, etc.) traditional medicine, customary laws, etc. and aspects of verbal art such as story telling, prayer, etc.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a7f985d4-90fb-477e-bffa-aec23274db8f

  • MIAHUATEC ZAPOTEC ROSEMARY G. BEAM DE AZCONA, EMILIANO CRUZ SANTIAGO

    DOCUMENTATION OF MIAHUATEC ZAPOTEC (Dí’ZDéH) OF SAN BARTOLOMé LOXICHA / DOCUMENTACIóN DEL ZAPOTECO MIAHUATECO (Dí’ZDéH) DE SAN BARTOLOMé LOXICHA
    The deposit contains materials documenting the San Bartolome Loxicha variety of the Miahuatec Zapotec language spoken in Oaxaca, Mexico. This deposit includes descriptions of the cornfield blessing ceremony practiced by the xa’yint, the 260-day Zapotec ritual calendar, traditional folklore, ethnobotany, onomatopoeia and phonology. In many cases these are raw materials which have been processed for published work elsewhere and thus this ELAR deposit is an important resource for readers and users of those materials. For example, a forthcoming book by Emiliano Cruz Santiago, Moód kéh’ mén noó tixu’t mén dí’z déh noó na’r kwent – Para leer y escribir el zapoteco de San Bartolomé Loxicha con cuentos, is a collection of glossed and translated texts collected from different elders. A reader of this collection could be interested to hear the original audio material. This ELAR deposit includes the original, unedited audio and/or video and early, rough transcriptions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6abc4aae-dd52-42b0-885c-7ac115244da6

    Documentation of Miahuatec Zapotec (dí’zdéh) of San Bartolomé Loxicha / Documentación del zapoteco miahuateco (dí’zdéh) de San Bartolomé Loxicha
  • TEOTEPEC CHATINO JUSTIN MCINTOSH

    TEOTEPEC CHATINO LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION THROUGH HISTORY AND CULTURE: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH
    Teotepec Eastern Chatino is a highly endangered Otomanguean language of Oaxaca, Mexico. A strong emphasis of this project has been placed on speaker training and community participation at historical and cultural documentation. Teotepec Chatino speakers have been trained to document the language historically and culturally with the aim of producing uniquely community-focused documentation to reflect Teotepec Chatino’s rich but quickly disappearing body of narratives and procedural text. The resulting collection consists of an integrated corpus of transcribed and analyzed texts which augments previous work on Teotepec Chatino and is valuable to both native speakers and scholars.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/02d4e856-7600-41c7-bce4-77495ef3d030

    Teotepec Chatino Language Documentation through History and Culture: An Integrated Approach
  • ZACATEPEC CHATINO STéPHANIE VILLARD

    DOCUMENTATION OF ZACATEPEC CHATINO LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    Zacatepec Chatino is a highly conservative language belonging to the Zapotecan language family, spoken by an estimated 1,000 people in Oaxaca, Mexico. This collection consists of transcribed and analyzed texts in Zacatepec Chatino, including documentation of naturally occurring narrative, dialogue, ritual speech and cultural knowledge. The texts will be the basis of a descriptive grammar and a trilingual dictionary which will be shared with the community in printed booklets, CDs, and through archival means. Native speakers will be trained in language documentation methods.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7cb179a1-2f27-4315-887a-084d46137652

    Documentation of Zacatepec Chatino language and culture
  • CHATINO ANTHONY WOODBURY, EMILIANA CRUZ, ERIC W. CAMPBELL, JUSTIN MCINTOSH

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHATINO
    Chatino is a group of closely related language varieties belonging to the Zapotecan branch of the Otomanguean language family. It is spoken by most of the 29,000 Chatinos of Oaxaca, Mexico. This is a collection of audio and video recordings of narratives, interviews, conversations, oratory, ritual speech, linguistic elications, and other genres in all major varieties of Chatino.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8bfd3fbd-bf94-4e86-8d00-4bb7a4c8287f

    Documentation of Chatino
  • ARTA YUKINORI KIMOTO

    A DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE ARTA LANGUAGE
    This is a 12-month project, for the purpose of documenting Arta, an underdescribed language in the Philippines. Arta is a severely endangered Austronesian language, spoken by 11 Negrito people living in Nagtipinan, Quirino Province. This documentation project will create a digital corpus of audio and video recordings, transcribed and translated into Ilokano and English. This project will also include the grammatical description of the language, submitted as my Ph.D. dissertation, writing a paper on sociolinguistics of the language, and create a textbook for educational purposes.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d621550b-3be7-4bb2-9ce5-32ceca23609a

  • CHATINO, SAN JUAN QUIAHIJE CHATINO SIGN LANGUAGE LYNN HOU, KATE MESH

    DOCUMENTING CHATINO SIGN LANGUAGE
    This deposit contains a record of communication in San Juan Quiahije Chatino Sign Language (or ‘making hands’ as it is described by hearing Chatino people), a constellation of family sign languages used in an indigenous Mesoamerican (Chatino) community in the San Juan Quiahije municipality in Oaxaca, Mexico. The data were collected by Lynn Hou and Kate Mesh in July and August 2012, during an initial field trip to San Juan Quiahije. Additional data were collected by Lynn for a follow-up trip in November and December 2012. Later research projects focused on the structure and uses of SJQCSL in the signing families and on the structure and uses of gestural practices among hearing community members, typically possessing minimal knowledge of SJQCSL. These projects are represented in two separate deposits: 0459: Gesture, Speech and Sign in Chatino Communities 0575: Documenting sign language structure and language socialization in the San Juan Quiahije Chatino signing community The image at the top shows Sendo, a deaf community member, signing SJQCSL.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cf110665-3694-4e74-a8f8-79e105d89b50

    Documenting Chatino Sign Language
  • SAN JUAN QUIAHIJE CHATINO SIGN LANGUAGE LYNN HOU

    DOCUMENTING SIGN LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION IN THE SAN JUAN QUIAHIJE CHATINO SIGNING COMMUNITY
    This deposit contains records of an ethnographic study of some of the linguistic, cognitive, and social elements of a constellation of family sign languages used in an indigenous Mesoamerican (Chatino) community in the San Juan Quiahije municipality in Oaxaca, Mexico. The researcher, Lynn Hou, conducted this project from June 2014 to June 2015, significantly expanding an early project archived in a separate ELAR deposit: 0355, ‘Documenting Chatino Sign Language’.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/718d2dd5-ec29-40f4-8f5e-d1aa490a22be

    Documenting Sign Language Structure and Language Socialization in the San Juan Quiahije Chatino Signing Community
  • ZENZONTEPEC CHATINO ERIC CAMPBELL

    DOCUMENTATION OF ZENZONTEPEC CHATINO LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    This project produced transcribed and analyzed texts from Zenzontepec Chatino (CZN), the most divergent Chatino language (Otomanguean), spoken in the southern Sierra Madre of Oaxaca, Mexico. There are about 8,000 speakers, but communities are shifting to Spanish. The corpus documents naturally occurring narrative, dialogue, ritual speech, traditional medicine, ethnobiological information, and geographic knowledge. The texts are the basis of a descriptive grammar, augment a tri-lingual dictionary in progress, and are to be shared with the community in printed booklets, CDs, and through archival. Native speakers will be trained in documentation methods and transcription.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/303f1a8a-447a-4ab7-93a2-fbddb3a14fab

    Documentation of Zenzontepec Chatino Language and Culture
  • SAN JUAN QUIAHIJE CHATINO SIGN LANGUAGE, CHATINO KATHRYN MESH

    GESTURE, SPEECH AND SIGN IN CHATINO COMMUNITIES
    This deposit contains a record of communication in gestured, and signed communication in the San Juan Quiahije municipality of Oaxaca, Mexico. It focuses on communicative practices for wayfinding and direction-giving in the mountainous topography of the municipality, as well as practices for maintaining a household, including many cooking activities. Two languages are featured: San Juan Quiahije Chatino (Zapotecan, Otomanguean) and San Juan Quaihije Chatino Sign Language (a sign language isolate emerging in the municipality). The data were collected by Kate Mesh and community members pseudonymized as CF32, CF23, CM13 and SF21. In a related project, Kate worked with Lynn Hou to document the structure of San Juan Quaihije Chatino Sign Language; their joint work is found in ELAR deposit 0355: Documenting Chatino Sign Language. The images at the top show a community member pointing to identify a nearby location (leftmost image, lowered arm) and a distant location (rightmost image, raised arm).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2a22b9c7-36be-4e5c-8cf7-b1ab5fe3d6f3

    Gesture, Speech and Sign in Chatino Communities
  • BAY ISLANDS SIGN LANGUAGE BEN BRAITHWAITE

    DOCUMENTING LANGUAGE ACROSS MODALITIES: VISUAL AND TACTILE SIGN LANGUAGE IN THE BAY ISLANDS
    A previously undescribed indigenous sign language is used in the Bay Islands of Honduras. The language emerged in the village of French Harbour, Roatán, and has spread to the neighbouring island of Guanaja. As a result of a high incidence of Usher Syndrome, deafness is relatively common in French Harbour, and is associated with loss of vision later in life. The language is used by hearing, Deaf, and DeafBlind people in both visual-gestural and tactile-gestural modalities. This project provides an initial documentation of this language in both modalities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d60a6a23-ff46-4c67-b315-4e28edd58725

    Documenting language across modalities: visual and tactile sign language in the Bay Islands
  • LAKANDON MAYA HENRIK BERGQVIST

    TEMPORAL REFERENCE IN LAKANDON MAYA
    Lakandon Maya is an endangered and under documented language belonging to the Yukatekan branch of the Mayan language family. The Lakandones, an indigenous group in south-eastern Chiapas, Mexico, have been the subject of many publications devoted to their religious traditions and their forest dwelling way of life, but surprisingly little work has been done describing their language. This deposit is an extensive documentation of the linguistic practices of Lakandon speakers with a focus on the use of deictic time words/expressions and their meanings, including materials from Henrik Bergqvist’s PhD dissertation project (these files are tagged “Temporal Reference in Lakandon”), as well as materials from the dictionary project run by Terry Kaufman, John Justeson and Roberto Zavala (these files are tagged “PDLMA”).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b9f8ce40-1e53-4c72-8afb-72304c132a4e

  • MEHRI SAEED AL-QUMAIRI, JANET WATSON

    COMMUNITY DOCUMENTATION OF BIOCULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE EASTERN YEMENI PROVINCE OF AL-MAHRAH
    Mehri is spoken in the south of the Arabian Peninsula, specifically in al-Mahrah, eastern Yemen, Dhofar in southern Oman and eastern parts of Saudi Arabia. This project focusses on the tight human-environment relationship in al-Mahrah through documenting and analysing nature-related texts in Mehri as spoken in Yemen. As al-Mahrah is the one safe enclave in a warring country, migration from non-Mehri speakers from other provinces in Yemen is increasing on a daily basis, exacerbating endangerment of both local language and ecosystems. The project engaged trained documenters from southern Oman to train local Yemeni community members including members of the Mehri Center for Studies and Research in documentation, ethical research and archiving. Dr Saeed al-Qumairi also attended a training workshop in Berlin on the documentation of endangered languages in the Middle East and North Africa. Trained community members produced 15 hours of audio/audio-visual recordings, of which c. 70% of the recordings are audio-visual recordings for gesture research. The group represented are all members of the Mehri tribe. The material within this collection includes that recorded from members of the following Mehri sub-tribes: Bit ‘Afrar, Bit Ali Muqaddam, Bit Yasir Ra’fit, Bit al-Qumairi, Bit Kalshat, Bit Zabnot, Bit al-Jaydah, Bit Za?banot, Bit Balhaf, Bit Bakrayt, Bit al-Mashikhi, Bit al-Hashimi, Bit Ziyad, Bit Sha’gul, Bit Malazi, Bit Yashul, Bit Sarfayt, Bit Barkah ibn Mhamid, Bit Thu’ar and Bit Maghfiq. This collection also exemplifies dialects spoken in different regions of al-Mahrah, including al-Ghaydhah, Hawf, Haswayn, Qishn, Shahn and Sayhut.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/78615d60-2a50-4822-ac0d-0d7cda432782

    Community documentation of biocultural diversity in the eastern Yemeni province of al-Mahrah
  • ISTHMUS ZAPOTEC JUAN JOSé BUENO HOLLE

    DOCUMENTATION OF ISTHMUS ZAPOTEC
    This deposit includes material on the linguistic documentation, description and analysis of naturally-occurring discourse in Isthmus Zapotec, a Zapotecan language spoken by approximately 80,000 people in southeastern Oaxaca, Mexico which is under threat given a rapid shift to Spanish. The main objective of the project was to, over the course of twelve months in Juchitán, document information structure in the language by recording, transcribing, annotating, and analyzing spoken texts from spontaneous life narratives as well as collect elicited native speaker judgments of constructed examples, something not represented currently in any archives of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1d575b8f-ba5d-4401-be25-8d6edef46cde

  • SOLEGA AUNG SI

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE LANGUAGE AND BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE OF THE SOLEGA
    This is a preliminary documentation of the Dravidian language Solega, and includes audio and video material, as well as colour photographs of the plants, animals and landscapes known to the Solega people. A variety of speech genres has been documented, including conversations, narrations, folksongs and ritual language. Many of the longer recordings deal with knowledge that is in danger of disappearing from the Solega collective memory – this includes recollections of how the forest once was before the invasion of the woody weed Lantana, knowledge of swidden farming and the semi-nomadic lifestyle that was practiced until the 1970s, the names of now-rare plants and animals, the songs and rituals that are now remembered by only a few, and the traditional medicines that have been driven to extinction by non-indigenous plants.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/27e62995-4dfd-4e7b-95f8-9aead97bfd42

    Documentation of the language and biological knowledge of the Solega
  • TSELTAL GILLES POLIAN

    ETHNOGRAPHIC AND DISCURSIVE AUDIOVISUAL CORPUS OF TSELTAL
    Tseltal, or Tzeltal, is a language spoken in Chiapas, Mexico and belongs to the Tseltalan branch of the Mayan family. This corpus consists of audio and video recordings of spoken Tseltal. It includes mainly conversations, narratives, interviews, prayers, and handicrafts performed with explanatory and technical discourse. Most recordings are from the Oxchuc dialect, but some others are from the Tenejapa dialect and one is from Guaquitepec.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4519d101-f29b-487c-953e-a21c7c9bd73f

    Ethnographic and discursive audiovisual corpus of Tseltal
  • YOLOXOCHITL JONATHAN AMITH

    YOLOXOCHITL, GUERRERO, MEXICO MIXTEC STORIES AND OTHER ORAL TRADITIONS
    This collection describes Yoloxóchitl Mixtec, a Mixtecan language which is spoken in four villages within a 12 km radius in coastal Guerrero, Mexico. This collection is currently divided into tow parts: narratives and their corresponding transcriptions, and elicitation lists for phonetic analysis.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b42c3b44-67c8-438d-8e79-60d9b2f2d85c

    Yoloxochitl, Guerrero, Mexico Mixtec stories and other oral traditions
  • ZENAGA ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, CATHERINE TAINE-CHEIKH

    RECORDINGS OF ZENAGA: A BERBER LANGUAGE FROM MAURITANIA
    Zenaga is a Berber variety spoken in southwestern Mauritania (Trarza region, close to the mouth of the Senegal River). Together with the Tetserret of Niger, it constitutes the southwestern group of the Berber language family, which in turn belongs to the Afro-Asian phylum. This corpus, collected by Catherine Taine-Cheikh in the late 1990s, includes lexical and morphological elicitation material, traditional tales, conversations and interviews.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1d4c6dd9-dfcc-4ca3-a641-278af9bded86

    Recordings of Zenaga: A Berber language from Mauritania
  • HOBYOT MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN: HOBYOT
    Hobyot is a Modern South Arabian language spoken in a small area either side of the Yemeni-Omani border. The number of speakers is estimated at under 1,000. Naturalistic and narrative data from two dialect groups of Hobyot, provisionally named ‘western’ and ‘eastern’ Hobyot, has been collected. Cultural topics covered included the personal (birth, death, clothing, personal hygiene etc.), animal husbandry, rain-fed cultivation, material culture, stories, poetry, songs, games, environment and trade. Audio data saved in WAV format. The complete collection will include audio transcriptions and translations in ELAN. This material can be compared to that of ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Shehret’; ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Harsusi’; ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Mehri’; and ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Bathari’.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6711db6a-16e8-4f48-be19-3bf9b59a7a0c

  • GARIFUNA DANIEL KAUFMAN

    ARUMAHANI AND ABAIMAHANI: GARIFUNA TRADITIONAL SONG ACROSS TWO DIASPORAS
    Garifuna, an Arawak language with a large French lexical component spoken by descendants of an African population, is the last indigenous language of the Caribbean islands to maintain a sizable population of first language speakers. We focus here on in-depth documentation of two of the most traditional genres of Garifuna a cappella song: Abaimahani, (a women's genre), and arumahani, (a critically endangered men's genre). We document these at two points representing two historical diasporas, Dangriga, Belize and New York City to explore resilience and adaptation of endangered languages in urban centers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/15c78f76-28d2-4847-99ac-e46dd0eacb24

  • SHEHRET JANET WATSON, MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN: SHEHRET
    This is an audio-visual documentation of the Shehret language spoken in Dhofar, Oman, and includes data from three dialect groups of Shehret: western Shehret, central Shehret and eastern Shehret. Naturalistic, narrative, songs and poetry data collected. Cultural topics covered: personal (wedding, birth, death, clothes), trade, stories, songs, poetry, games, occupation, material culture, environment, animal husbandry. Audio data are saved in WAV format. The complete collection will include photographs, audio and audio-visual data, transcriptions and translations in ELAN, and a comparative cultural glossary. This material can be compared to that of The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Mehri; The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Harsusi; The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Hobyot; and The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Bathari. This project was funded initially by the Diwan of the Royal Court, Oman between 1980 and 1990, and by a Leverhulme Trust project grant (RPG-2012-599) between January 2013 and December 2016.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/04d404f9-85ad-4398-a901-29e8113f3bff

    The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Shehret
  • HARSUSI DOMENYK EADES, MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN: HARSUSI
    Harsusi is a Modern South Arabian language spoken by between 600 and 1,000 members of the Harasis and ‘Afar tribes in Jiddat al-Harasis, Oman. This collection contains naturalistic and narrative data on various cultural topics, including: personal (wedding, birth, death, clothes), trade, stories, games, occupation, material culture, environment, animal husbandry.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c2e3b68e-146f-4573-8370-79e11530aac5

    The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Harsusi
  • AYUTLA MIXE RODRIGO ROMERO MENDEZ

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF AYUTLA MIXE
    Ayutla Mixe - also known as Ayuuhk - is a language spoken in the San Pedro y San Pablo Ayutla county of Oaxaca, Mexico, and belongs to the Mixean branch of the Mize-Zoque family. Ayutla Mixe has not been previously described nor documented. This deposit comprises over 150 audio and video files, as well as transcriptions of texts. These files include folk tales, local histories, and elicitation recordings focusing on temporal and spatial relations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/301312fd-7915-418c-8525-4221d36af800

    Description and Documentation of Ayutla Mixe
  • CHUXNABAN MIXE CARMEN JANY

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHUXNABáN MIXE
    Chuxnabán Mixe is a previously undocumented Mixean language spoken by 900 people in one village in Oaxaca, Mexico. This deposit consists of audio recordings with transcriptions and photos of speakers, resulting from fieldwork conducted between July 2008 and March 2009.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/13ed3c3c-6af9-487e-bde7-f841cf976f72

    Documentation of Chuxnabán Mixe
  • NUSAVI XIQUIPILTZIN EDUARDO SANTIAGO-JIMENEZ

    AUDIO RECORDINGS OF NUSAVI
    This deposit contains three voice recordings of Amelia Jimenez speaking the Nusavi language, spoken in Chalcatongo de Hidalgo, Oaxaca, Mexico. Amelia Jimenez is a native speaker of Chalcatongo Nusavi, and mother of the depositor of this collection, Xiquipiltzin Eduardo Santiago-Jimenez.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6f607e13-6171-45e3-9ac0-c9f9636acf23

    Audio Recordings of Nusavi
  • JITOTOLTEC ROBERTO ZAVALA MALDONADO, ISIDRO GONZáLEZ ROJAS

    DOCUMENTATION OF FIVE ZOQUEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MEXICO: JITOTOLTEC
    Jitotolteco is a vital language. The repository includes various audio and video files that reflect the spontaneous use of the language of various narrative genres, autobiographies, monologues and conversations of speakers from the different communities where the language is spoken. Each package of recordings contains a file of audio, video, files and there are four hours that are glossed. The total duration of the recordings comprises 24 hours, the same ones that are transcribed in the Elan program and four hours are glossed through the FLEx program. These are available without restrictions. The file also includes a vocabulary and grammar outline.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7bea91c4-f194-441c-ae18-17ded4e6b3d3

    Documentation of five Zoquean languages spoken in Mexico: Jitotoltec
  • SAN MIGUEL CHIMALAPA ROBERTO ZAVALA MALDONADO, SILVIANO JIMéNEZ JIMéNEZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF FIVE ZOQUEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MEXICO: SAN MIGUEL CHIMALAPA
    San Miguel Chimalapa Zoque (henceforth ZMI) from the Mexican state of Oaxaca belongs to the Zoquean branch of the Mixe-Zoque family. There are three divisions in the Zoque branch: three Zoque languages from the Gulf, two Zoque languages from the Chimalapas in Oaxaca, and two Zoque languages from Chiapas. The two Zoque languages of the Chimalapas are: Zoque of Santa María and Zoque of San Miguel (Wichmann 1995). The municipality of San Miguel Chimalapa is located in the east of the state of Oaxaca, in the District of Juchitán. According to the 2010 census data from the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (abbreviated in Spanish as INEGI), the municipality of San Miguel Chimalapa has a total population of 6,608 inhabitants, of which 1,843 are ZMI speakers. ZMI is an endangered idiom because it is not passed on to new generations. This indigenous language is only vital among adults and the elderly, who also maintain other knowledge of the Zoque culture.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/31c004fd-8209-46f1-b6be-63a41004c32e

    Documentation of five Zoquean languages spoken in Mexico: San Miguel Chimalapa
  • SANTA MARIA CHIMALAPA ROBERTO ZAVALA MALDONADO, IRASEMA CRUZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF FIVE ZOQUEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MEXICO: SANTA MARIA CHIMALAPA
    This project will document five languages of the Zoquean branch, members of the Mixe-Zoquean language family. All the languages are spoken in the South of Mexico. Chiapas Zoque and Jitotoltec are spoken in Chiapas, Highland Popoluca in Veracruz, whereas San Miguel Chimalapa and Santa Maria Chimalapa are spoken in Oaxaca. All the five languages are endangered. The project will annotate high-quality videos regarding different communicative events selected by a team of linguists who are members of the speech communities. The material will be transcribed, translated, and analyzed in ELAN/FLEX. Most of the documentation and diffusion of the results will be carried out by members of the different speech communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/15a0488f-fa80-47d0-9b13-36eef2a3b74a

  • CHIAPAS ZOQUE ROBERTO ZAVALA MALDONADO, ERNESTO RAMíREZ MUñOZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF FIVE ZOQUEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MEXICO: CHIAPAS ZOQUE
    The variants of the Chiapas zoque that are documented in this collection belong to the dialect area of northeast Chiapas, which correspond to the following municipalities: Ocotepec, Tapalapa, Pantepec, Rayón, Tapilula, Chapultenango, Amatán (all of these in Chiapas); and Tapijulapa and Oxolotán (in Tabasco). There are approximately 23,000 speakers of these variants, more than 10,000 in Ocotepec and only one speaker in Tapijulapa. The language is barely spoken by remembers in Tapijulapa and Oxolotán, although there are still children who learn Zoque in Pantepec, Chapultenango, Tapalapa and Ocotepec. This collection contains expressions of speech that deal with the foundations of the peoples, legends, worldview, traditional medicine, cooking recipes, life stories, cultural practices of the ancestors, such as the way of eating, the sowing cycle, the raising domestic animals, and hunting animals.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/65ea5321-6d84-4be8-b6b5-07fd15814ea0

    Documentation of five Zoquean languages spoken in Mexico: Chiapas Zoque
  • Tù’UN NA ÑUU Sá MATXí (SAN MARTíN DURAZNOS MIXTEC) SANDRA AUDERSET, CARMEN HERNáNDEZ MARTíNEZ

    DOCUMENTING Tù’UN NA ÑUU Sá MATXí NTXè’è (SAN MARTíN DURAZNOS MIXTEC)
    This is a community-led research project that aims at creating a translated and annotated audio and video corpus of San Martín Duraznos Mixtec spoken in the community of origin in Oaxaca, Mexico. We will create educational materials with a focus on connecting the diaspora community in California with the community of origin through documentation of traditional stories and culinary and agricultural practices, which will contribute to the maintenance of the language. This variety of Mixtec is understudied and has approximately 300 speakers in the community of origin and 50 or more speakers in the diaspora community in Ventura County, California.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a3085a77-687a-48b9-9caf-a48c3c1f1f1f

    Documenting Tù’un Na Ñuu Sá Matxí Ntxè’è (San Martín Duraznos Mixtec)
  • PAKATAN ALBERT BADOSA ROLDóS

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE PAKATAN LANGUAGE SPOKEN IN HOANH SON, QUANG BINH PROVINCE, VIETNAM
    The Pakatan/Maleng/Bo language (henceforth Pakatan) has less than a thousand speakers. The variety spoken in the mountainous area of Hoanh Son, in the Vietnamese province of Quang Binh, is called Malieng is estimated to have around 200 speakers, who live in half a dozen villages around the area. Pakatan is spoken in both Vietnam, where receives the name Malieng, and Laos. This language must not be confused with Malieng, a Chut language variety. Pakatan is a Vietic language (Viet-Muong) with less than a thousand speakers. The community was originally formed by collectors and traders who have become emergent mountain agriculture sedentists.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c2e75c21-4831-4b84-9322-a6892ddffc3e

  • IXCATEC DENIS COSTAOUEC, MICHAEL SWANTON

    TEXTUAL AND LEXICAL DOCUMENTATION OF IXCATEC, A HIGHLY ENDANGERED OTOMANGUEAN LANGUAGE OF OAXACA, MEXICO
    Ixcatec is a highly endangered language belonging to the Popolocan branch of the Otomanguean language family. It is spoken only in Santa María Ixcatlán, situated in the state of Oaxaca, southeastern Mexico. This collection includes a variety of linguistic and cultural material that came from both a linguistic and an ethnobiological project. The aim of this documention was to produce, safeguard and disseminate as much high-quality linguistic and cultural documentation on lxcatec as possible.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d2162d96-2d7a-438f-b67b-7e2c33ce010c

  • BATHARI MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN LANGUAGES: BATHARI
    Data collected on naturalistic and narrative data. Cultural topics covered centred particularly on harvesting the sea, the principal livelihood of the Batahirah, but personal data (birth, death, clothing, personal hygiene etc.), and data on material culture, animal husbandry, stories, poetry, songs, games, environment and trade were also collected. Audio data saved in WAV format. The complete collection will include photographs, audio data and transcriptions and translations in ELAN. This material can be compared to that of ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Shehret’; ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Harsusi’; ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Hobyot’; and ‘The documentation and ethnolinguistic analysis of Modern South Arabian: Mehri’.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8e11823b-313b-49e0-8e89-7acf82102a56

  • MEHRI JANET WATSON, MIRANDA MORRIS

    THE DOCUMENTATION AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF MODERN SOUTH ARABIAN: MEHRI
    Mehri is a Modern South Arabian language currently spoken in Yemen, Oman and southern and south-eastern Saudi Arabia with communities in other Gulf states. Different names include Mahriyot for eastern Yemeni Mehri, and Mehreyyet for the Mehri spoken by tribes in and around Dhofar. This collection includes naturalistic and narrative data which cover cultural topics such as: personal (wedding, birth, death, clothes), trade, stories, songs, poetry, games, occupation, material culture, environment, animal husbandry.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e1220e3a-459f-4565-bb7c-5a748d01ef97

  • HIGHLAND POPOLUCA ROBERTO ZAVALA MALDONADO, WENDY LóPEZ MáRQUEZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF FIVE ZOQUEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN MEXICO: HIGHLAND POPOLUCA
    Popoluca speakers still maintain some cultural practices that help document and preserve the language. For example, the Tiger Dance is performed as a ritual to bless the land, to ask Jomxuk —God of maize— for a good production of maize. With this dance, the four cardinal points of the compass are also asked, using Highland Popoluca, that people do not experience catastrophes and epidemics, that the population be in peace and balance. Thus, the stories of the speakers reflect their cultural knowledge. The recordings come from the municipality of San Pedro Soteapan and from three communities near the municipality: San Fernando, Santa Martha, and Planta Uno.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/842815bf-b404-4e6c-830c-a4a9b291b13e

    Documentation of five Zoquean languages spoken in Mexico: Highland Popoluca
  • GUTOB JUDITH VOß

    DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMAR OF GUTOB (MUNDA)
    Gutob (ISO639-3:gbj) is an endangered Munda language (Austro-Asiatic) spoken in Koraput district of Odisha, India and neighbouring districts in Andhra Pradesh. Estimates regarding the number of speakers vary between 15,000 and only 5,000. The community is rapidly shifting to Desia Oriya (ISO639-3:dso), the local Indo-Aryan lingua franca. The main objective of the present project is the compilation of an annotated audio-video corpus. It will include speech acts from all domains in which Gutob is used. Additionally, the project will result in a grammar of Gutob, which will be submitted as PhD thesis.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f027a3a2-d38f-4428-88ec-33b46d346cb3

    Documentation and grammar of Gutob (Munda)
  • MATLATZINCA ENRIQUE L. PALANCAR

    DOCUMENTATION OF MATLATZINCA, AN OTO-MANGUEAN LANGUAGE OF MEXICO
    This project is documenting Matlatzinca, an endangered Oto-Manguean language of Mexico, spoken in the village of San Francisco Oxtotilpan in the State of Mexico. We have collected a great number of high-quality videos involving interviews carried out in Matlatzinca, which are mainly about life stories, anecdotes and cultural traditions. Much of the material has been transcribed and translated. We are currently focusing on annotation in ELAN. The project will also produce a book with texts on Matlatzinca folklore and history. Most of the documentation activities are carried out by members of the community based in San Francisco Oxtotilpan.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/98b5886c-166d-437f-8eb8-bc7f0c5b99f2

    Documentation of Matlatzinca, an Oto-Manguean language of Mexico
  • OTOMI NESTOR HERNANDEZ-GREEN

    DOCUMENTATION OF SAN JERóNIMO ACAZULCO OTOMI, OCOYOACAC, MEXICO
    Acazulco Otomi is spoken in San Jerónimo Acazulco, Ocoyoacac, Mexico, by about 350 people. It belongs to the Mexico State linguistic variant within the Otomi group of languages, which in turn belong to the Oto-Pamean branch of the Otomanguean family (Southern and Central Mexico). The deposit contains in total: 19.2 hours of recordings, of which 16.1 include video.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e4af5b03-70ce-4dd3-8473-64813a515d8d

    Documentation of San Jerónimo Acazulco Otomi, Ocoyoacac, Mexico
  • IBATAN MARIA KRISTINA GALLEGO

    CONSEQUENCES OF CONTACT: DOCUMENTING IBATAN WITHIN THE MULTILINGUAL LANDSCAPE OF BABUYAN CLARO
    Babuyan Claro, an island in the northern Philippines, is home to a dynamic multilingual community of people proficient in at least three languages - Ibatan, the local language, Ilokano, the regional lingua franca, and Filipino, the national language. This project documents Ibatan within this multilingual landscape, which continues to shape the language. Language choice and use for Ibatan's 2,500 first- and second-language speakers reflects participation in social networks that maintain connections across the island. A sociolinguistically-informed documentation that considers speakers' linguistic repertoires provides an understanding of the emergence, development and current use of Ibatan through processes of language continuity and change.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/23f69de9-c51d-454b-aa14-27422a03f41f

  • HAWAII SIGN LANGUAGE JAMES WOODWARD

    DOCUMENTATION OF HAWAII SIGN LANGUAGE: BUILDING THE FOUNDATION FOR DOCUMENTATION, CONSERVATION, AND REVITALIZATION OF ENDANGERED PACIFIC ISLAND SIGN LANGUAGES.
    Hawaii Sign Language (HSL) developed indigenously in Hawaii. After the introduction of American Sign Language in 1941, HSL has become a critically endangered language in urgent need of documentation. Fewer than 40 users have been identified, all elderly, many above 80. In the documentation process, teaching materials with companion dictionaries will be developed and conversational histories about the lives of HSL users will be collected, annotated and archived. This is the first in-depth study of any indigenous Pacific sign language, providing an important foundation for future research on other undocumented indigenous sign languages in the Pacific.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/027289e5-3d94-4ac0-bf21-92a8b16f013f

  • YUCATEC MAYA JUERGEN BOHNEMEYER

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): YUCATEC
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/46f6eef5-b39b-4b8e-8343-4aefe108a928

  • AKHA JAKE TERRELL

    DOCUMENTATION OF ARCHAIC AKHA, THE REGISTER OF THE SHAMAN
    This collection focuses on Archaic Akha, a code which is not mutually intelligible with modern Akha (ISO 639-3: akh). There are about 500,000 speakers of Akha in Burma, China, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. However, according to community reports, the archaic code is spoken by perhaps only 100 elderly shaman. This collection, based out of Chiang Rai, Thailand, consists of a corpus of Archaic Akha. It may be used by the community for educational materials, and also serve as the basis for a reference grammar of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a17c3a50-ad6d-4204-b6c1-9418a4dee6ff

    Documentation of Archaic Akha, the register of the shaman
  • SONE-TU CHIN MAI NI NI AUNG

    SONE-TU CHIN RITUAL LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    This project records and documents material in Ritual Sone-Tu, a ritual form of Sone-Tu, known only by three spirit mediums now in their 70s and 80s. Some-Tu is a Southern Chin (Tibeto-Burman) language spoken by about 28,000 people in Rakhine (Arakan) State, Myanmar. The arrival of Christian missionaries during colonial times caused widespread decline in ritual practices, meaning that Ritual Sone-Tu is now completely unintelligible to Sone-Tu speakers. Ritual Sone-Tu will disappear with the three surviving spirit mediums. The ritual language retains a rich Sumtu lexicon which in the spoken language has been replaced by Arkanaese and Burmese loans. The rituals and performances in which the language is used include life events such as births, deaths and marriages, and other community occasions such as festivals and harvests.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/805b27c1-b65a-4afb-a934-d87a89ba4a98

  • SIHAN PETER PUXON

    DOCUMENTATION OF SIHAN, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF BORNEO
    Sihan (Sian) is a severely endangered language spoken by a formerly nomadic community in one village along the Menamang river in Sarawak, Malaysia. The number of speakers of Sihan is less than 250. This project aims to document traditional narratives, healing songs, epic poems, hunting and foraging practices and a wide variety of naturally occurring speech. Community members will be trained in documentation and description techniques and a transcribed and translated audio-visual corpus will be produced. From this corpus a small Sihan-Malay-English thematic dictionary will be created for the purposes of language support.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a9720877-8d4f-4410-99a1-52a3871c34cd

    Documentation of Sihan, an endangered language of Borneo
  • TINIGUA KATHERINE BOLAñOS

    DOCUMENTATION OF TINIGUA
    Tinigua [ISO 639-3: tit] is the last surviving member of an independent South American Tiniguan family whose other members have disappeared without substantial documentation; with only one remaining speaker, it is now critically endangered. Additionally, the language is seriously underdocumented and underdescribed. This project aims to provide a linguistic documentation of Tinigua through work with Sixto Muñoz, its last remaining speaker. The expected outcomes of this project are a transcribed, translated and annotated audio-visual corpus of the language, a grammatical description, and a lexicon. Additionally, I aim to gather further historical and cultural data on the Tiniguan culture.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/eccbcbce-12e8-485e-959f-439efcc9bd57

  • MALACCAN PORTUGUESE CREOLE STEFANIE SHAMILA PILLAI

    MALACCA PORTUGUESE CREOLE: A PORTUGUESE-BASED CREOLE
    Malacca Portuguese Creole (MPC) is an endangered language spoken by people of Portuguese descent in Malaysia, with the largest concentration of speakers found in the city of Malacca (or Melaka) in the central part of Peninsular Malaysia. MPC can be traced back to the arrival of the Portuguese in Melaka in 1511. This collection includes video and audio recordings conducted at the Portuguese Settlement from 2011. The audio and video files are paired with time-aligned orthographic transcriptions in MPC and their English translations which were carried out by a native speaker consultant.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/782cee90-6092-427a-ae84-18d14cbfe9ff

    Malacca Portuguese Creole: A Portuguese-based Creole
  • LIMASSA BENEDIKT WINKHART

    A DOCUMENTATION OF THE REMNANT BAKA-GUNDI LANGUAGE LIMASSA
    Limassa is a language of the Baka-Gundi branch of the Mundu-Baka family and currently classified as Ubangi. The number of capable speakers is no higher than 45. Considering the much higher number of Bomassa living in the Congo, this estimate displays the degree of language transmission and consequently the alarming level of endangerment. The different types of data in this deposit include visual and acoustic data in the form of videos containing a wide variety of interactions between speakers in a plethora of natural contexts. All components of the corpus have been video and audio recorded. Only lexical and grammatical elicitation were recorded without video.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/70607394-af7c-4fe2-af53-fd40fd6cac50

    A documentation of the remnant Baka-Gundi language Limassa
  • NAM TRIK GENY GONZALES CASTANO

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NAM TRIK, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF THE COLOMBIAN ANDES
    Nam Trik (Barbacoan family) is a poorly described language of the Southwestern Colombian Andes spoken by about 8.000-9.000 people. The project will focus on two highly endangered dialects of Nam Trik, spoken in the communities of Totoró (76 speakers) and Ambaló (163 speakers). In collaboration with trained members of the community, a Nam Trik audio-video corpus will be collected. Part of this corpus will be used to produce a grammatical description and a bilingual multimedia dictionary. This study will also contribute to the typology of Barbacoan languages since Nam Trik does not have a grammar yet.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2ba7e9d6-1c52-498d-afd4-8ba81dc8d536

    Documentation and Description of Nam Trik, an endangered language of the Colombian Andes
  • SOO, NYANG’I SAMUEL JAMES BEER

    LEGACY DOCUMENTATION OF SOO AND NYANGI FROM JOHN M. WEATHERBY'S FIELD NOTES AND AUDIO RECORDINGS
    This collection consists of digitized audio recordings of Soo and Nyangi produced in northeastern Uganda between 1964 and 1972. It includes directly elicited wordlists, songs, traditional narratives, and conversations. The data was collected by John M. Weatherby, an art teacher, civil servant, and Ph.D. student and by Lokiru Cosma, a community member and research assistant to Weatherby. After Weatherby’s departure from Uganda subsequent to the rise of the Amin regime, the data was stored in Weatherby’s home in Javea, Spain. Weatherby’s main objective was to write an ethnohistorical account of Soo culture. He particularly emphasized oral history and religious practices.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/032185e4-d02f-47ef-9c41-dbfd8c12f0b6

    Legacy Documentation of Soo and Nyangi from John M. Weatherby's Field Notes and Audio Recordings
  • LEUKON (SIKULE) TASNIM LUBIS, NICK WILLIAMS

    PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION OF LEUKON LANGUAGE
    This project focuses on initial documentation of Leukon, an endangered language of Simeulue island, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Leukon is spoken in just two villages on Simeulue and is increasingly threatened due to rapid development and increased reliance on Indonesian and the local lingua franca, Jamee. There is almost no prior literature on Leukon, and very little on the neighboring (likely related) languages, Sigulai, Devayan, Haloban, and Nias. This project will produce audiovisual documentation of Leukon, focusing on traditional work as a culturally important of their indigenous knowledge.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c3c5deb9-2e7b-4e7b-b987-03db702028bc

    Preliminary Documentation of Leukon Language
  • YANOMAMA HELDER PERRI FERREIRA

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE YANOMAMA OF PAPIU, AN ENDAGERED YANOMAMI LANGUAGE OF BRAZIL
    The project aims to continue the documentation and support of the Yanomama of Papiu, Brazil. The main goals are: (1) to record, transcribe and translate 20 hours of audio and/or visual material of a variety of contexts of speech; 5 hours will be fully glossed (2) to create an online multimedia dictionary of the Yanomama (3) to publish textbooks of Yanomama folk literature and testimonial narratives; (4) to train local language consultants in documentation. Yanomama is a Yanomami language of the Yanomam group and has around 1350 speakers, 300 of which live in Papiu.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/21480863-d5be-4b13-8070-fb9f52c76396

  • MAH MERI, CEQ WONG NICOLE KRUSPE

    CEQ WONG AND MAH MERI: THE DOCUMENTATION OF TWO ASLIAN LANGUAGES OF THE MALAY PENINSULA
    1) The Ceq Wong collection contains audio recordings of traditional narratives and autobiographical stories with transcriptions and notes, video recordings, a draft trilingual dictionary, and photos. 2) The Mah Meri collection contains audio and video recordings of story-telling, rituals and daily life, photographs, a trilingual dictionary, and maps recording Mah Meri place names.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5128fd69-dd5b-4ecd-b5a1-7273eac52c0f

  • GYELI NADINE GRIMM

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): GYELI
    Gyeli is an endangered Bantu language, spoken by 4,000 - 5,000 “Pygmy” hunter-gatherers in Cameroon. This collection supplements the documentary collection on Gyeli in The Langauge Archive (https://dobes.mpi.nl/projects/bakola/) by providing experimental data on the form and function of causality expressions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e6e467a9-8dfe-4709-ae77-295711526819

    Causality Across Languages (CAL): Gyeli
  • NASA YUWE (PáEZ) ESTEBAN DIAZ MONTENEGRO

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NASA YUWE, THE VERNACULAR LANGUAGE OF THE NASA PEOPLE OF THE COLOMBIAN ANDES
    The Nasa Yuwe language (formerly Páez) is the vernacular language of the indigenous Nasa (aka Páez) people (ca. 150,000 ethnic members) in the Southwestern Andes of Colombia. Recent studies demonstrate the rapid decline of the intergenerational transmission and use of Nasa Yuwe in the youngest generations. The audio and video recordings to be collected in this project with the active participation of young community members will result in an important corpus of data susceptible to be used for the production of a description of the language and educational materials for the Nasa community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6cc746eb-6be2-40dc-8a4d-12476db32b92

  • NAHUATL JONATHAN AMITH

    DOCUMENTATION OF NAHUATL KNOWLEDGE OF NATURAL HISTORY, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND ECOLOGY
    This project focuses on three interrelated domains of endangered cultural knowledge and linguistic expression: 1) nomenclature, classification and use of plants in Nahuatl communities in the municipality of Cuetzalan, Puebla, Mexico; 2) the creation of objects of daily use from regional flora; 3) traditional ecological knowledge. It builds upon experiences and trust Amith has developed after three years of lexicographic work: two native speakers have advanced skills in digital recording, transcription, and ethnographic description; three partnering Indigenous collectives will facilitate work in scores of communities throughout the municipality and are building a cultural center to utilize project results in education and outreach.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/310403b7-98bd-40af-babd-45b03369c0fc

    Documentation of Nahuatl Knowledge of Natural History, Material Culture, and Ecology
  • ZIHUATEUTLA TOTONAC, ECATLáN TOTONAC, CERRO XINOLATéPETL TOTONAC, COAHUITLáN TOTONAC, UPPER NECAXA TOTONAC DAVID BECK

    TOTONAC ETHNOBOTANICAL KNOWLEDGE: DOCUMENTING TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE ACROSS COMMUNITIES
    This project documents threatened traditional ecological knowledge in five Totonac communities in northern Puebla State, Mexico. The research teams are headed by two experienced linguistic fieldworkers with long-term commitments to the communities. They will build a database of plant nomenclature, classification and use, backed up by voucher specimens and digital photographs. A team of native experts will discuss each plant in digital recordings; all texts will be transcribed and translated. Results will be integrated with Amith's NSF/NEH and ELDP-supported work in five Nahuat communities. Collaboration with expert taxonomists ensures accurate identification to species of all documented plants.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/87cccad7-3103-40f0-8212-cfe8d5241431

    Totonac ethnobotanical knowledge: Documenting traditional ecological knowledge across communities
  • OTOMI MARIA DE JESUS SELENE HERNANDEZ GOMEZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF SANTA ANA HUEYTLALPAN OTOMI, TULANCINGO, MEXICO
    This collection is a documentation of the Otomi language spoken in the community of Santa Ana Hueytlalpan, (Tulancingo, Hidalgo, Mexico). This is a language belonging to the Otomi linguistic family of languages (Otopamean branch of the Otomanguean macrophyllum). Santa Ana Hueytlalpan Otomi documentation is nearly nonexistent. This collection contains texts with audio and video files and a visual bilingual dictionary intended to be used by the community (1,500 speakers approximately).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1869591a-890b-4551-a333-a98aa360cb82

    Documentation of Santa Ana Hueytlalpan Otomi, Tulancingo, Mexico
  • DARMA CHRISTINA OKO

    DARMA DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION PROJECT
    Conceived and initiated in 2001, this project aims to create a lasting record of the Darma language spoken in the easternmost part of the Kumaun region of Uttarakhand, India. Darma has been identified as a ‘threatened’ language, and recent history has resulted in an increased rate of language shift. The Darma, along with the Byangkho (Byansi) and Bangba (Chaudangsi) comprise the Rung tribe. While speakers frequently refer to Rungboli/Runglo as a single language, each of the three Rung groups has its own language. The Government of India has classified the Rung as a Scheduled Tribe under the broad term Bhotia (‘of Tibet’), a term that refers to various groups who speak Tibeto-Burman languages in the Indian regions bordering Tibet. The Rung reject the term Bhotia; in fact some argue that the people are of Rajput origin. They do not object, however, to being called Shauka by the Kumauni people of Uttarakhand—a moniker meaning ‘moneybags’, which certainly reflects earlier times when the Rung traded with Tibet and had considerable wealth.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/90ce88c8-31b0-4d6c-99eb-79d97c7201cb

    Darma Documentation and Description Project
  • LAITU MUHAMMAD ZAKARIA

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE LAITU LANGUAGE WITH A FOCUS ON ENDANGERED CULTURAL PRACTICES
    This project will document and describe Laitu, a Southern Chin language spoken by around 15000 people in Minbya, Mrauk-U and Myebon Townships of Myanmar. There has been a large impact of Buddhism and Christianity on the traditional social system of the Laitu Chin, resulting in abandonment of names, traditional clothing, rituals, and religion. On top of this, there is scant linguistic study and no publicly archived material on this language so far. The project focuses on audio and video recordings of narratives concerning nearly extinct religious rituals, the traditional ritual of facial tattooing, and other genres of texts with cultural significance.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a4141d65-8fbb-46de-bbb5-8d39adf15f38

    Documentation and description of the Laitu language with a focus on endangered cultural practices
  • NIHALI SHAILENDRA MOHAN

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF NIHALI, A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE ISOLATE OF INDIA
    Nihali, also known as Nahali, is a critically endangered language isolate spoken in central India, with about 2,000 speakers in Jalgaon-Jamod Tehsil, in the Buldana District of Maharashtra, India. This collection includes 20 hours of archival audio-video recordings. It includes texts, narration, Nihali festival, Nihali people lifestyle. The data was collected by Dr. Shailendra Mohan.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d59615aa-a9e1-4b1b-a48a-4229187969bb

    Documentation and Description of Nihali, a critically endangered language isolate of India
  • PARSI GUJARATI ANTON ZYKOV

    VIDEOGRAPHY-BASED DOCUMENTATION OF THE LANGUAGE OF PARSIS IN GUJARAT AND MAHARASHTRA
    Parsi Gujarati is a minor vernacular language of a Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) ethnoreligious community in Gujarat and Maharashtra. It is primarily spoken by the elders and inextricably linked with the unique Parsi identity: its culture, religious ceremonies, arts, crafts, professions, oral expressions and folklore. The project aims at comprehensive videography-based documentation of PG through a text corpus with audio-visual recordings of naturally generated discourse occurring around extinguishing lifecycle rituals such as unique Parsi-Zoroastrian funerals exclusively performed by few hereditary corpse-bearers and context-dependent idioms, a PG distinguishing feature; and a dictionary with terms arising from rituals and traditional arts and crafts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/11917387-acd7-4572-8660-fb0328755e2b

    Videography-based documentation of the language of Parsis in Gujarat and Maharashtra
  • HUASTEC ANA KONDIC

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE SOUTH EASTERN HUASTEC
    This deposit documents South Eastern Huastec, a language in the Huatecan branch of the Mayan language family, as spoken by the Teenek (Huastecs) from the village of San Francisco in the La Huasteca region of Veracruz, Mexico. The deposit contains a large number of audio files, along with transcriptions and some video files. The audio files contain elicitation sessions, stories and conversations. There is also a dictionary, pictures of consultants who participated in the documentation project and materials for language teaching and community use.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/080ebd3d-23d3-44c5-ba5f-7d426dc8ced2

    Documentation and Description of the South Eastern Huastec
  • DANAU AUNG SI

    DOCUMENTATION OF DANAU, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF MYANMAR (BURMA)
    This collection represents a preliminary documentation of the endangered Austroasiatic language Danau, spoken in Myanmar (formerly Burma), with a focus on ethnobiological and cultural knowledge. Audio recordings representing a range of speech genres have been deposited here: these include lexical and grammatical elicitation, conversation, description and rituals. Recordings containing names of local, culturally important plants are accompanied by colour photographs of these plants. Around 90 minutes of audio (not including the wordlist recordings) have been transcribed and translated so far. The collection also includes a preliminary analysis of the phonetics, phonology and grammar of Danau, and the transcriptions presented here should be regarded as provisional and subject to revision.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/549255d6-0ca5-4037-8c96-17d800e7366d

    Documentation of Danau, an endangered language of Myanmar (Burma)
  • COSAO XIANMING XU

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE COSAO LANGUAGE FOCUSED ON TRADITIONAL BIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AROUND WILD MUSHROOMS IN YUNNAN, CHINA
    The Cosao, with a population of 149; the Labe, with 4,013 (2017), live in South and Centre Yunnan, China, approximately at longitude 101°34'E, latitude 21°37'N and longitude 101°54'E, latitude of 23°24'N. The Government lumped them into Hani and Bai respectively. However, their languages are not mutually intelligible and critically endangered. This project will focus on documenting the semantic domain of wild mushrooms, along with their traditional biological, ecological knowledge. Data will be collected by digital camera and recorder. Audio, visual materials will be transcribed, annotated, translated into Chinese and English, finally input ELAN, EDIUS or FLEx for archiving.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/58dc3e37-631c-413a-8fa2-acafde94a945

    Documentation of the Cosao Language Focused on Traditional Biological and Ecological Knowledge around Wild Mushrooms in Yunnan, China
  • YAMI MENG CHIEN YANG, DER-HWA VICTORIA RAU

    YAMI DOCUMENTATION
    The Yami language, spoken on Orchid Island, belongs to the Ivatan or Bashiic language group, a subgroup of the Austronesian family. The language is also referred to as Ciriciring no Tao, or “human speech”, by its speakers. This collection contains Yami texts recorded on video and/or audio tapes during the two-year documentation project between 1 August 2005 and 31 July 2007. The collection includes narratives, a reference grammar, a trilingual dictionary with 2000 entries, and multimedia pedagogical materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/03cf69af-7c00-49e3-a9c8-793eb490ca2d

    Yami Documentation
  • CORA WILLIAM H. PARKER

    DOCUMENTATION OF CORA IN SAN JUAN CORAPAN
    The primary product of this project will be an open access, digital corpus of 30 hours of video and audio of Cora language; including traditional genres of narrative, procedural discourse on topics of local plants and agricultural techniques, and natural conversation data.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0829a3a6-92c4-4346-8e37-04845cdd1f7f

    Documentation of Cora in San Juan Corapan
  • MACAU SIGN LANGUAGE FELIX YIM BINH SZE, MONICA XIAO WEI

    PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION OF MACAU SIGN LANGUAGE
    Macau is a small city at the Southern coast of China. Around 1200 Deaf/hard of hearing people live there, and over 200 are users of Macau Sign Language. However, due to the enforcement of inclusive education, Macau Sign Language has ceased to pass on to the deaf youngsters under the age of 20. The Deaf Community has a strong wish to document and conduct research on their sign language. This project aims at providing foundational documentation training to the Deaf Community and assisting them in the documentation groundwork, with a long term goal to preserve and promote the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/dc832503-4e10-49a3-b4a5-c5ab833f5cb1

  • KENZI-ANDáANDI, NOBíIN KIRSTY ROWAN

    NUBIAN LANGUAGES: AN ARCHIVE OF LANGUAGES AND CULTURAL MATERIAL FROM NUBIA
    The documentation is the primary repository for the toponymic nomenclature of Nile Nubian.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a3664178-e67f-47ad-8beb-7d3d635b00bc

    Nubian languages: an archive of languages and cultural material from Nubia
  • LAJI YAN YANG

    DOCUMENTATION OF CRITICALLY ENDANGERED LAJI LANGUAGE IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
    Laji people, who call themselves li¹³pu³³ljo³³, is an ethnic group living in two nearby villages in Jinchang Town, Maguan County, Yunnan Province of China. The number of this group is only 415, but only 22 people are proficient in Laji language. Among them, 8 are more than 70 years old, 11 are between 60-69 ages, and 3 are in 53-60 age group. The two villages are surrounded by Miao and Zhuang people, Laji language has not been taught in the families, thus young Laji people cannot speak Laji language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a830494a-07ca-4e2c-9b05-e209adc17107

  • SOUTHERN PINGHUA XIAOLAN CAO

    DOCUMENTATION OF WUCUN PINGHUA
    This project will fund a native-speaker researcher to thoroughly document Wucun Pinghua, an endangered variety of Southern Pinghua spoken by approximately 6,000 villagers in five villages in Nanning, Guangxi, China. Currently, most fluent speakers of Wucun Pinghua are from the grandparent generation, and young villagers are not learning the language due to language shift to Mandarin. This project will result in fifteen hours of rich audio- and video- recordings with high-quality phonological transcriptions in IPA, morphological annotations, and English translations. The outcome of this project will contribute significantly to typological, historical, and areal linguistics of East and Southeast Asia.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5aa2cf83-b44d-4923-a539-1d1f04a3f01d

  • SAAROA CHIA-JUNG PAN

    A DOCUMENTATION OF SAAROA, A MORIBUND AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE OF TAIWAN
    Saaroa language is a moribund Austronesian language of Taiwan. Spoken by approximately 10 people in Taoyuan District, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, Saaroa, an underdescribed language, is not actively spoken in the community anymore and may be the next extinct Formosan language (the other two possible candidates are Thao and Kanakanavu). This project will pay attention to documentation of a variety of texts, including colloquial speech, traditional stories, ritual speech and practices.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c5720e97-2e85-42ed-b924-5668ee063f34

  • ASUR TRAINEES OF JHARKHAND SUMMER SCHOOL

    ASUR RECORDINGS FROM THE JHARKHAND SUMMER SCHOOL
    This deposit contains spontaneous interviews, conversations, songs and basic dictionaries on various semantic fields in Asur, a small, highly endangered North Munda (Austro-Asiatic) language spoken in northwest Jharkhand and eastern Chhattisgarh in eastern central India. The data for this deposit was all collected during the “International Workshop on the Documentation of Endangered Languages and Cultures – With Special Reference to Jharkhand” at the Dr Shyama Prasad Mukherjee University, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India from April 14-23, 2019.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fea50259-2c15-48f7-92bc-b16e8958fec8

    Asur recordings from the Jharkhand Summer School
  • SHE JUNJUN FAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF LUOFU AND LIANHUA, TWO DIALECTS OF THE ENDANGERED SHE-LANGUAGE IN SOUTHERN CHINA.
    She language(shx) is a minority language, spoken in a few villages within Luofu Mountains (23°13'N,114°02'E) and Lianhua Mountains (23°03'N,115°10'E) in South China. It has about 1500 speakers(2010). Many teenagers switch to a Chinese dialect Hakka, with disfluent SHE, having forgotten most of the words and expressions of Traditional Environment Knowledge(TEK), which are now recalled only by some old men. The project makes a comprehensive documentation of SHE's two dialects, include phonological system, morpheme-syllables, a large set of words and expressions, syntactic sampling sentences, everyday sentences, and large varieties of discourses, especially focusing upon the vocabulary and discourse in the context of TEK. All the digital data can be applied to language teaching, linguistic research and other potential uses.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7bf756a0-49b5-4983-a269-b9a344646f42

  • MALTO CHAITHRA PUTTASWAMY

    DOCUMENTATION OF MALTO
    Malto is a North Dravidian language spoken in the Rajmahal hills of Eastern India, having around 108,000 speakers in India and another 20,000 in Bangladesh. This deposit consists of over 90 audio and video recordings of speakers of Malto, resulting from fieldwork conducted between August 2005 and May 2006. The recordings include conversations, elicitations, staged events, songs and stories.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cce950ef-fe12-4c28-8e1a-65dc273050bd

    Documentation of Malto
  • ANAL PAVEL OZEROV

    A COMMUNITY-DRIVEN DOCUMENTATION OF NATURAL DISCOURSE IN ANAL, AN ENDANGERED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE
    Anal is an endangered Tibeto-Burman language (ca. 20,000 speakers) in Manipur, Northeast India. The available data presents a remarkable morphological complexity, typologically unusual properties and archaic features, valuable for historical analysis. Like many other endangered languages of this linguistically diverse, under-documented region, Anal experiences a great pressure from the official state language Manipuri.This project will build upon the recently initiated project of community-driven documentation of traditional oral literature. Relying on the work of community members, it will create an annotated multi-media corpus of everyday Anal conversation. It will additionally document grammatical data, which presents a number of typological peculiarities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/af2415d6-dc75-4330-ba5d-7b8122e50982

    A community-driven documentation of natural discourse in Anal, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language
  • SADU XIANMING XU, BIBO BAI

    LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL DOCUMENTATION OF SADU
    Sadu group, with a population of 1,505 (2009), live in three villages of Yuxi Municipality,Yunnan Province, China. The Government lumped them into the Bai nationality in 1958. However, their language is not intelligible to Bai, nor to the neighbouring Yi nationality. The project will focus on documentation and salvage of this endangered language. It will target recording texts, legends, stories, folk songs, proverbs, marriage and funeral ceremonies comprehensively involved in their real life. Data will be collected by using audio recording combined with video footage. A sociolinguistic survey will also be carried out.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/14985dd0-3908-485e-9507-0f796f767831

    Linguistic and cultural documentation of Sadu
  • MONSANG LINDA KONNERTH

    A GRAMMAR OF MONSANG, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF MANIPUR, INDIA
    This deposit is a collection of audio recordings and audio-video recordings of a variety of text genres. The project behind the deposit has the goal of preparing a reference grammar of Monsang that is built on a corpus of natural data. The collection is supposed to both document aspects of the traditional life of the Monsang community, in particular folk stories, as well as document modern life, also in terms of how life for community members has been changing rapidly in the last several decades.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e65d4e48-53db-4d2a-a90d-cdf55456bbd5

  • PELA SOPHIE MU

    DOCUMENTATION OF PELA AND LANGUAGE CONTACT BETWEEN PELA AND ZAIWA IN LEXICAL AND SYNTACTIC BORROWINGS
    This project works with local communities to document and describe the definitely endangered Pela language and its contact with Zaiwa. Pela, also known as Bola or Bolo, is a language spoken amongst the Pela community in southwest China. Audio, video and photographic records pay special attention to endangered genres such as religious ritual and folk stories. This data will be used to describe the influence of Zaiwa on Pela lexicon and syntax.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0d8b64e3-e264-4789-ae28-4f32d3281d7e

  • MARING SUSIE KANSHOUWA

    A DOCUMENTATION OF MARING LANGUAGE(S)
    Maring is an endangered language spoken in the southeastern part of Manipur, India. The language has three varieties spoken across different geographical location, and are affected by numerous extra-linguistic factors such as education, jobs, inter-marriages, migration, assimilation to another culture and language and insensitive government policies, etc. The current study attempts to understand the cause and effect of language change and endangerment arising out of language contact with neighboring languages. This deposit is a collection of elicited sentence lists of the varieties. It comprises 7 hours of audio recordings with annotation.

    A Documentation of Maring language(s)
  • WUTUNHUA YESHES VODGSAL ACUO

    PRIMARY DATA OF WUTUNHUA
    Wutunhua is spoken by approximately two thousand people in Tongren County, in the eastern part of Qinghai province, western China. Wutunhua is a mixed language with the majority of lexical items coming from Chinese and the remainder from Tibetan and some limited borrowings from Monguor. This deposit contains video and audio recordings by various speakers of different ages, including a corpus of audio recordings with annotations in Chinese, and a lexicon with Chinese, Tibetan and English glosses.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a1a345f2-a0d8-4a06-9918-343ec202799a

    Primary data of Wutunhua
  • DAOHUA YESHES VODGSAL ACUO

    PRIMARY DATA OF DAOHUA
    This collection comprises mainly of primary data, including audio and video recordings of Daohua and photos. There are also annotated lexical entries, a text collection, dictionary and research report of Daohua, and a Scheme of the Script System of Daohua (SSSDH).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b6c83d31-12b2-4a2c-85ed-ea375c09fa65

    Primary data of Daohua
  • MEITHEI, MEIBI KAREN PARKER

    AMAILON: THE RITUAL LANGUAGE OF THE NUPA MAIBI
    This project involves documentation of an endangered variety of Meithei, a Tibeto-Burman language of North East India. The language is a liturgical speech variety used by the Meibi (a religious title), who represent a minority among the Nupi Manbi (indigenous transgender) community in Manipur state, North East India. The Meibi are part of a specific offshoot of an ancient Manipuri religious tradition called Samahadi, which predates the colonial era. The language of the Meibi is unintelligible to the speaker of standard Meithei.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6d0e180f-a0d4-4720-878d-4e80bcb567a2

    Amailon: the ritual language of the Nupa Maibi
  • TUJIA SHIXUAN XU

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE SOUTHERN TUJIA LANGUAGE OF CHINA
    Southern Tujia (ISO-639: tjs) is a tonal Tibeto-Burman language spoken in a small number of villages in the mountainous Wuling Range of the western Hunan and Hubei provinces of central south China. There are around 6 million Tujia people, however only a small number of these speak the Southern Tujia variant. The Northern variant (ISO-639: tji) is more widely spoken. This collection contains data on language structure, phonological, lexical, and grammatical features. There are also audio recordings of natural speech and folk literature
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/63d9ed9a-b008-46ef-bd76-5a16be2e3e67

    Documentation of the Southern Tujia Language of China
  • BAJJIKA JAY HUWIELER

    BAJJIKA: SWADESH LIST ELICITATION SESSIONS
    This deposit contains Swadesh list words and their glosses in Bajjika and explanations in English, with each word separated into an individual file. Individual files typically contain a target gloss (which is given in the file name) as well as thematically-related glosses the speaker thought of while giving the target gloss. There are also two folders of vowels specifically recorded for acoustic analysis. The Metadata table describes the individual files and the related-glosses the files also contain.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ba6b8d3c-c8fc-47db-926f-322e4e4387d6

  • SUMI AMOS TEO

    DOCUMENTING TRADITIONAL AGRICULTURAL SONGS AND STORIES OF THE SUMI NAGAS
    Sumi (ISO: nsm) is a Tibeto-Burman language spoken in Nagaland, Northeast India by an estimated 100,000 speakers. Its use is in a state of decline as a result of competing national and dominant languages. This deposit is largely a video documentation of the practices of the Sumi people and the agricultural cycle, including songs, dances, tools and techniques developed for sustainable agriculture.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d8c39123-5283-4cfe-b8b5-13d4be8de453

    Documenting traditional agricultural songs and stories of the Sumi Nagas
  • KARBI LINDA KONNERTH

    KARBI TEXTS
    Karbi is the third-largest tribal language of the state of Assam in Northeast India. While most Karbi speakers live in the Karbi Anglong and West Karbi Anglong districts of Assam, a considerable number of Karbi villages are also found in other districts of Assam, as well as in the states of Meghalaya and Arunachal Pradesh. According to the Karbi Lammet Amei (Karbi Literary Association), there are an estimated half a million native speakers of Karbi all in all. In the Karbi Anglong and West Karbi Anglong districts, a variety of Karbi is generally spoken that can be referred to as ‘Hills Karbi’. The texts in this collection are almost entirely in Hills Karbi.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/62ed5d8f-93aa-4ea0-be82-3dec514e3c97

  • ALIPUR VILLAGE SIGN LANGUAGE SIBAJI PANDA

    INVESTIGATION OF AN ENDANGERED VILLAGE SIGN LANGUAGE IN INDIA
    This collection records Alipur Village Sign Language (AVSL), used in a village in Karnataka. Alipur village has a total population of about 14,000 people and is an enclave of Shia Muslims in an otherwise Hindi-dominated Kannada-speaking area. The village has a longstanding tradition of endogamous marriage patterns, which has resulted in widespread hereditary deafness and the emergence of a local village-based sign language. Naturally, as this is a sign language, all files are video recordings, including casual conversations, narratives, and linguistic elicitations on various topics.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/33ed0fb1-d26f-4dae-92c3-9984e9136b7d

    Investigation of an endangered village sign language in India
  • ZAUZOU YU LI

    DOCUMENTATION OF ZAUZOU, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE IN CHINA
    The major goal of this project is to document the language of Zauzou — a Lolo-Burmese language spoken in Southwestern China. Zauzou is an endangered language (Bradley, 2007) spoken by approximately 2100 members of the Nu nationality. Among those speakers, 1800 live on the banks of Lancang River, Lanping Country,Yunnan province in mainland of China. Most Zauzou speakers are older bilingual adults who also speak Mandarin, Bai, Lisu, etc. There are two major dialects — Guoli and Jiangmo Dialect. About 70 percent of Zauzou speakers speak the second dialect. This project documents a variety of recordings, including conversations, narratives and expository texts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bc64e9fe-4ce0-4af7-b79d-39d73e6ff66f

    Documentation of Zauzou, an endangered language in China
  • ZAUZOU YU LI

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): ZAUZOU
    Documentation of expressions of causality in Zauzou, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language. This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/85c6cfab-60b6-4338-b489-818c84e15ac2

    Causality Across Languages (CAL): Zauzou
  • LEMO JINGQI FU

    DOCUMENTING LEMO, A DIALECT OF BAI SPOKEN IN THE NUJIANG VALLEY OF YUNNAN PROVINCE, CHINA
    Lemo is considered a Northern Branch of the Bai language. It is spoken by 12,000 people in the Nujiang Valley of the Yunnan Province in China. Lemo culture and language faces a decline due to the encroachment of Lisu and Mandarin Chinese. The current project aims at working with the Language Community to document its language in its dynamic daily uses and cultural performances. It will produce a working orthography, a language learning manual, partially annotated digital audio and video materials that represent the cultural and linguistic practices, a dictionary, and a sketch grammar.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a9ec3eb6-f76c-4103-bae2-ca4218b52777

    Documenting Lemo, a dialect of Bai spoken in the Nujiang Valley of Yunnan Province, China
  • GELAO JINFANG LI

    DOCUMENTATION OF TWO GELAO VARIETIES: ZOU LEI AND A HOU, SOUTH WEST CHINA
    This project documents Zou Lei and A Hou, two varieties of Gelao, a member of the Tai-Kadai family in South West China. One of the most endangered languages in China, Gelao is now used by only 15-20 elderly people in Zhenning and Dafang counties of Guizhou Province. The project devotes special attention to documenting the cultural and ethnographical aspects of the languages in question. Eventual outcomes are: a grammar, a lexicon, and annotated texts for each of the languages. Audio-visual files are incorporated in printed works. A website will be constructed to provide access to project materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0e059cd5-9d21-4a76-b582-ed38e44a5592

  • TURUNG, SINGPHO STEPHEN MOREY

    A COMPREHENSIVE COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF THE TURUNG AND SINGPHO LANGUAGES OF ASSAM
    This collection documents two related languages of the Jinghpaw group within Tibeto-Burman: Turung, with perhaps 1000 speakers and Singpho, with perhaps 2500 speakers. The languages are spoken in Arunachal Pradesh and Assam, India, and are under threat from increasing use of Assamese. This deposit provides a comprehensive documentation of both Turung and Singpho, consisting of over 1200 audio files with transcriptions and English translations of some of the recordings. The recordings include traditional stories, songs and procedural texts, with particular emphasis being placed on collecting natural usage of the language and recording texts from elderly informants who were identified as being knowledgeable in a particular field.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3138ee70-3c64-42bc-bdf9-f3b66bbd5ce6

    A comprehensive comparative grammar of the Turung and Singpho languages of Assam
  • TAI-KHAMYANG PALASH KUMAR NATH

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE ORAL LITERATURE OF THE TAI KHAMYANG COMMUNITY IN UPPER ASSAM, INDIA
    Tai-Khamyang (ISO 639-3:ksu) is a highly endangered language of the Tai-kadai family spoken in the Upper Assam area of Northeast India. With only 25-20 (appx) fluent native speakers, this language is facing extinction as young generation shift to Assamese the state language and English. This collection is the result of a research project on Tai-Khamyang, which was developed in dialogue with the Tai-Khamyang community. The collection includes audio and video documentation of the oral and written traditions (history, traditional stories, songs, rituals, manuscripts, etc.) still narrated and sung by some of the older members of the community. These recordings were then used to produce textbooks and other language learning materials for the Tai-Khamyang Mother Tongue School, to help revitalize the use this language by its young native speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1e26faaa-8ede-4886-9094-85d97989fdc2

    Documentation of the oral literature of the Tai Khamyang community in Upper Assam, India
  • CHOGUITA RARAMURI GABRIELA CABALLERO

    CHOGUITA RARAMURI (TARAHUMARA) DOCUMENATION AND DESCRIPTION
    This deposit consists of audio and video recordings with transcriptions and photos of speakers of Choguita Rarámuri, or Tarahumara, an under-described language Uto-Aztecan language spoken in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, resulting from fieldwork conducted between January 2006 and December 2009.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b40f0f7b-2a59-4d82-b970-e0d5850a19fb

    Choguita Raramuri (Tarahumara) documenation and description
  • PUMA NARAYAN SHARMA

    A CORPUS-BASED REFERENCE ACCOUNT OF THE MORPHOLOGY OF PUMA
    Puma is a seriously endangered southern Kiranti language spoken mainly in the Khotang district of eastern Nepal. It is estimated that there are about 4000 Puma native speakers. In order to contribute to the preservation of the Puma language, this collection contains video and audio files of their corresponding text files (Toolbox files). Some toolbox files have been glossed to show rich and complex system of verb morphology for in-depth analysis. This deposit also includes ELAN files and dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1305ebb4-64d1-40d4-aa4c-486b47b23e8d

    A Corpus-based Reference Account of the Morphology of Puma
  • CAIJIA Lü SHANSHAN, WANG JIAN

    CAIJIA: CROSS-DIALECTAL DOCUMENTATION OF A HIGHLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE IN GUIZHOU PROVINCE OF CHINA
    Caijia is an extremely endangered language spoken by less than 1,000 Cai people (Bureau of Ethnic Identification in Bijie 1982), a group with a very small population scattered in northwestern Guizhou Province of China. It is the language used inside the family-based communities of Cai. The genetic affiliation of Caijia remains unclear. This project aims to document several dialects of Caijia spoken in Weining, Hezhang and Liupanshui counties of Guizhou and yields corpora of audio, video, and text data, a sketch grammar, a collection of stories as well as a comprehensive dictionary with English and Mandarin translations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/62efdecb-6b1c-407d-96f3-ea2266571441

    Caijia: Cross-dialectal documentation of a highly endangered language in Guizhou Province of China
  • YAKKHA DIANA SCHACKOW

    DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF YAKKHA, NEPAL
    This collection of Yakkha languages includes an annotated corpus of audio data, a trilingual dictionary, photos and kinship charts. The data were collected between 2009 and 2012 as a basis for a grammar of Yakkha. Genres of the collected texts cover narratives, conversations, descriptions of traditions and material culture, songs, verbal paradigms and pear stories. The collection also includes legacy data from school books and other locally available materials that were scanned and will be included in this collection.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d76bd932-9390-4c02-b7c9-1e8aa76b7234

  • KOYI RAI AIMEE LAHAUSSOIS

    A GRAMMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE KOHI RAI LANGUAGE OF EASTERN NEPAL
    Koyi Rai is a Tibeto-Burman language of the Kiranti group spoken by about 2000 people in Eastern Nepal. Due to contact with the national language Nepali (an Indo-Aryan language), Koyi is becoming seriously endangered, with no remaining monolingual speakers. This deposit consists of audio recordings with transcriptions of speakers of Koyi Rai, resulting from fieldwork conducted between April 2004 and November 2007.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fdb60c98-427f-4502-b8bc-ce3d92ad0917

  • KURTOEP GWENDOLYN HYSLOP

    THE DOCUMENTATION OF BARK-CLOTH MAKING: AN ENDANGERED CULTURAL ACTIVITY AMONG THE BAGANDA
    This collection is one of the first documentation efforts of Kurtöp, an endangered language of Lhüntse, Bhutan. It includes audio and video files of the language as spoken by its speakers from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences between November 2005 to January 2009. The audio and video files comprise of conversations, interviews, narratives, storytelling, singing and elicitation, including files used for acoustic study.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/33008f1a-2431-4ee2-817c-e6274646fde2

  • HRUSSOO AKA VIJAY ALWIN D'SOUZA

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE HRUSSO AKA LANGUAGE OF ARUNACHAL PRADESH
    This project aims to document and describe Hrusso Aka, a language spoken by about 3000 speakers in the West Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh, India. It is an interesting language because of its dissimilarities with other languages in the region. It is highly endangered due to a rapid language shift to Hindi. The project will involve collection, annotation and archiving of video, audio and text samples of Hrusso Aka, and production of a written grammar, primers, a dictionary and digital media outputs. The project also aims to train local language consultants in orthography, literature development and language support.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5fda5419-65db-4d7b-8d19-3477b48e3195

    Documentation and Description of the Hrusso Aka Language of Arunachal Pradesh
  • SUNWAR DöRTE BORCHERS, DöRTE BORCHERS

    KOIC (SUNWAR) ACCOUNTS OF TRADITION AND RELIGION
    The language commonly known as Sunwar in English. Sunwar is a Tibet-Burman language of eastern Nepal, spoken by around 25000 people in the districts of Okhaldhunga and Ramechap, and as a result of migration, also in Kathmandu. This deposit includes a recorded and transcribed Sunwar text in which four people originating from different villages talk about traditional festivals and practices, which are called ‘Mukdum’ in their language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6e9c587c-2d84-410e-b174-ca5e312d2060

  • GONGDUK KARMA TSHERING

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE FLORA AND FAUNA OF GONGDUK
    This project will produce the first documentation of the Gongduk language, an endangered language spoken by up to 2,000 people in a remote region of Eastern Bhutan. The precise classification remains unknown, though it is tentatively considered a Tibeto-Burman isolate. In addition to documenting the language in a variety of contexts and producing a phonological analysis and grammatical sketch, the core of this project will be to produce a full ethnobotanical analysis of Gongduk flora and fauna.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bf18e850-65ce-40cb-9df4-5e1a95e4e33f

  • KAGATE, YOLMO LAUREN GAWNE

    KAGATE (SYUBA), AN ENDANGERED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE OF NEPAL
    Kagate is an endangered member of the Central Bodic branch of the Tibeto-Burman family, spoken by around 1500 people in Ramechhap (Eastern Nepal). Younger community members now prefer Nepali and English for education and economic opportunity. There are very few written materials in Kagate, and no recordings of traditional songs, stories and cultural practices. Speakers of Kagate would like to document these genres before they are lost, and to create resources to help promote use of Kagate at all ages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f05cc077-2c74-4f69-89c6-a188a8acca50

    Kagate (Syuba), an endangered Tibeto-Burman language of Nepal
  • 'OLEKHA GWENDOLYN HYSLOP

    DOCUMENTATION OF ‘OLEKHA, WITH A FOCUS ON TRADITIONAL ETHNOBOTANICAL KNOWLEDGE
    The Olekha language has five remaining speakers living in the remote Rukha village of south central Bhutan. Most of the community today speaks Dzongkha, the national language. Phobjip is spoken just north of the area. The community has shifted to an agricultural lifestyle from a former hunter gatherer lifestyle within the past 50 years, retaining aspects of the former culture. Among these is a rich reliance on local plant life. This project, working in collaboration with the Dzongkha Development Commission and the Bhutan Oral Literature and Language Documentation Projects, documents the Olekha language, focusing on ethnobotanical knowledge.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4a9d86a5-55c1-4a47-ac2e-88d67e4870ea

  • NYENKHA WANGCHUK RINZIN

    LINGUISTIC AND ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION OF WESTERN DIALECTS OF NYENKHA SPOKEN IN PHOBJIKHA VALLEY IN WANGDUEPHODRANG, BHUTAN
    Nyenkha is a nearly extinct East Bodish dialect spoken at Phobjikha (<300 people) and Wangduephodrang (<3000), Western Bhutan by an illiterate minority without national participation. Elderly people speak and understand well; middle-aged have limited competence, children neither speak nor understand Nyenkha due to its lack of value in marketplace and official settings. Documentation includes linguistic and ethno-cultural database, audio/video/photographic records of conversation, interviews, oral literature/folk genres, leading to grammatical sketches and an initial dictionary fragment. Generated archival data will facilitate future maintenance and revitalization efforts, and provide evidence for understanding local language and identity in both historical and structural dimensions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1f737354-dea4-4f5a-acd8-09e42c884d19

    Linguistic and ethnographic documentation of Western dialects of Nyenkha spoken in Phobjikha valley in Wangduephodrang, Bhutan
  • NORTHERN PRINMI HENRIETTE DAUDEY, GERONG PINCUO

    DOCUMENTATION OF NORTHERN PRINMI ORAL ART, WITH A SPECIAL FOCUS ON RITUAL SPEECH
    Northern Prinmi (ISO 639: pmi, +27° 55'45", +101° 16'49"), a Tibeto-Burman language spoken in China by several thousand ethnically Pumi in northern Yunnan Province and an estimated 40,000 ethnically Tibetan in southern Sichuan Province, is increasingly endangered due to the development of large-scale infrastructure in the region, urbanisation, and the influence of Southwestern Mandarin Chinese. This project will document Northern Prinmi oral art, with a special focus on ritual speech, one of the domains of the language that is more severely threatened by disappearance. The project will result in a collection of annotated video and audio texts and rituals.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/59867362-e8e0-4f5a-bb11-9474b897c060

  • MONPA/MöNPA TIM MOTZ

    TAWANG IN NE INDIA: RECORDINGS OF TRADITIONAL AND LITURGICAL LOCAL MUSIC
    The Mönpa people of Tawang are Tibetan Buddhist and culturally closely related to nearby Tibet and Bhutan. This collection contains 68 hours of traditional music recorded in 2009. It contains both folk music and religious music, recorded villages, monasteries and nunneries throughout the region. Particular attention was given to the songs of the 6th Dalai Lama, who came from Tawang, and the epic of Gesar. While most recordings are in Mönpa, some are also in Tibetan, Bhutanese, and Hindi.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/edc05524-b56c-4d2b-ad9f-e73d38d71306

    Tawang in NE India: recordings of traditional and liturgical local music
  • EASTERN MEWAHANG, WESTERN MEWAHANG NARAYAN SHARMA

    LINGUISTIC DESCRIPTION AND COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION OF MEWAHANG, AN UNDESCRIBED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE OF NEPAL
    Mewahang, an oral Tibeto-Burman language, has approximately 900 remaining speakers living in the remote and isolated villages of the Sankhuwasabha district of eastern Nepal. This project aims to describe morphosyntax of the langauge and document rapidly disappearing cultural knowledge, unique oral tradition, recipes and shamanistic practices, which otherwise would be lost.The outcomes of this project will be a monograph, peer-reviewed linguistic papers on morphosyntactic investigations, and rich transcribed, translated and annotated audio-video corpus. The research crucially will shed light on Tibeto-Burman linguistics and typological studies of languages, which promises to be a contribution to Tibeto-Burman and theoretical linguistics.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f5307c2e-7b7a-4858-8044-b15e7f82123c

    Linguistic Description and Comprehensive Documentation of Mewahang, an undescribed Tibeto-Burman language of Nepal
  • DULONG ROSS PERLIN

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF DULONG (TRUNG)
    Dulong (Trung) is a Tibeto-Burman language of the little-known Nungish branch, spoken in Gongshan Nu and Dulong Autonomous County, Yunnan Province, China, in villages alongside the Nu and Dulong rivers. While the language is still in full use by the community, this collection forms part of a project documenting a comprehensive multimedia documentation that can serve as a basis for language maintenance efforts and provide data previously unavailable to scholars and others interested in the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a936df8c-7586-4873-a5e1-eda18ae804c4

    Documentation and description of Dulong (Trung)
  • KONG JO RA BA GARETH SPARHAM

    TIBETAN DIALECTS FROM SOUTHERN KHAM
    Lessons for a beginner level understanding of the dialects based on the model in Tournadre and Dorje’s Manual of Standard Tibetan. Includes dialogues by native speakers, some transliteration in IPA, and occasional notes on grammar and vocabulary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1717f8f3-d28f-49bf-8906-d483e7f24c28

    Tibetan Dialects from Southern Kham
  • GARUWI (SOUTHERN BASKARDI) GERARDO BARBERA

    LINGUISTIC DOCUMENTATION OF GARUWI
    The goal of this project is to document Southern Baškardi (Hormozgan, Southeast Iran), focusing on the endangered dialect of Garu. Baškardi has received very little attention in Iranian studies so far: the project aims at the collection of primary data (audio and video recordings of a wide range of communicative events) through the involvement of the community in the documentation practice. All recordings will be transcribed and translated, and at least 15% of texts will be annotated in detail. Documentation will include a sketch grammar and an electronic lexicon of about 5,000 entries, with English and Farsi as target languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b7ed5051-1724-4049-9ba3-e2f0bca2f201

    Linguistic Documentation of Garuwi
  • SUREL DORTE BORCHERS

    SUREL NARRATIONS ABOUT EVERYDAY LIFE AND VILLAGE HISTORY
    Surel is a hitherto undescribed, and with less than 30 active speakers, threatened Tibeto-Burman language of Nepal. This deposit contains audio and associated transcriptions about the everyday life of villagers, as well as anthropologically interesting information about work, food and clothing in a Nepalese village 50 years ago.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e70d4efb-f277-49e2-ab17-d657f1d5edc6

    Surel narrations about everyday life and village history
  • TAMANG THOMAS OWEN-SMITH

    CROSS-VARIETAL DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF TAMANG
    Tamang (ISO-639: taj) is a Tibeto-Burman language spoken over a large but sparsely populated area in Central and Eastern Nepal (27°5’N, 85-86°E), and exhibiting considerable geographical variation which is still poorly understood. All varieties of the language are now threatened by Nepali. This deposit aims to produce a wide-ranging documentation of Tamang with a focus on the most endangered varieties, including a corpus of audio, video and texts, a descriptive study of features shared and diverging between varieties, and a polylectal trilingual dictionary in Tamang, Nepali and English.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a924fc82-140e-4787-88b9-8a07aece2ed3

  • BRAHUI FATEMEH SHEYBANIFARD

    BRAHUI LANGUAGE OF RUDBAR-JONUB (IRAN)
    The Brahui Language of Rudbar-Jonub is the prevalent language in Tom-Meyri village, located in the southern part of Rudbar town in Kerman Province, Iran. Brahui of Rudbar-Jonub is one of the non-Iranian languages spoken in Iran. The majority of speakers live in the Sistan and Baluchistan regions, but a group with a population of about 750 people inhabit in the southern part of Rudbar town. This collection aims to provide a comprehensive videography-based documentation through a text corpus with audio-visual recordings of naturally generated discourse occurring around endangered lifecycle rituals and special cultural and linguistic features, as well as a dictionary of terms around traditional arts and crafts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6a876738-cfc3-4c0e-9ef9-2f9c00e7bb88

  • SOUTHERN AMAMI OSHIMA MARTHA TSUTSUI BILLINS

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SOUTHERN AMAMI OSHIMA
    This deposit contains data from speakers of Southern Amami Oshima (known as "shimaguchi" by speakers). Southern Amami Oshima is a Northern Ryukyuan language spoken on the Amami islands (Kagoshima prefecture). The data was collected by Martha Tsutsui Billins, linguist and principal investigator and the by community members themselves. This data was collected during fieldwork for the primary investigator’s PhD project, which focused on honorifics and politeness strategies of Amami speakers, primarily based on ethnography. Upon completion of archiving this project’s materials, this collection will contain video, audio, transcription, and photo files.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d5f1d4bd-1a9c-4f86-8813-f8ebaa656834

    Documentation and Description of Southern Amami Oshima
  • NAMUYI CHENGLONG HUANG

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE NAMUYI LANGUAGE
    Namuyi is an endangered Qiangic language of the Tibeto-Burman family spoken along the lower reaches of the Yalong River in south-western Sichuan Province, China. It has a reported 200 monolinguals and an ethnic population of 5,000. This collection of Namuyi includes a 5,000-entry trilingual (Chinese-English-Namuyi) lexicon, a volume of annotated texts, and a bilingual (Chinese & English) web site, as well as digital audio and video documentation materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/49bdf696-8ede-4a4f-9c80-0f6987a267ea

  • XUMI EKATERINA CHIRKOVA

    XUMI: DOCUMENTATION OF A HIGHLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF SOUTH-WEST CHINA
    The Xumi or Shuhi language (a.k.a. Shixing, ISO 639-3 sxg) is a little studied Tibeto-Burman language, comprising two sub-varieties with restricted mutual intelligibility (Upper Xumi and Lower Xumi). This deposit is based on Xumi data collected by the research team of the project “Ersu and Xumi: Comparative and Cross-Varietal Documentation of Highly Endangered Languages of South-West China” (MDP0257, 2013-2017), funded by the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP) of SOAS, University of London. The collection comprises audio and video recordings of personal narratives, traditional stories, traditional songs, conversations, elicitations from Mandarin Chinese (using both written and non-written stimuli), and translations from Mandarin Chinese collected in the Lizu-speaking areas in Southwest China. Some recordings are accompanied by annotations including the following layers of analysis:
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b115c458-4687-4183-8313-b134b86f41f8

    Xumi: Documentation of a Highly Endangered Language of South-West China
  • KIKAI-RYUKYUAN RIHITO SHIRATA

    LINGUISTIC DATA OF KIKAI-RYUKYUAN
    The deposited data are recordings of endangered Kikai-Ryukyuan, a traditional local language spoken on the Kikai Island. With the aim of documentation and description of the local language, we recorded natural discourse, folklores, songs and elicitation sessions for analyzing phonology, morphology and syntax of the language. We focused especially on the dialect spoken in Kamikatetsu (the southern-most village on the island) and the dialect spoken in Onotsu (the northern-most village on the island). The Kikai Island is located near Amami-?shima island, at the northeast end of the Ryukyuan-speaking area and administered by Kikai Town, ?shima District, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The island has an area of 56.94 km2, a population of 7,989 (as of the end of May 2013 according to the document published by the town). There are more than thirty villages on Kikai island, so that Kikai Ryukyuan enjoys a relatively rich variety in vocabulary, phonology, and morphology. Fluent speakers of of the traditional linguistic variations are mostly in their fifties and older. Younger generations only have passive command or limited lexical knowledge of the dialects.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9261aab6-bb7f-4f12-aaf1-4c336f4fb3e5

    Linguistic data of Kikai-Ryukyuan
  • LIZU EKATERINA CHIRKOVA

    LIZU: DOCUMENTATION OF A HIGHLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF SOUTH-WEST CHINA
    This deposit is based on data collected by the research team of the project “Ersu and Xumi: Comparative and Cross-Varietal Documentation of Highly Endangered Languages of South-West China” (MDP0257, 2013-2017), funded by the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP) of SOAS, University of London. The collection comprises audio and video recordings of personal narratives, traditional stories, traditional songs, conversations, elicitations from Mandarin Chinese (using both written and non-written stimuli), and translations from Mandarin Chinese collected in the Lizu-speaking areas in Southwest China. Some recordings are accompanied by annotations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/653a8b5b-6d41-4a48-acdd-ddb49958ccf0

    Lizu: Documentation of a Highly Endangered Language of South-West China
  • MILANG YANKEE MODI

    DOCUMENTATION OF A LOCAL ARCHIVE FOR MILANG, AN ENDANGERED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE OF NORTH EAST INDIA
    This collection documents Milang, a highly endangered and virtually unknown Tibeto-Burman language spoken by around 2,000 people in the far north-east of Arunachal Pradesh State in north-east India. During a six-month fieldtrip to Arunachal Pradesh, a rich video- and audio-based corpus of texts was collected, and a local language archive was established for the benefit of Milang people.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/823dd5fc-965a-4613-bbaa-db965b358cb6

  • MINYONG MARK POST

    A DOCUMENTATION OF THE UPPER BELT VARIETY OF MINYONG (ADI), ARUNACHAL PRADESH, NORTH EAST INDIA
    This collection documents the Upper Belt variety of Minyong, a language of the Adi cluster of Eastern Tani languages (ISO639-3:adi). Spoken by approximately 20,000 traditionally animist hill tribespeople in eastern central Arunachal Pradesh state, north-east India, Upper Belt Minyong is currently almost completely undocumented and in an increasingly endangered state due primarily to the meteoric rise of Hindi in the region. Special attention is given to documentation of animist Minyong ritual speech and practices, which are acutely threatened by disappearance within the present age.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4488320e-6534-493c-b165-8f6d8596fa48

  • BARAAMU YOGENDRA PRASAD YADAVA

    LINGUISTIC AND ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION OF BARAM
    Baram is a Tibeto-Burman language spoken by the Darai people in Chitwan and Tanahun Districts in Central and Western Nepal and is on the brink of extinction, having less than 50 remaining speakers. This deposit contains the lexical database, sound files and images for the Baram (Baraamu) dictionary. Additional ethnographic and linguistic materials, as well as the published dictionary, can be found in the deposit “Linguistic and ethnographic documentation of Baram”.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d1f2be4c-0be3-4d9b-abef-ee5973e3c376

    Linguistic and ethnographic documentation of Baram
  • DUOXU EKATERINA CHIRKOVA, HAN ZHENGKANG

    DUOXU: DOCUMENTATION OF A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF SOUTH-WEST CHINA
    Duoxu is a little-known and virtually undescribed Tibeto-Burman language, spoken in Mianning county, which is located in the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan province in the People’s Republic of China. Together with Lizu and Ersu, two closely related languages, Duoxu is currently classified as a member of the Qiangic subgroup of the Tibeto-Burman language family (the central dialect of the Ersu language, ISO-639 ers). This deposit is based on Duoxu data collected by the research team of the project “Ersu and Xumi: Comparative and Cross-Varietal Documentation of Highly Endangered Languages of South-West China” (MDP0257, 2013-2017), funded by the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP) of SOAS, University of London. The collection comprises audio and video recordings of personal narratives, traditional stories, traditional songs, conversations, elicitations from Mandarin Chinese (using both written and non-written stimuli), and translations from Mandarin Chinese collected in the Lizu-speaking areas in Southwest China.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6638eb9a-647e-49c4-8420-73ba8dc0dd54

    Duoxu: Documentation of a Critically Endangered Language of South-West China
  • PINGJIANG SHENKAI ZHANG

    PINGJIANG TRADITIONAL LOVE SONGS
    Pingjiang is a dialect of Han Chinese spoken in Pingjiang County, in the northeast of Hunan Province. The Pingjiang Traditional Love Songs archiving project includes audio recordings and an annotated Toolbox text containing transcriptions for all of the audio files.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e378a14b-40ad-40de-b4c2-aac52e3921e4

    Pingjiang traditional love songs
  • GYALSUMDO JOHN JOSEPH PERRY

    PRELIMINARY DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF GYALSUMDO, AN UNDOCUMENTED TIBETAN LANGUAGE OF MANANG, NEPAL
    This project aims to document and describe the Gyalsumdo language, an endangered, undocumented Tibetan language spoken in Manang district, Nepal, spoken by approximately 200 people. The project will involve the production of a corpus of audio and video recordings of a wide range of genres and registers, a sketch grammar, a trilingual glossary, and a detailed study of the language's tonal behaviour and its interaction with syntax.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f3ba8fcf-6be1-4d02-a24b-b506ec663e8c

    Preliminary documentation and description of Gyalsumdo, an undocumented Tibetan language of Manang, Nepal
  • NAR-PHU KRISTINE HILDEBRANDT

    NAR-PHU (TIBETO-BURMAN, NEPAL): FIELD RESEARCH FOR AN AUDIO-VISUAL ARCHIVE OF COMPARATIVE LEXICAL AND DISCOURSE MATERIAL
    Nar and Phu are mutually intelligible variants of the TGTM (Tamangic) sub-grouping of Tibeto-Burman, and are spoken in villages of the same names in Nepal. This collection includes documentation and archival quality data on Nar-Phu towards a comparative lexical database with Nepali and Nyeshangte. In addition, this collection also includes a transcribed, annotated corpus to facilitate analyses of the discourse function of morphosyntactic structures and a Nar-Phu/Nepali word book aimed at primary school use, and copies of recordings for community archives and references.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8292d4b0-9092-4b89-96ef-05d2618a2824

    Nar-Phu (Tibeto-Burman, Nepal): Field Research for an Audio-Visual Archive of Comparative Lexical and Discourse Material
  • KAIKE MARIEKE MEELEN

    AN AUDIO-VISUAL ARCHIVE AND SEARCHABLE CORPUS OF KAIKE, AN ENDANGERED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE OF DOLPA, NEPAL
    Kaike (ISO 639-3 kzq, 82E; 28N, ca. 800-1000 speakers) is an endangered Tibeto-Burman language spoken in Dolpa, Nepal. All speakers of Kaike are fluent in Nepali and Poinke Tibetan as well and Kaike is not used in writing, religious contexts, songs or education. This project will provide high-quality audio-visual materials to preserve the language for the local and linguistic community. These materials will furthermore be transcribed and translated and donated to the local community as a collection of traditional stories and practices they could use as teaching material. Finally, the texts will be morpho-syntactically annotated to provide a searchable corpus for anyone interested in the rich typology of the languages of the Himalaya or Kaike's interesting linguistic features.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b57c6669-e7a7-41d1-8f09-7665fc535445

    An audio-visual archive and searchable corpus of Kaike, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language of Dolpa, Nepal
  • SEKE ROSS PERLIN

    DOCUMENTING SEKE STORIES
    Seke, a little-documented Tibeto-Burman language of the Tamangic branch, has at most 700 speakers from five villages of the Mustang District in northern Nepal. Today the language is highly endangered, with few speakers under 40 years old, massive outmigration of all but the elderly, and even older speakers shifting overwhelmingly to Nepali. Building on an ongoing Columbia University Field Methods class, ”Documenting Seke Stories" aims to create an annotated corpus of video and audio recordings including folktales, oral histories, and a wide range of other narratives reflecting the lives and stories of Seke speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7aaa3385-9644-4b0c-bb2a-2b5e60202df7

    Documenting Seke Stories
  • ERSU EKATERINA CHIRKOVA, WANG DEHE

    ERSU: DOCUMENTATION OF AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF SOUTH-WEST CHINA
    Ersu is an endangered Tibeto-Burman language cluster, comprising three mutually unintelligible languages: Ersu, Duoxu, and Lizu, spoken by language communities in the western part of Sichuan Province in the People’s Republic of China. The main focus of the collection is on the variety of Ersu, as spoken in Ganluo County. The deposit includes 177 traditional Ersu stories and song lyrics transcribed in the Ersu Romanization System and translated into Mandarin Chinese. It also comprises audio and video recordings of conversations and elicitations from Mandarin Chinese (using both written and non-written stimuli) collected in all Ersu-speaking areas.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ca255ae9-7e2c-4869-b5d0-d2d9a23c5454

    Ersu: Documentation of an Endangered Language of South-West China
  • ERSU DEHE WANG

    A COMPREHENSIVE ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY OF ERSU WITH AUDIO FILES
    The project builds on the results from the prior ELDP project (MDP0257) to arrive at a first-ever, comprehensive illustrated dictionary of the Ersu language, accompanied by audio files. Ersu is a little-studied, endangered Tibeto-Burman (Qiangic) language, spoken by approximately 8,000 people from an overall ethnic population of ca. 16,800 people in rural areas of Southwest China. The project will yield (1) a dictionary of 5,000 entries compiled in accordance with best lexicographic practices, and (2) a corpus of audio and video data documenting endangered meanings, that is, words related to such domains as traditional material culture, aphorisms, epigrams, and proverbs.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5cb099fd-714f-4669-a4f8-3d6a7a9f5730

  • SIWI VALENTINA SCHIATTARELLA

    SIWI NARRATIVE AND CONVERSATION RECORDINGS
    The deposit is the result of a documentation project on the Siwi language (Berber language family, Afroasiatic phylum) funded by an ELDP Small Grant (2012-2013). The collection includes a corpus of primary data useful for the community and for researchers who work on the comparison of different varieties of Berber. It is composed of a large selection of genres and topics and it is particularly interesting because it focuses on data elicited from women, which is quite rare due to social factors in the area.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0f46b5d2-4075-40f4-a5f5-178e440d91da

    Siwi narrative and conversation recordings
  • EASTERN MINYAG AGNES CONRAD, WANG BAOBAO

    EASTERN MINYAG, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF WESTERN SICHUAN
    Eastern Minyag is an endangered Tibeto-Burman language a spoken by perhaps no more than 1,000 individuals living in a cluster of villages located in Shimian County, Sichuan, China. This collection contains audio-visual documentation of over 20 hours of oral literature, songs, and spontaneous conversation. While no analyses have been conducted on the data to date, Simplified Chinese translations are available for almost all recordings. English and Written Tibetan translations are also available for select recordings. Data was primarily collected by community member and native speaker Wang Baobao, with technical assistance provided by Agnes and Winifred Conrad.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/87ff847d-140e-4d48-a265-0be3e7c03708

    Eastern Minyag, an endangered language of Western Sichuan
  • TORWALI INAM ULLAH

    DOCUMENTATION OF ORAL TEXTS (LIFE HISTORIES, FOLK TALES, LOCAL HISTORICAL LORE), POEMS, IDIOMS AND RIDDLES OF TORWALI
    Torwali is one of at least 24 lesser-known languages of northern Pakistan, many of which remain largely unwritten and have had little exposure in the international academic community. Torwali has a small community of speakers (80-90,000), and close to half its speakers have migrated permanently to the bigger cities of Pakistan where their language is being replaced by Urdu or other languages of wider communication such as Pashto. This collection includes a digital Torwali-English dictionary with audio.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/91667c29-bb0d-47fd-ab63-35f6ca527e38

    Documentation of oral texts (life histories, folk tales, local historical lore), poems, idioms and riddles of Torwali
  • WESTERN MINYAG AGNES CONRAD

    WESTERN MINYAG, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF WESTERN SICHUAN
    Western Minyag is an under-documented Tibeto-Burman language spoken by roughly 10,000 people in villages clustered around Gangkar Mountain (CH: Gongga Shan) in Kangding and Jiulong Counties, western Sichuan, China. This project produced audio-visual corpora documenting a variety of language uses and an M.A. thesis on the grammar of Western Minyag. It contains recordings from almost all known regional varieties. Translations have been accomplished for much of the data in Simplified Mandarin, English, and Standard Tibetan orthographies. Rich annotations and phonetic transcriptions are provided for over 10 hours of data in the form of ELAN files and a FLEx database.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0123a318-b7fd-469f-b0c2-56cf355f6fde

    Western Minyag, an endangered language of Western Sichuan
  • TOBIAN (RAMARI HATOHOBEI) PETER BLACK, BARBARA BLACK

    DOCUMENTING RAMARI HATOHOBEI, THE TOBIAN LANGUAGE, A SEVERELY ENDANGERED MICRONESIAN LANGUAGE
    Tobian (Ramari Hatohobei) is the language of Tobi, one of the Southwest Islands of the Republic of Palau, a Micronesian nation in the western Pacific. Severely endangered, Tobian is currently spoken by approximately 150 people. Tobian and the dialects of Sonsorol, Merir, and Pulo Anna, the other three Southwest Islands, are closely related to the languages spoken in the outer islands of Yap and Chuuk. Intensive work was done with elderly Tobian speakers to document their language through collection of vocabulary, stories, poems, and songs in their relevant socio-cultural context before it is lost.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/64bb8850-a53d-42b4-b162-23091d844831

    Documenting Ramari Hatohobei, the Tobian language, a severely endangered Micronesian language
  • TULEHU, ALLANG, HARUKU, AMAHEI MARGARET FLOREY

    DOCUMENTATION OF FOUR MORIBUND MOLUCCAN LANGUAGES
    This project will provide rich descriptions of four languages from the eastern Indonesian province of Central Maluku — a region with both high linguistic diversity and the highest level of language endangerment in Indonesia, yet which remains one of the most undescribed regions linguistically. A history of long-standing contact with non-indigenous peoples, colonisation, intensive trade, and conversion to non-indigenous religions have all played a role in language endangerment. The research team will document Soahuku/Amahei (Seram Island), Haruku (Haruku Island), and Allang and Tulehu (both of Ambon Island) in both the homeland and with remaining speakers in the Indonesian diaspora in the Netherlands. This project also incorporates the training of Community Language Workers in language documentation techniques in order to support language maintenance initiatives in both settings. Partner institutions include Pattimura University (Ambon), the MPI Field Station and Atma Jaya University (Jakarta), the Moluks Historisch Museum (Utrecht), and the KITLV (Leiden and Jakarta).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b7bb563e-e5fb-4c04-95dc-5f66245a63cc

    Documentation of four moribund Moluccan languages
  • SA’BAN CHARLOTTE HEMMINGS

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE SA’BAN LANGUAGE, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA
    This deposit includes audio and video materials collected as part of the Leverhulme Trust postdoctoral research project, ‘Information Structure in the Languages of Northern Sarawak’. The aim of the project was to combine documentation and description of three indigenous languages in Northern Sarawak, with research into the role that information structure plays in determining syntactic choices such as word order and voice choice.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/03604649-72a1-46d7-8343-bd1af1e234e0

    Documentation of the Sa’ban Language, Sarawak, Malaysia
  • CEQ WONG NICOLE KRUSPE

    CEQ WONG AND MAH MERI: THE DOCUMENTATION OF TWO ASLIAN LANGUAGES OF THE MALAY PENINSULA
    1) The Ceq Wong collection contains audio recordings of traditional narratives and autobiographical stories with transcriptions and notes, video recordings, a draft trilingual dictionary, and photos. 2) The Mah Meri collection contains audio and video recordings of story-telling, rituals and daily life, photographs, a trilingual dictionary, and maps recording Mah Meri place names.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5128fd69-dd5b-4ecd-b5a1-7273eac52c0f

  • SOU AMANA TERU SIMON MUSGRAVE, MARGARET FLOREY

    KNOWLEDGE OF ENDANGERED LANGUAGES IN THE SUDANESE COMMUNITY, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d85b5775-7caf-4e0f-9198-e2f2269ccf99

  • KELABIT CHARLOTTE HEMMINGS

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE KELABIT LANGUAGE, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA
    This deposit includes materials collected as part of a PhD research project to document and describe the Kelabit language, spoken in Northern Sarawak, Malaysia. It includes linguistic elicitation as well as naturalistic texts in a variety of genres, such as narratives, personal histories, procedural texts, conversations, formal speech, news reports and songs. Audio and video materials are transcribed using a provisional Kelabit orthography and translated into English using ELAN.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0c3af7c5-ad04-49ec-b5c1-d4284a7a1221

    Documentation of the Kelabit language, Sarawak, Malaysia
  • PALIKUR ELISSANDRA BARROS DA SILVA

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE PALIKUR (ARAWAK) LANGUAGE
    The Palikur is a group of about 2300 people. Around 1400 living in Brazil, at the Indigenous Land of Uaca¡, Oiapoque, Amapa, in 12 villages: Kuahi, Ywawka, Flecha, Mangue 1, Mangue 2, Tawari, Amomni, Kwikwit, Pwaytyeket, Kamuywa, Urubu and Kumene. About 900 living in Guyane. In Brazil 80% of natives speak Palikur and Portuguese. In Guyane the French is the mother tongue of youngsters. This project goal is to document in audio and video different genres of spoken Palikur in Brazil, ritualistic speak, narratives, chants, and that are not transmitted to new generations anymore.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/35d6732c-a5b8-40c7-a32c-9f7982ebe817

  • LUN BAWANG CHARLOTTE HEMMINGS

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE LUN BAWANG LANGUAGE, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA
    This deposit includes audio and video materials collected as part of the project ‘Information Structure in the Languages of Northern Sarawak’ which was funded by an Early Career Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust (ECF-2016-425). The aim of the project was to combine documentation and description of three indigenous languages in Northern Sarawak, with research into the role that information structure plays in determining syntactic choices such as word order and voice choice.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e91f2138-91eb-48c5-baf1-69f56dd42edc

    Documentation of the Lun Bawang Language, Sarawak, Malaysia
  • QUEYU (CHOYO ) XUAN GUAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF CHOYO (QUEYU) AND ITS CULTURAL TRADITIONS
    Queyu is an understudied and underdocumented Tibeto-Burman (TB) language spoken in Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. Though speakers are classified as Tibetans (Lu 1985: 67, Wang 1991: 46), Queyu belongs to the Qiangic branch instead of Tibetic, with approximately 6,000~7,000 speaker population. The goals of this project are: (1) the creation of a collection of Queyu texts, audio and video recordings that cover linguistic and sociocultural perspectives of the Queyu community (2) an annotated corpus of texts, video and audio recordings of natural and elicited Queyu data, (3) a Queyu-Mandarin-English dictionary, and (4) a sketch grammar of Queyu.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ca904a4b-501b-4453-89dd-fa73392b2e43

    Documentation of Choyo (Queyu) and its cultural traditions
  • KOASATI STEPHANIE HASSELBACHER

    KOASATI AND LANGUAGE PRACTICES OF THE COUSHATTA TRIBE
    Koasati (IS0 639-3:cku) is the language of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, still spoken fluently by approximately 200 people, the majority of whom live on or near the Coushatta Reservation outside Elton, Louisiana. This deposit contains 62 audio files and 22 video files, with accompanying transcriptions and translations. The majority of the files are semi-structured interviews, conducted by fluent Koasati speakers and/or the depositor, focusing on language practices, metalinguistic awareness, the history of education on the community, and cultural change on the Coushatta Reservation. Other genres include storytelling, cooking lessons, and casual conversation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/58af0418-f4f4-4285-8802-546e32719a63

    Koasati and Language Practices of the Coushatta Tribe
  • NYAGRONG MINYAG JOHN VAN WAY, BKRASHIS BZANGPO

    DOCUMENTATION OF NYAGRONG MINYAG, AN ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF WESTERN CHINA
    Nyagrong Minyag speakers number about 1,000 across two major dialect areas. All speakers are ethnically Tibetan and generally practice Tibetan Buddhism. They have traditionally subsisted on agriculture and herding. The name Nyagrong Minyag contains the autonym of its people “Minyag,” plus the name of the county “Nyagrong” in order to distinguish between other groups who identify as “Minyag”. This deposit contains audio and video recordings that document the history and cultural practices of the Nyagrong Minyag people. This includes the documentation of topics such as: wedding ceremonies, agricultural practices, traditional paper making techniques, dancing, folk songs, oral histories, and more. Other audio recordings in this deposit are centered around the phonetics, phonology, morpho-syntax and lexicon of Nyagrong Minyag. These include audio recordings of elicitation sessions targeting the sound system, grammar and lexicon of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1e2d5e51-bb7e-47ce-a5c7-926c3fa9576e

    Documentation of Nyagrong Minyag, an endangered language of Western China
  • JEWISH IRAQI ELI TIMAN

    JEWISH IRAQI SPOKEN LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION
    This collection contains personal stories, songs and descriptions of life in Iraq in the first half of the twentieth century, as told by Jewish Iraqi informants in London, Canada and Israel between 2006 and 2007.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d526c1ab-44d2-4c66-aef5-365f04afd3a8

    Jewish Iraqi spoken language documentation
  • CHHITKUL-RAKCHHAM PHILIPPE ANTOINE MARTINEZ

    DOCUMENTARY CORPUS OF CHHITKUL-RAKCHHAM, AN ENDANGERED TIBETO-BURMAN LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN INDIA
    This project will produce a documentary corpus on Chhitkul-Rakchham, a Tibeto-Burman language spoken across two villages in Himachal Pradesh, India. This will be the first ever corpus of Chhitkul-Rakchham. Unwritten and exclusively spoken at home, Chhitkul-Rakchham is endangered and threatened by the spread of Hindi. This project will collect a corpus of audio-video recordings of speech samples in different genres, primarily everyday conversations, but also narratives, traditional genres, and some elicited materials. The corpus will serve as a foundation for the development of further linguistic fieldwork and aid in the investigation of grammatical features and language support initiatives.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/23cecd70-2879-412f-bde1-456b0ea0ef1a

    Documentary Corpus of Chhitkul-Rakchham, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language of Northern India
  • QIANG NATHANIEL SIMS

    DOCUMENTATION OF YONGHE QIANG LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    This project will produce transcribed and annotated texts in Yonghe Qiang: an endangered Northeastern Tibet-Burman language spoken in Southeastern Mao County, Rngaba prefecture, Sichuan, China. There are about 2,000 speakers, but communities are shifting to Chinese. The culturally rich body of texts, which will include life-history interviews and naturally-occurring conversations by speakers of different ages and genders, will serve as the empirical materials for a grammatical description of the language. The materials collected will be shared with the community through both printed booklets and digital means. Native speakers will be involved as collaborators at all levels of the project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/91c9326c-6e76-4d8c-aafe-e3f1e7ceccab

    Documentation of Yonghe Qiang language and culture
  • DARI MAZIAR TOOSARVANDANI

    ZOROASTRIAN DARI
    A collection of audio recordings of Zoroastrian Dari consisting of: personal and community narratives, in which Iranian Zoroastrian speakers of Dari recount autobiographical information and well as aspects of the history of their own lives and/or of their village or the Zoroastrian community more broadly traditional stories and songs, in which speakers retell stories (and, in a few cases, recite songs) that are traditionally of religious and/or cultural significance a small number of additional items which do not fit clearly into either of the above categories, including coversations among several speakers at once, the explanation of a recipe, etc.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a1b3df96-5019-4829-88ed-d037f5992236

    Zoroastrian Dari
  • KO’ALH, KUMEYAAY MARGARET FIELD, AMY MILLER

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE BAJA CALIFORNIA YUMAN LANGUAGES KUMEYAAY AND KO’ALH
    This collection is the product of a language documentation project for two Baja California Yuman languages, Kumeyaay and Ko'alh, placing emphasis on discourse. The research team worked with native speakers to transcribe, translate, and analyze over 40 texts that we had previously collected, and used the results to expand our Ko'alh-Kumeyaay comparative dictionary database and write a grammatical sketch of Ko'alh.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b2b5fc14-4488-4be7-8663-54f30c8cd42a

    Documentation of the Baja California Yuman Languages Kumeyaay and Ko’alh
  • DARI SALOUMEH GHOLAMI

    DOCUMENTING A RELIGIOUS MINORITY: THE DARI DIALECT OF KERMAN, IRAN
    Zoroastrian Dari (a term not to be confused with classical Persian Dari or Dari in Afghanistan, also known as Behdini, Gavri or Gavruni) is an Iranian language spoken by the religious minority the Zoroastrians, who live mostly in the cities of Yazd and the surrounding areas, and in Kerman and Tehran. This collection aims to show different aspects of Zoroastrian culture and religion in addition to the language documentation. Our goal was to show the cultural and social background of the language community. The collection contains not only linguistic material, but also documentation of ceremonies, festivals, and Zoroastrian monuments, which are of particular importance for religious and cultural studies. The collection presents the Zoroastrian society in Kerman with their traditions, rituals, and other aspects of culture.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/83b54983-da89-4d68-824a-a857ef7cfd1f

    Documenting a religious minority: the Dari dialect of Kerman, Iran
  • MANDAEAN SABAH ALDIHISI

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE MANDAEAN’S RITUALS
    The Mandaean community consists of Mandaean speakers in Iraq and Iran. This collection provides classical Mandaean texts as well everyday vernacular conversation material in multimedia form.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9bf2417c-b9bd-4cd9-9158-bd07f045192f

    Documentation of the Mandaean’s Rituals
  • ZOROASTRIAN DARI SARAH STEWART

    VOICES FROM ZOROASTRIAN IRAN
    An oral studies project that maps the remaining Zoroastrian communities in Iran. In this deposit of 330 interviews Zoroastrians speak about their lives before and after the establishment of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Topics include religious and devotional life as well as issues such as emigration, education and marrying outside the community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7452521f-31bc-4f80-9870-27cf9fab2d06

    Voices from Zoroastrian Iran
  • CAHUILLA RAY HUAUTE

    EXPANDING THE DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF CONVERSATIONAL CAHUILLA
    Cahuilla is a Uto-Aztecan language spoken in the mountains and deserts near the Salton Sea in Southern California. It is severely endangered, with only 5 elderly speakers remaining. Documentation in the early twentieth century focused largely on elicited speech, resulting in a lack of quality data representative of conversational discourse and other genres of naturalistic, culturally relevant speech. Expanding the language documentation with high-quality audio and video will result in a robust language corpus that can be utilized for linguistic analysis and development of language learning materials. Project outcomes will contribute to language revitalization efforts and scholarly linguistic research.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5bc077b7-71a2-4f82-8ae9-909ac89eaf7a

  • JEJUAN SOUNG-U KIM

    A MULTI-MODAL DOCUMENTATION OF JEJUAN CONVERSATIONS
    Jejuan is spoken on several islands of Jeju Province of South Korea, with a number of diaspora speakers in Osaka, Japan. Traditionally treated as a variety of Korean that is unintelligible with other varieties, it was recognised as a critically endangered language by UNESCO in 2010. There are approximately 5,000 to 10,000 speakers, with fluent speakers all above the age of 70. This project aims at building an annotated audio-video corpus of spoken Jejuan with a focus on conversational genres, supplementing existing documentation of narratives and songs.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/782f88b5-8ab8-4fe7-8fd7-0a3beed850a2

    A multi-modal documentation of Jejuan conversations
  • JOWSHAQANI ESFANDIAR TAHERI

    DOCUMENTATION OF JOWSHAQANI, A CENTRAL IRANIAN LANGUAGE
    The project will document Jowshaqani, a Central Iranian language spoken in Jowshaqan township in northern Isfahan province in Iran. With 3500 inhabitants, Jowshaqan township is situated some 120 km north of the city of Isfahan at the border of an area where Central Iranian dialects are spoken. Jowshaqani is increasingly giving way to Persian and there are fewer than 600 fluent speakers of this language. This documentation will include audio and video recordings with transcriptions, translations and annotations of the recorded data. The project will also provide a Jowshaqani/English/Persian dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/50d87d77-4c64-4b4e-826b-021332279d70

    Documentation of Jowshaqani, a Central Iranian language
  • DOMARI BRUNO HERIN, ANKE AL-BATAINEH

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION BEIRUT DOMARI, AN ENDANGERED VARIETY OF DOMARI
    Domari is one of the very few diasporic Indic languages. It is spoken by the Middle Eastern Dom, commonly known as the Gypsies of the Middle East. There are no reliable figures about the number of speakers of Domari. The goal is to produce at least 20 hours of annotated audio and video recordings documenting a wide variety of textual genres, as well as to create material that will address the desire of the community to formally teach the language to various internal audiences. Specific outcomes will be the production of a grammatical sketch, a lexicon, a multimedia dictionary and a collection of narrative and procedural texts.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/88cf749b-2201-4c53-9431-2c383bb75523

    Documentation and description Beirut Domari, an endangered variety of Domari
  • DEHI ALIREZA HAMIDI MADANI

    DEHI OF ARAN AND BIDGOL: A CENTRAL IRANIAN LANGUAGE
    Dehi, which is also known as "Di" or "Zebu Mahalli" (local Language) among people, belongs to the central group of Western Iranian Languages and is spoken in some quarters of Aran and Bidgol in the north of Kashan in Isfahan province in Iran. Dehi is a severely endangered language from which the two dialects of Arani and Bidgoli are recognized both of which are almost identical.The number of speakers of the Dehi is not exactly clear, since its speakers only reside in three quarters, so the number of speakers is computed less than 1000 in the Bidgol and that's nearly 2000 people in the Aran.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d3d4a6b2-d83b-41d1-abe9-5c8b5f4bc638

    Dehi of Aran and Bidgol: A Central Iranian Language
  • ZABAN ESHAREH IRANI YASSAMAN CHOUBSAZ, ONNO CRASBORN

    WESTERN ZEI: IRANIAN SIGN LANGUAGE IN KERMANSHAH
    Zaban Eshareh Irani (ZEI) is a sign language used by Iranian deaf community. It has not been investigated whether there are variants of ZEI or not, but it seems likely that different variants of sign language exist in different parts of Iran. The deposit includes records of native signers living in Kermanshah. The recordings start with an elicitation task including items for concepts such as color, food, animals, etc. Subsequently, the participants are asked to watch short movies and then they are asked to retell the story. Later, the participants are asked to have conversations in pairs guided by a deaf moderator (Sara Karami). The data is recorded by Yassaman Choubsaz, linguist and principle investigator. A group consisting of two linguists (Yassaman Choubsaz and Sara Siyavoshi) and one deaf linguist (Farzaneh Soleinmanbeigi) collaborated to annotate some parts of the conversations. We also benefited from the support of Ardavan Guity (a deaf PhD student of linguistics). Onno Crasborn was the project coordinator, provided some instructions and training and handled some of the technical issues.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fd9bf6fb-8ba9-4cd9-b598-8662ee66d7d1

    Western ZEI: Iranian Sign Language in Kermanshah
  • KUNDAL SHAHI KHAWAJA A. REHMAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE KUNDAL SHAHI LANGUAGE, KUNDAL SHAHI, PAKISTAN
    This collection documents the Kundal Shahi language [shd], spoken in the village of Kundal Shahi, in the Neelam Valley of Pakistan-administered Kashmir. It belongs to the North Western zone of the Indo-Aryan language family. The total number of active speakers is less than 700 individuals. The language is severely endangered as it is increasingly being replaced by Hindko.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f29702ff-6cad-4fd5-91e3-39a63329f96a

  • HENAN OIRAT ATTILA RáKOS

    DOCUMENTING HENAN OIRAT, CHINA
    This collection aims to document the current state and last traces of the Mongolic language of the Henan Oirats. Henan Oirat (Henan Mongol) is the ethnic language of the Henan Oirats, a group of around 30,000 individuals, who inhabit Henan Mongol Autonomous County (Henan Mengguzu Zizhi Xian) of Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Huangnan Zangzu Zizhi Zhou), Qinghai Province, China. The materials in this collection were recorded at these locations in Henan County: Khusin on the southern fringe of the county, and Serlong on the south-eastern edge. Both are settlements with a population of approximately 2000-3000, and surrounding camp-sites of nomads.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8421ff4b-e6a4-4feb-b848-a140334ba75a

  • MONGGHUL BURGEL FAEHNDRICH

    DOCUMENTATION OF A DIALECT OF MONGGHUL AND A DIALECTOLOGICAL SURVEY OF MONGGHUL
    Mongghul is an endangered Mongolic language spoken in the Qinghai and Gansu provinces in China. Though the precise number of speakers is unknown, estimates are that around 50,000 people currently speak it. Most speakers of Mongghul are also bilingual in the local dialect of Chinese. This collection consists of a sketch grammar of one variety of Mongghul, including a description of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and a wordlist. Information on language contact and history is also included. In addition, there is a small dialectical survey of the documented and non-documented varieties of Mongghul.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6bd89b79-f9ba-49a3-b01b-bfac07ce7965

  • UPPER TAROMI RAHELEH IZADIFAR

    DOCUMENTING NEW YEAR CEREMONIES OF TATS OF UPPER TAROMI IN HAZARRUD
    This project documents traditional New Year ceremonies in Hazarrud village in Tarom district of Zanjin province in Iran, as recounted by the remaining Tati speakers of the village. The estimated number of Tats with an active command of this variety is less than 10, all more than 70 years old. The traditional New Years celebrations are no longer actually performed in the village, where the language of wider communication is now a variety of Azeri Turkic, or increasingly, standard Persian. The Tati dialect of Hazarrud has remained highly conservative when compared with other Tati dialects, and along with the cultural content, the project will contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of language shift and change in the highly diverse, and rapidly declining, Tatic group of languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/79d23da8-56a8-4ccb-85a5-5b5e5315b300

    Documenting New Year ceremonies of Tats of Upper Taromi in Hazarrud
  • GALESHI CARINA JAHANI

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE LANGUAGE AND LIFESTYLE OF THE GALESH
    The Galesh are herdsmen in the Alborz mountains of Iran. Their total number is unknown, but diminishing rapidly due to the modernisation of the Iranian society. This deposit contains a set of interviews with people whose lifestyle has undergone drastic changes in the past 50 years, from a cooperative system of cow herding to individual possession of a few cows or total abandoning of the traditional lifestyle. This change is well-described by five people who have experienced it themselves. There is also a professional film, which shows traditional methods of dairy production as well as daily life in Ziarat, religious ceremonies, cooking, weaving etc. and many photos.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2397f934-5701-403c-a41d-3a0ea6420d9e

    Documentation of the language and lifestyle of the Galesh
  • SORITH MIKHAEEL BENJAMIN

    DOCUMENTING THE LANGUAGE OF THE MODERN ASSYRIAN MOUNTAINEERS OF NALA: AN ANCIENT LANGUAGE ENDANGERED THOUGH MIGRATION AND OBLIVION.
    Modern Assyrian Language (Sorith) in Nala, a language of speakers among villagers of 7 pure Christian countries, These villages belong to Amadiya District / Duhok Governorate in Kurdistan / Iraq. The indigenous people, speaker of this language are about (1000) living in these villages. Their isolated and remote villages helped speakers keep their authentic language and vocabularies inherited thousands of years. In fact, the situation now is different and their language is endangered and vulnerable to die also due to the increase migrating to other places especially after ISIS appearance and also being obliged to go outside their area to work, a case that threatens the entity of their own and Assyrians in all in Iraq.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e29cdaaa-fc64-496c-ac34-1f4f1e55559f

  • TUROYO MIKAEL OEZ

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE BETH QUSTAN DIALECT OF THE CENTRAL NEO-ARAMAIC LANGUAGE, TUROYO
    The Beth Qustan dialect of the Central Neo-Aramaic, Turoyo, which is the language of Tur 'Abdin, South Eastern Turkey, with an estimated 20 families remaining in the village.This project will document socio-cultural practices of the Turoyo speaking community in Tur 'Abdin, focusing on vernacular tales, particularly those that demonstrate cultural interaction between Muslims and Christians, including Muslim visitations to the shrines of Christian saints, and consultation of soothsayers by Christians.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/91fe92dc-d87e-4e4c-a6e4-7559ab3a811b

    Documentation of the Beth Qustan Dialect of the Central Neo-Aramaic language, Turoyo
  • GARGARNAYE (NEO ARAMAIC) LIDIA NAPIORKOWSKA

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE NORTH-EASTERN NEO-ARAMAIC DIALECT CLUSTER OF GARGARNAYE
    This collection documents Gargarnaye, one of the North Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialects (generally known as the NENA dialects), a very diverse group of Aramaic dialects that were spoken until modern times in Northern Iraq, North West Iran and South Eastern Turkey by Christian and Jewish communities. These are among the last remaining living vestiges of the Aramaic language, which was one of the major languages of the region in antiquity.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/33e9d486-f58f-4278-b9da-d83e8904c9b5

    Documentation of the North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialect cluster of Gargarnaye
  • KOREAN SANG-HEE PARK

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): KOREAN
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8195c41b-81f0-4e4d-bcce-6a6775825ae6

  • TALYSHI GERARDO DE CARO

    TALYSHI DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION
    This documentation project describes Talyshi, a North-Western Iranian language spoken along the Caspian coastline on the border between Iran and Azerbaijan. The project focuses on the dialects spoken in Iran. Its completion comprises the following key points: 1. DOCUMENTATION & DESCRIPTION: a) expansion and revision of the annotated narrative corpus; b) further recording of narratives in obsolescent and undocumented dialects; c) elicitation of grammaticality judgments and elaboration of tests focused on argument marking and alignment variation. 2. LANGUAGE PROMOTION: a) organization of a talk/workshop on Talyshi with the assistance of the Institute for the National Encyclopaedia and the Circle of the Talysh in Tehran; b) finalization of the MOU between SOAS and ICHHTO; c) further collaboration with native speakers interested in producing language materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d740caf4-fa25-4851-b50b-4b6e121b7c22

    Talyshi documentation and description
  • GRECO MARIA FRANCESCA STAMULI

    GRECO DI CALABRIA
    Language death and lexical variation in Calabrian Greek
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5e0366bd-8781-416f-8c3b-e58631d43982

  • ANTIA WHISTLING LANGUAGE SOPHIE SALFFNER, ANDREW NEVINS

    THE ANTIA WHISTLING LANGUAGE: DOCUMENTING LANGUAGE USE AND LANGUAGE ACTIVISM
    The Antia Whistling Language is a Greek whistling language used by the people of Antia in southern Euboia, Greece, to communicate with one another in their mountainous village. The language is endangered because very few people still live in the remote village, and the language was not passed on to children outside the village. Members of the community have noticed this decline of language use and are now actively engaging in language maintenance. Together with whistlers of other languages, the Cultural Organisation of all Antia People organises international meetings, for example the First International Meeting for the Study and Preservation of Whistling Languages, Antia/Karystos, 23rd/24th Aug 2014. Whistlers also hold whistling classes in schools in neighbouring towns and islands to pass on the language to children.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/01d865cb-1fae-47b2-9928-40f9c4f3e93e

    The Antia Whistling Language: documenting language use and language activism
  • KABARDIAN AYLA APPLEBAUM BOZKURT

    DOCUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF KABARDIAN AS SPOKEN IN TURKEY
    Kabardian is a typologically rare and threatened Circassian (Northwest Caucasian) language spoken by approximately 647,000 people, primarily in Russia and Turkey. Although the largest concentration of Kabardian speakers is found in the Kabardino-Balkar republic of Russia, approximately one half of Kabardian speakers now reside in Turkey after a mass exodus from Russia in the 19th century. This deposit includes audio, text, images, ELA, and metadata files, of elicited word lists glossed in English and Turkish, children’s stories, Kabardian mythological stories (nart sagas), riddles, traditional recipes, conversations, and narratives.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/42aeb8d2-4fbe-4e7a-88a4-8feee51d36c2

    Documentation and Analysis of Kabardian as Spoken in Turkey
  • ZOK KATHERINE HODGSON

    A DOCUMENTATION OF THE ZOK LANGUAGE
    Zok is a form of Armenian that is so divergent that it has been classified as a separate language. It was originally spoken in Nakhijevan (present-day Azerbaijan). The last Armenians of Nakhijevan were displaced by conflict in 1988. There are thought to be less than 1,000 remaining speakers of this dialect. This project will produce an audiovisual corpus of texts, a grammar, including information from previously unrecorded subdialects, and vocabulary lists. An online presence will be created in collaboration with the community, and material may be contributed to existing resources on the history and culture of the Armenians of Nakhijevan.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a6066f5c-1961-4874-bd78-491c41de5f61

  • MINDERICO VERA FERREIRA

    DOCUMENTATION OF MINDERICO
    Minderico is an endangered language spoken in Minde and Mira de Aire (Portugal) by a community of 150 active speakers but only 24 are fluent speakers. In the community there are also approximately 1000 passive speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d8f6adb0-82cd-4c30-b2cc-7c1c5c7ab436

    Documentation of Minderico
  • TUNEN KOUMASSOL MIDINETTE ENDURENCE DISSAKE

    DOCUMENTING COMMUNICATIVE PRACTICES OF CUSTOMARY COURT PROCEEDINGS: THE CASE OF TUNEN NATIVE-SPEAKERS OF THE NDIKBIAKAT CANTON
    The aim of this project is to document the traditional communicative practices specific to customary court proceedings within the Banen community. Their language, Tunen, is a Narrow Bantu (A.44) spoken by close to 40,000 people in the Centre and Littoral Regions of Cameroon. Focus is put on customary court debates, deliberations, and judgement. Legal terms and customary law speech acts are highly endangered in this community due the lack of intergenerational transmission. Consequently, this documentation work is of utmost importance to safeguard, thanks to sound archiving, the ancestral practices peculiar to traditional courts in the Banen community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9689a290-d1da-43bb-a639-aa57d1e4c7e9

    Documenting communicative practices of customary court proceedings: The case of Tunen native-speakers of the Ndikbiakat Canton
  • MAKO JORGE EMILIO ROSéS LABRADA

    COLLABORATIVE DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF MAKO, A SáLIBAN LANGUAGE OF VENEZUELA
    Mako is a Saliban language of Venezuela with around 1,500 speakers. This deposit includes a collection of annotated ethnographic texts and a grammar of Mako that can serve as a starting point for both language maintenance in the community and for further linguistic research. The collection includes culturally-relevant video and audio recordings of spontaneous speech data, staged communicative events and elicitation sessions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6bed9c49-c2dd-446d-b692-53c24cfbc916

    Collaborative Documentation and Description of Mako, a Sáliban Language of Venezuela
  • EASTERN PENAN PETER SERCOMBE

    A DICTIONARY OF EASTERN PENAN
    The Penan language documentation project focuses on Eastern Penan. The Eastern Penan inhabit north eastern Sarawak (in East Malaysia) and the south of Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei). They number around 10,000 (Sellato and Sercombe 2007) and constitute a demographic and political minority in both Brunei and Malaysia. Until the early part of the 20th century, Eastern Penan were mainly hunter-gatherers, but most have now settled and become rice farmers (not always with success). They share a small number of cultural features with Western Penan but can otherwise certainly be considered a distinct ethnic group. For further details of the classification of Penan groups see Sellato and Sercombe (2007). Documentation includes word lists, stories, articles relating to Eastern Penan circumstances (especially, but not only, regarding language and language education). Gratitude is extended to all Eastern Penan, in particular those in the small settlement of Sukang in the southern part of Brunei, especially Luyah Anak Kaling who was unfailingly helpful in the face of questioning.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fa50cffc-1d49-4a55-ab86-84fe36ddccff

  • NKOROO BRUCE CONNELL

    DOCUMENTATION OF NKOROO [NKX]
    Nkoroo is an Eastern Ijoid language spoken in the town of Nkoroo in the eastern end of the Niger Delta in Nigeria. The Nkoroo documentation includes: phonetic/phonological structures of Nkoroo (segmental and tonal contrasts), grammatical paradigms, sentence types, videos of such activities as boat building and music making are included s well as a lexicon of approximately 1700 words. Transcribed texts are annotated and interlinearized.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/19ec53e0-8c3b-41e3-805b-3fd425b888c4

  • DUSUN EVA KERSHAW

    FOLKTALES AND INTERVIEWS IN BRUNEI – DUSUN
    The material comprises 50 hours of selections from folktales and interviews recorded on audiocassettes in Brunei between 1986-93. The respondents were all of the middle-aged to elderly generation as of that time (several are now deceased), speaking a “pure” form of their language, that is, the form in which they had previously narrated the folktales or which was current at the time of the historical incidents and social scene described in the interviews. As no member of the younger, Malay-educated generation was ever present (and the interviewer spoke only Dusun), there was no “modernising” adaptation of the language for their benefit. Every single recording is accompanied by a transcript.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2bf1949f-9266-42ef-b041-a65fa95caac9

  • LOKOYA JONATHAN MOODIE

    A PILOT STUDY ON THE DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOKOYA LANGUAGE
    The Lokoya language is spoken by around 12,000 people in South Sudan and is considered threatened due to language shift and population displacement. Very little documentation has been carried out on this language. This project will undertake initial documentation work with speakers living in Melbourne and in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya and will record a range of conversations, traditional stories and songs. It will investigate the current status of the language and examine the feasibility of carrying out a major documentation project for the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d8c082df-b2d1-4f11-a204-b43d49a2d50e

  • GBANZILI-BOLAKA ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, MARIE-FRANçOISE ROMBI

    RECORDINGS OF GBANZILI-BôLAKA: AN UBANGI LANGUAGE OF CONGO
    Gbanzili-Bolaka is an Ubangi language spoken across the border of the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of Congo by a community of fishermen established on both sides of the Ubangi river, between Kouago and Mobaye. The population of speakers was estimated to be about 1000 at the time of fieldwork in 1973; more recent estimates reach up to 20,000 speakers. Gbanzili and Bolaka (a.k.a. Gbanziri and Boraka) are two dialects of a single language with high mutual intelligibility. The recordings in this deposit represent 7 reels, totalling 6h 52’ of sound. The contents include: stories of people and animals; folktales; sung stories; myths; stories of Tule the cultural hero; historical narratives; ritual and secular songs; riddles.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4d39a6d1-e323-479b-bebe-8b2e4156b4f1

  • BAFIA ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, GLADYS GUARISMA

    RECORDINGS OF BAFIA: A BANTU LANGUAGE OF CAMEROON
    The documentation of Bafia was carried out by linguist Gladys Guarisma from CNRS-LaCiTO from 1967 to 1975, in the areas of Bafia, Kiki and Donenkeng (Cameroon). This archive features various types of recordings (folk stories; linguistic questionnaires, ...) in Bafia. The Bafia collection is part of LAVAFLOW: Legacy Audio Video Archival in Fourteen Languages of the World, which archived materials from tapes or cassettes from seven different retired researchers at LACITO. The materials pertain to 14 different endangered languages: Bafia, Vute, and Tikar in Cameroon (Guarisma); Kiamu in Kenya, Shimaore and Shingazidja in Mayotte, and Gbanzili in the Central African Republic (Rombi); Badaga in India (Pilot-Raichoor); Zenaga and Hassaniya in Mauritania (Taine-Cheikh); Yemeni Arabic in Yemen (Naïm); Volow in Vanuatu (Vienne); and Hamea and Xârâgurè in New Caledonia (Moyse-Faurie).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/690d1ec2-9ef6-4278-abb7-862e319bf43c

    Recordings of Bafia: A Bantu language of Cameroon
  • DRUM LANGUAGE IN IBIBIO BASSEY OKON

    DOCUMENTING DRUMS AND DRUM LANGUAGE IN IBIBIO TRADITIONAL CEREMONIES
    The Ibibios of southern Nigeria have drums like obodom ubong (royal drum), obodom enyong (the drum played on the tree top) obodom mbre (drum used by masquerade group) obodom usuan etop or obodom ikod (drum for message dissemination) and the skin drum among others. This deposit documents the endangered knowledge about drums and drum language among the Ibibio people. The use of drums and its language, though essential in most traditional ceremonies, is greatly endangered.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f6ee67fe-af44-4b52-82b1-1dd3406ae443

  • ARAPAHO ANDREW COWELL

    A CONVERSATIONAL DATABASE OF THE ARAPAHO LANGUAGE IN VIDEO FORMAT
    This project will create a video database of Arapaho conversational interaction, with extensive linguistic and cultural annotation. The database will be created using the ELAN platform, which is part of the DOBES project of the Max Planck Institute. A text-only version of the database will be created in an XML format, displayed on the world wide web via XSL. The XML version will be open access, while the video database will be deposited at SOAS and available to interested researchers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3bba11be-a5e2-47dd-bfe5-42f2ee9e0bf4

  • CAPPADOCIAN MARK JANSE

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF CAPPADOCIAN (ASIA MINOR GREEK)
    Cappadocian (also known as Asia Minor Greek) is a Greek-Turkish mixed language thought to have died in the 1960s until its rediscovery in 2005. According to our present knowledge, there are an estimated several hundreds of native speakers and possibly another several hundreds of semi-speakers living in three villages near Thessaloniki (Northern Greece) and Larissa (Central Greece). This collection provides, with the collaboration of local community members, an as comprehensive as possible documentation of present-day spoken Cappadocian, including digital recordings of every type of language usage, annotated transcriptions, a sociolinguistic survey and a comprehensive grammar and dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0de964f8-40fe-46ac-a170-7a6dfddbed03

  • MARDIN SIGN LANGUAGE ULRIKE ZESHAN

    SIGNING IN A ‘DEAF FAMILY’ – DOCUMENTATION OF THE MARDIN SIGN LANGUAGE, TURKEY
    Mardin Sign Language exists in a unique setting, a group of ca.40 members of an extended family with a high incidence of hereditary deafness over five generations. "Dilsiz" is the Turkish word for "deaf", and the sign language is used by both deaf and hearing family members. The language originated in the town of Mardin in south-eastern Turkey, but users of the language now live in Istanbul and Izmir. Mardin Sign Language is undocumented and on the brink of extinction under the influence of Turkish Sign Language, the language of the urban deaf community in Turkey. This deposit contains 30 hours of video recordings, with content specifically focusing on documentation of: narratives by the oldest sign language users about the history of deafness in this extended family; interviews with consultants about interactions within this small community; narratives about the way in which the sign language was used in its original location in Mardin and the way in which it is used now.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/30f642c1-5f7e-4053-9bdf-f4bfa0782323

  • HUPA AMY CAMPBELL, LINDSEY NEWBOLD

    EXPANDING THE DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF HUPA (ATHABASKAN)
    With fewer than five first-language speakers remaining, Hupa (Pacific Coast Athabaskan) is a critically endangered language traditionally spoken in Hoopa Valley in Northern California. Although Hupa morphophonology has been described, very little work has been done on syntax, semantics or discourse phenomena. Working with a fluent speaker, we document the Hupa language, providing a complete description of the language through a multimedia text corpus and an integrated description of clause structure and interclausal relationships.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/61d5f60a-5dfd-433b-9d24-2ebe8947aa57

  • LAZ RENé LACROIX

    PAN-DIALECTAL DOCUMENTATION OF LAZ
    Laz is a highly endangered South Caucasian (Kartvelian) language mainly spoken in North-East Turkey. The collection contains 230 hours of audio and HD video recordings in the four dialects of Laz, gathered over a period of 11 months in 2011 from more than 360 speakers. The collection also includes 560 photographs taken during the recording sessions and some transcriptions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/31ca365a-b3dd-4c1c-ae33-daf3fe8fd90a

    Pan-dialectal documentation of Laz
  • SPANISH IRAIDE IBARRETXE, ANDREA ARIñO BIZARRO

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): SPANISH
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2f493d40-348f-4961-8453-e860a925e51d

  • AINU ANNA BUGAEVA

    AN AINU TALKING DICTIONARY
    Based on legacy materials and new recordings of the last speakers of the Saru dialect of Ainu, this collection includes two corpora with time-aligned transcriptions, translations and annotations, including various genres of folktales.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f4f896b5-db0e-458b-9edd-603d0555eec9

    An Ainu Talking Dictionary
  • ARCHI MARINA CHUMAKINA, DUNSTAN BROWN

    DICTIONARY OF ARCHI: ARCHI-RUSSIAN-ENGLISH
    Archi is a highly endangered language spoken in one village, Archib, of a remote mountainous region in Daghestan. Geographically, Archi’s neighbouring languages are Avar and Lak. Speakers view Archi as a source of pride, as being “the most complex language in Daghestan”. Archi is a first language for all of the speakers, and there are none who speak Archi as a second language (intermarriages are extremely rare and communication with neighbours is through one of the languages of external communication - Russian, Anar or Lak. This deposit includes an Archi-Russian-English dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e1c4b3ba-2803-4b6c-8013-a8af2addaf0c

    Dictionary of Archi: Archi-Russian-English
  • ARAPAHO LISA CONATHAN

    ARAPAHO TEXT CORPUS
    Arapaho is one of a group of Algonquian languages spoken on the Great Plains, on the eastern seaboard, northwest and upper midwest of the US, and in eastern Canada in an area separate from the main speech area. This collection includes an English-Arapaho dictionary with glosses, morphological analysis, etymology (including Proto-Algonquian and Proto-Algic roots), and references to a text corpus.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/dce27ecd-8e14-4afc-87cc-9d14f2af3e31

    Arapaho text corpus
  • CHAMALAL KRISTIAN RONCERO

    AN AUDIO-VISUAL DOCUMENTATION OF CHAMALAL, A LANGUAGE OF DAGESTAN (RUSSIA)
    Chamalal (Nakh-Dagestanian, Andic) is an unwritten language spoken in the mountains between Chechnya and Dagestan (Russian Caucasus). This project will collect an audiovisual corpus of texts representing different speech genres and ethnographic knowledge with their respective transcriptions and translations. Linguistic descriptions will be published as a result, and literacy materials produced. The project will also emphasise capacity building of Chamalal speakers. They will be trained to carry out some of the recordings, the transcriptions of the texts, and creating literacy resources. In addition, language use will be promoted among the younger generations through initiatives in social media platforms.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/42472776-6416-4d6d-aa54-1059424f14d2

  • SARU DIALECT OF AINU ANNA BUGAEVA, HIROSHI NAKAGAWA

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE SARU DIALECT OF AINU
    This collection includes documentation material on the Saru dialect of Ainu, a language which is nearly extinct at present. The collection includes a corpus of previously recorded and unpublished material of Mrs. Kimi Kimura (1900-1988) recorded by Hiroshi Nakagawa in 1977 to 1983 and a corpus of newly collected audio materials with time-aligned transcriptions, multi-tier annotations, as well as translations of transcripts into English and Japanese, collected by Anna Bugaeva between 2007-2009.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/434ad04b-3673-4881-a3de-98c74e1144c5

    Documentation of the Saru dialect of Ainu
  • LAKOTA JURGITA SALTANAVICIUTE

    PRESERVATION OF LAKOTA LANGUAGE: TRANSLATION OF SONGS AND SPEECHES
    The Lakota language is an endangered Native American language still spoken in North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Montana, and Minnesota. At the end of the twentieth century Lakota was spoken by 6,000 people, however, both statistic and field observations show a rapid decrease in the numbers of speakers. The project is a collaborative effort between Lakota Studies faculty at Sinte Gleska University and a linguistic anthropologist at the University of Oklahoma. The goals of the project are to transcribe, translate, and interpret Lakota songs and speeches from three collections which were recorded in the first half of the twentieth century. This project is the first in a sequence of projects at Sinte Gleska University to preserve the Lakota language which will result in publications of Lakota language resources and cultural studies. Visit http://www.sitekreator.com/jurga/projects.html for further information.

  • BASQUE IRAIDE IBARRETXE

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): BASQUE
    This deposit contains audio and video recordings collected from basque language speakers as part of the Causality Across Languages Project; in particular two subprojects: Language & Cognition subproject (IV) and Discourse Representation subproject (II). CAL brings together an international team of researchers to investigate how speakers of different languages categorize causal chains for the purposes of describing them. It comprises four subprojects. The first of these is dedicated to the representation of causal relations in narrative discourses, with emphasis on universals and variation in underspecification and implicitness. The second subproject probes quantitatively and typologically the often hypothesized isomorphism between semantic and morphosyntactic complexity in verbal representations of causal chains. A third subproject investigates the universality of constraints on form-to-meaning mapping in descriptions of causal chains. The fourth and final subproject targets the cognitive representation of causality, searching for aspects of culture-specificity and possible linguistic reflexes.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/da0198d8-4238-40df-a102-9e58905e7c18

  • CHIRAG DMITRY GANENKOV

    CHIRAG DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    The project will document Chirag, an endangered language from the Dargwa branch of the East Caucasian (Nakh-Daghestanian) family, spoken in Daghestan, Russia (2100-2400 speakers). The main goal of the project is to collect a rich corpus of audio/video data from both traditional narratives and everyday communication. I propose to record about 110 hours of Chirag (spontaneous speech, lexical and grammatical elicitation), of which at least 25 hours of spontaneous speech will be transcribed, morphologically analyzed and translated to produce an annotated corpus of Chirag available on the internet.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/caea1eef-1080-48f5-9c66-0fca59abecab

  • CHECHEN ZARINA MOLOCHIEVA

    DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF CHECHEN INCLUDING THE CHEBERLOI DIALECT
    Chechen is a Northeast Caucasian (aka Nakh-Dagestanian) language with several dialectal variants: the lowland dialect (Ploskostnoi), Itumkala, Melxin, Kistin, Cheberloi, Akki, and Galanchozh dialect. Chechen is spoken by approx. 1,350,000 speakers. Most speakers who are younger than 70 years old are bilingual (Chechen-Russian). The data represented in this project was collected from the elderly speakers exclusively. The goal of the project was to collect data from elderly speakers who are monolingual speakers of Chechen of different varieties. This project focuses on the Chechen folklore, culture-specific texts, and traditional activities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f2fdca91-9f22-4abe-b384-489508eb8f52

    Documentation and grammatical description of Chechen including the Cheberloi dialect
  • KIKSHT NARIYO KONO

    NATURAL DISCOURSE OF THE WARM SPRINGS LAST SPEAKER OF KIKSHT
    Kiksht is a Chinookan language with only two remaining speakers. The acknowledged most fluent speaker, Gladys Thompson, is a 92-year-old woman residing on the Warm Spring Reservation in Oregon. A second fully competent speaker, Nelson Moses, an elder male, resides on the Yakima Reservation of Washington State. This deposit comprises over 100 audio and video files, with genres including narration, translation, elicitation and pedagogical materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/be58bd96-0354-492e-9aef-42b4c5f29f76

  • ISTRO-ROMANIAN ZVJEZDANA VRZIC

    CORPUS TITLE DOCUMENTATION OF THE VLASHKI/ZHEYANSKI LANGUAGE (‘RUO’)
    The collection includes most of the audio/video, descriptive and community-oriented material in two dialects of the Vlashki/Zheyanski language that was collected and/or produced between 2007 and 2017. Most of the audio/video recordings consist of narratives, guided conversations and procedural discourse depicting elements of local lifestyle and history. The annotated audio/video corpus represents speech of a wide range of speakers living in Croatia, but also a variety of descriptive, academic and community-oriented materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/51acb2f8-968d-4d05-ad15-0d9134324ce8

    Corpus Title Documentation of the Vlashki/Zheyanski language (‘ruo’)
  • YAKIMA SAHAPTIN JOANA JANSEN

    YAKIMA LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMAR
    This collection contains materials from the Yakima Language Documentation and Grammar Project. Yakima (or Yakama) Sahaptin is a Penutian language spoken in and around the Yakama Indian reservation in central Washington State, USA. It is now close to extinct; only a handful of fluent speakers remain, although there is growing interest in teaching and preserving the language. There is a variety of video and audio recordings covering different genres, with interlinear transcriptions. Also included are teaching materials to aid teachers and learners.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cbea8d0f-d899-4551-a509-e1e017aeca77

  • OIRAT, KALMYK ELENA INDJIEVA

    KALMYK/OIRAT; DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHING MATERIALS FOR KALMYK NATIONAL SCHOOLS; COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF KALMYK AND OIRAT
    The language of Oirat belongs to the Western branch of the Mongolic languages group, Kalmyk on the other side is often treated as an Oirat dialect. The files labelled as Included in PhD thesis contributed to Indjieva’s thesis on the intonational structure of the Oirat language, the rest are raw audio and video files from Indjieva’s fieldwork trips. Among these, we can find an extensive collection of folktales and procedural texts concerning daily activities, as well as a few ritual practices and conversations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f15ebe3e-b208-4400-bc4c-d6afa270e6f7

    Kalmyk/Oirat; Development of teaching materials for Kalmyk national schools; Comparative studies of Kalmyk and Oirat
  • PASSAMAQUODDY-MALISEET CONOR QUINN

    DOCUMENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GENRES OF PASSAMAQUODDY-MALISEET LINGUISTIC PRACTICE
    This collection contains materials on under-represented genres of speech, particularly conversation, in Passamaquoddy-Maliseet, an Eastern Algonquian language with approximately 500 speakers. These were gathered in and around several communities along the northern border of Maine (USA) and Canada over a period of two years. The collection contains sets of annotated transcriptions of audio recordings, designed to be suitable as base material for second-language instruction, as well as for a broad range of analytical work.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/17b50456-cb68-454d-8cde-c91570681bb9

  • HUNGARIAN KATALIN BALOGH

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): HUNGARIAN
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/7e689ae5-6a92-4de6-a112-4fc5d5d553c5

  • MANDAIC QAIS AL SAADI

    DOCUMENTATION OF FORMAL AND SPOKEN MANDAIC
    The Nhura dictionary and Zazai text were created independently by myself, Dr. Qais Al Saaidi, a Mandaean and native speaker of Mandaic. These projects were not funded by any sponsor. The content of the Nhura Dictionary depends on the Mandaic vocabularies from Mandaean literature, as well as benefiting from the efforts of Theodor Nöldke, Mark Lidzbarski, and Lady Drower in their published translation from Mandaic into German and English. The dictionary covers as many Mandaean vocabularies as possible. It is not limited to a technical language, but rather to general words and terms. The words are from the formal language and not from neo-Mandaic.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/70607394-af7c-4fe2-af53-fd40fd7gdc56

    Documentation of formal and spoken Mandaic
  • URIANKHAI TSENDEE YUNGER

    DOCUMENTING THE MONGOL URIANKHAI DIALECT AND CULTURE OF MONGOLIA
    Uriankhai is a one of endangered Oirat language spoken in vast, but sparsely populated regions in Uvs, Khovd and Khuvsgul province of Mongolia. Estimates are that only small minority among the 26664 Uriankhai still speak the language, which is equal to only one percent of population of Mongolia. Due to the dominance of Kazak and Tuvan language in Bayan-Ulgii province, Khalkha language in Khovd province and Darkhad and Khalkha languages in Khuvsgul province Uriankhai of Oirat are disappearing rapidly. The documentation effort will focus on the language as occurring in a number of different culturally important situation types of nomadic life, also folk songs, poem, eulogy and fairy tales and thus capture those parts of Uriankhai language and culture that are disappearing most rapidly.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1ccac27f-619f-4ec4-b831-b73317786cac

    Documenting the Mongol Uriankhai dialect and culture of Mongolia
  • GUERNESIAIS JAN MARQUIS, JULIA SALLABANK

    DOCUMENTATION OF GUERNESIAIS, THE INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE OF GUERNSEY, CHANNEL ISLANDS
    There are under 200 (mainly elderly) fluent speakers of Guernesiais (Guernésiais, Dgernesiais, Giernesiei), the indigenous language of Guernsey, Channel Islands (Latitude: 49°26'N, Longitude: 2°35'W). Guernesiais shares the ISO-639 code ‘nrf’ with Jèrriais (Jersey); both are varieties of Norman. A SOAS field trip in 2009 recorded 50+ hours of native speakers, several in their 90’s. A further 40 hours have been recorded by Yan Marquis, including the related variety Serquiais (Sark), thought to have under 10 speakers. Approx. 10% has been transcribed.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/55fb227a-7f71-4e27-a6ee-a34a2ec8a912

    Documentation of Guernesiais, the indigenous language of Guernsey, Channel Islands
  • DURVUD, OIRAT TSENDEE YUNGER

    DOCUMENTING THE DURVUD DIALECT OF OIRAT IN WESTERN MONGOLIA
    This collection documents the Durvud dialect of Oirat, a variety spoken in vast but sparsely populated regions in western Mongolia such as Uvs, Khovd, and Bayan-Olgii. Due to the increasing dominance of Khalkha, Durvud and other varieties of Oirat are disappearing rapidly, and only a small minority among the 66706 ethnic Durvuds still speak the language. The documentation effort focuses on the language as occurring in a number of different culturally important situation types of nomadic life and thus capture those parts of Durvud language culture that are disappearing most rapidly.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b417a356-025b-446b-8d5c-e6dfcb2e9604

    Documenting the Durvud dialect of Oirat in Western Mongolia
  • IBIBIO ENO-ABASI URUA

    DOCUMENTATION OF DIRGE SONGS AMONG THE URUAN PEOPLE IN NIGERIA
    This collection documents the dirge, a ritual funeral eulogy performed by elderly women and professionals at the death of a family or community member, and also during a catastrophic event, as practised among the Uruan people of Nigeria. Traditionally used at funerals, the dirge is rarely practised these days because of a shift to Western funeral customs and has become a highly endangered traditional art form. Through observations, audiovisual recordings and interviews, the depositors have built, analysed and archived a collection on the dirge in Uruan, which is accessible to both the language community and academic researchers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3791a607-6614-4dfe-bf8d-3b9ae14d1ce6

  • KIONG EYO MENSAH

    DOCUMENTING LIBATION RITUALS IN KIONG, SOUTH-EASTERN NIGERIA
    The project sets out to document the language of libation rituals in Kiong, a language with less than 100 speakers in Akamkpa and Odukpani local government areas of Cross River State, Nigeria. The project focuses on the Okoyong community in Odukpani where libation ritual is still practiced as a significant form of sacred communication that is quitessential to their culture and spirituality but which is daily put out of prominence and active use. The project aims to interview, record, transcribe and annotate audio and video materials to produce archival data that will benefit the Kiong community and the enlarged scientific community.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/5e5de149-065e-424d-bae8-c643479aa738

    Documenting libation rituals in Kiong, South-Eastern Nigeria
  • ONGOTA GRAZIANO SAVA

    DOCUMENTATION OF ONGOTA
    Ongota is the traditional language of a hunter-gatherer community in Ethiopia. It is being abandoned in favour of neighbouring Ts’amakko (Cushitic) and is only spoken by Ongota elders. The language defies classification and is considered an isolate. Investigating the origins of Ongota and its community will provide important insight into African linguistic diversity and history. This collection includes video and audio recordings of the language, a grammar, and an Ongota-Ts’amakko dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/37b2c3f1-437d-4913-accb-d1a87a5f479e

  • ZARGULLA AZEB AMHA

    DOCUMENTATION OF HOUSE CONSTRUCTION AND TERRACE FARMING IN ZARGULLA, AN ENDANGERED OMOTIC LANGUAGE
    Zargulla (zay) is an endangered Omotic language spoken by c.a. 8000 speakers in south-west Ethiopia (62.60N 37.19E). Several Zargulla villages are characterized by terrace-farming and clusters of houses commemorating the dead in the higher parts of valleys, and residential areas in foothills and plateaus. The project will produce a linguistic and ethnographic documentation of this parallel and interactive spatial complex of farming and dwelling, which is endangered by socio-cultural changes. Its primary goal is to produce a multi-media digital corpus and a thematic dictionary on house-construction and terrace-farming, and, using these outputs, to study the grammar of space in Zargulla.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/196bdd35-3bdb-49aa-bd39-e1741ae69f95

    Documentation of house construction and terrace farming in Zargulla, an endangered Omotic language
  • YE'KWANA NATALIA CACERES

    DOCUMENTATION OF YE’KWANA IN THE EREBATO RIVER IN VENEZUELA
    Ye’kwana, also known as De’kwana, Maquiritare and Mayongong, is part of the second largest language family of South America, the Cariban family. According to one of the most recent and reliable genetic classification, Ye’kwana is part of the central branch of the family with four other living languages: Wayana, Mapoyo and Yawarana (all spoken in Venezuela) and Apalai (spoken in Brazil) (Kaufman 1994). This collection contains 43 video, 47 audio, 11 ELAN, and over 60 transcriptions and other documentation carried out in two Ye’kwana villages of the Caura Basin in Venezuela: Anadekenya (Boca de Piña) and Ijuwutunya (Santa María de Erebato).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b8ba286e-3803-4a45-9c9e-cdf946592709

    Documentation of Ye’kwana in the Erebato river in Venezuela
  • KOEGU MOGES YIGEZU

    PILOT PROJECT FOR KOEGU, A HIGHLY ENDANGERED LANGUAGE OF THE LOWER OMO VALLEY, SOUTH WESTERN ETHIOPIA
    This collection contains materials on Koegu, a highly endangered language spoken by an estimated 200 people in south-western Ethiopia, especially near the Omo river west bank and the village of Kuchur. Koegu has been influenced heavily by the Kara language (an Omotic language spoken nearby) and is therefore not only under threat from negative attitudes, but also outside influences. This collection contains a survey of the last surviving speakers of Koegu who live amongst the Kara, Bume, Mursi and Bodi communities as well as recordings of people, events and ceremonies. Since the Koegu are amongst the last surviving hunter-gatherers in the region, this documentation will contribute to the preservation of the cultural heritage of the Koegu.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/009e8975-3b5a-4267-97a7-cf42812ec24e

    Pilot Project for Koegu, a highly endangered language of the Lower Omo Valley, South Western Ethiopia
  • EFFUTU NANA AGYEMAN

    DOCUMENTATION OF EFFUTU
    Items of this deposit include audio recordings, video recordings, still photos and texts from fieldwork of a language documentation project of Simpa or Efutu, spoken in a fishing community in Winneba in the central region of Ghana. Some of the videos come with their accompanying audio version (whereas others are video only or audio only). Some of the audios come with an accompanying transcription in ELAN. Types of data in the video and audio recordings may be categorised into (i) interviews, (ii) prompted narratives (a form of staged events), (iii) elicitations, and (iv) natural (speech) events or observed communicative events (Lupke 2009) or observable linguistic behaviour (Himmelmann 2006). Most of the video recordings of naturally occurring events contain fishing activities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c0f4f436-ff3f-47fc-8822-d8cec006cff1

    Documentation of Effutu
  • KARI’NJA RAQUEL YAMADA

    KARI’NJA DICTIONARY AND VIDEO DOCUMENTATION
    Kari’nya is an endangered laguage spoken in Suriname. This collection on the Aretyry dialect of Kari’nja is based on a long-standing collaboration between a linguist and community members and serves as a first step toward meeting these needs. The collection includes three short films documenting the Aretyry dialect of Kari’nja as well as cultural practices. The films as well as their accompanying narrations are transcribed, translated, and subtitled. In addition, the collection includes a 3,000 entry Kari’nja-Dutch-English dictionary with Sranan Tongo word list.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/322e575f-2eab-4d6b-854d-e7224ee6bec9

  • BATI EMMANUEL NGUE UM

    A DOCUMENTATION OF BATI LANGUAGE AND ORAL TRADITIONS
    The documentation of Bati language and oral traditions aims at creating a repository of language and cultural data representative of the five varieties spoken in the Bati Canton, in the Littoral region of Cameroon. Number of Bati speakers is estimated at 800. The resulting corpus will lay the empirical ground for cross-dialectal studies in linguistics and others fields in the humanities such as anthropology, which will better inform on the bi-vectorial dynamics of Bati language and identity, torn as they are, between the Mbam and the Basaa groups respectively.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d1d8e68a-9251-4930-bf3a-e81edf007e39

    A documentation of Bati language and oral traditions
  • PIAROA JORGE EMILIO ROSéS LABRADA

    COLLABORATIVE DOCUMENTATION OF PIAROA, A LANGUAGE OF THE VENEZUELAN AMAZON
    This project focuses on the documentation of Piaroa, an indigenous language spoken in the Venezuelan Amazon, and serves to support ongoing community efforts towards preserving TEK and specialized speech genres. The project will result in a documentary corpus with audio and video recordings of culturally relevant communicative events and a collection of texts, both with potential to be mobilized in pedagogical materials creation. In addition to shedding light on aspects of the human language capacity, another important contribution of the project is the experience gained in working collaboratively with a native community on language documentation and preservation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b68d7b6d-5d90-47ff-a82c-54172ea342f9

    Collaborative documentation of Piaroa, a language of the Venezuelan Amazon
  • CAMEROON SIGN LANGUAGE, EXTREME NORTH CAMEROON SIGN LANGUAGE SAM LUTALO-KIINGI

    DOCUMENTATION OF EXTREME NORTH CAMEROON SIGN LANGUAGE AND CAMEROON SIGN LANGUAGE
    Project Summary: This project aims to document and compare two languages: the rural sign language referred to here as Extreme North Cameroon Sign Language (ExNorthCamSL), which is used in and around the town of Maroua, and Cameroon Sign Language (CamSL) which is used in the rest of the country (Central, Littoral, North-West, South-West, and West regions). CamSL has been influenced by American Sign Language (ASL) and Langue des Signes Française (LSF, or French Sign Language) through educators and missionaries. The linguistics of both sign languages is undocumented (De Clerck, 2011). Approximately 150 signers use ExNorthCamSL, while an estimated 4,500 use CamSL.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f4a51b02-cb4e-4294-83c7-7f85c9c5fd75

  • TIKAR ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, GLADYS GUARISMA

    RECORDINGS OF TIKAR: A SOUTH BANTOID LANGUAGE OF NIGER-CONGO
    Seven different researchers at LACITO, now retired, have in the course of their careers made precious field recordings, preserved only as tapes or cassettes. These pertain to 14 different endangered languages: Bafia, Vute, and Tikar in Cameroon (Guarisma); Kiamu in Kenya, Shimaore and Shingazidja in Mayotte, and Gbanzili in the Central African Republic (Rombi); Badaga in India (Pilot-Raichoor); Zenaga and Hassaniya in Mauritania (Taine-Cheikh); Yemeni Arabic in Yemen (Naïm); Volow in Vanuatu (Vienne); and Hamea and Xârâgurè in New Caledonia (Moyse-Faurie). This project will allow these audio recordings to be digitized, archived, and made accessible to the public.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/65d23fbd-5453-42d8-a3af-ae340ec37388

    Recordings of Tikar: A South Bantoid language of Niger-Congo
  • OUBI JENNY JAFFE

    A DOCUMENTATION OF OUBI
    The deposit is a result of a documentation of the Oubi language as spoken in Côte d'Ivoire by native speakers. The project was undertaken as an unpaid effort by a non-linguist with the help of her native speaker colleagues at the Tai Chimpanzee Project. The deposited data mainly consists of word lists, basic grammar and life history of the oldest male speaker of Oubi.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/70607394-af7c-4fe2-ag55-fd41f7dgdi58

    A documentation of Oubi
  • BABA 1 ANNE VILAIN

    DOCUMENTATION OF BABA'1, A BANTU LANGUAGE FROM THE GRASSFIELDS OF CAMEROON
    Baba'1 is a non-written language spoken by a community of people in the village of Baba'1, in the Ndop plain, North West province of Cameroon. The materials in this collection include: audio and video recordings of varied texts and situations, including conversations and traditional ceremonies; information about socio-cultural practices, including mourning, twins, kinship and family relationships; an investigation of cultural transmission to children, including whether, how and when mothers tell stories to their babies, the ontogeny of telling and counting, including finger-telling and telling stories involving a precursor of finger-counting; time-aligned IPA transcription, annotation and translation into English; and a lexicon.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/08cb008b-a409-4f58-b697-2600a2488360

  • ST'áT'IMCETS (LOWER DIALECT) KIMARY SHAHIN

    LOWER ST’áT’IMCETS DOCUMENTATION
    This collection includes documentation material of Lower St’át’imcets, a Salish language of southwest Interior British Columbia, Canada. The collection includes digital video and audio recordings, a Lower St’at’imcets text collection, grammar and lexicon. It also includes metadata about the data and the documentation process Documentation was conducted in collaboration with the Lower Stl’atl’imx community, who together with researchers at the Simon Fraser University were trained in fieldwork methods.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b0597353-a2dc-4b7f-a6ba-e63d137343e0

    Lower St’át’imcets Documentation
  • TUHAN ELISABETTA RAGAGNIN

    A PRELIMINARY ARCHIVE OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL MATERIAL FROM THE TUHAN PEOPLE OF NORTHERN MONGOLIA
    Tuhan, a Sayan Turkic language, is spoken in the Tsagaan Uur county of East Khovsgol aimag in northern Mongolia. The collection includes an audiovisual corpus of mixed genres with data from the last speakers of Tuhan, collected by Elisabetta Ragagnin and provided with metadata. The pictures showcased in this deposit page show three Tuhan speakers, Dayanjalba, Baasanjav and Gombosurun, in 2014, and Dayanjalba and Elisabetta (the principal investigator) in Tsagaan Uur in 2017.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8e99c209-fc34-4463-8844-ecaeb6f4e490

    A preliminary archive of language and cultural material from the Tuhan people of northern Mongolia
  • KWAK’WALA DAISY ROSENBLUM

    MULTIMODAL DOCUMENTATION OF INTERACTIVE SPEECH IN KWAK’WALA
    The Kwakwake’wakw speak Kwak’wala, a Northern Wakashan language spoken on the Northeast coast of Vancouver Island and the surrounding area. While the language is endangered, community motivation to maintain and revitalize the language is high.This collection is the outcome of a language document project on three dialects of Kwak’wala speech in as many contexts as possible, among as many different participants as possible, using audio, video, still images, and time-aligned annotated transcription. By focusing on spontaneous interactive speech, we contribute to the corpus of documentation begun by Franz Boas and George Hunt in the early 20th century. It is hoped this collection will contribute to language revitalization efforts and scholarly linguistic research.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4337c5d9-24d9-4ef5-9aea-6a5b4b71ba3c

  • TSUUT'INA CHRISTOPHER COX

    DOCUMENTING CONVERSATIONS IN TSUUT’INA
    The project will provide an essential record of conversations in the highly endangered northern Dene language Tsuut'ina (srs) that will feature audio and video recordings of 8 hours of conversations with time-aligned textual documentation. We will record approximately half of the 30 fluent speakers of Tsuut'ina, who will self-represent their languages and contemporary culture through their choices of conversational topics. This documentation will facilitate analysis of conversational structure, the conversational construction of place and time, comparisons between Dene languages, and language learning by community members.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/765d9441-c7f6-4cbe-a97b-7252337e8189

    Documenting Conversations in Tsuut’ina
  • ULCHA, NEGIDAL, KUR-URMI ELENA KALININA, VALENTIN GOUSSEV, SVETLANA TOLDOVA

    DOCUMENTATION OF ENDANGERED TUNGUSIC LANGUAGES OF KHABAROVSKIJ KRAJ
    The collection aims to provide the fullest possible documentation of three Tungusic languages: Negidal, Kur-Urmi and Ulcha, which are spoken in the Khabarovskij Kraj region of Russia, in the Amur River basin. The main objectives of the project were: 1) recording an extensive text corpus in Kur-Urmi, Negidal and Ulcha; 2) transcribing, analyzing and annotating the recorded texts; 3) recording sound files from older hand-written recordings; 4) attempts at collecting, transcribing and translating some existing archived texts in Negidal and possibly Kur-Urmi; 5) providing databases of vocabulary sound files to go with the text corpora (about 2500 entries).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6946bc41-de02-4fd9-87c3-45fcf82fe677

    Documentation of endangered Tungusic languages of Khabarovskij Kraj
  • GERMAN LARA VANESSA MöLLMANN

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): GERMAN
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f2f4e8fb-4788-4d15-86f1-86c70b15b8b2

  • NEGIDAL BRIGITTE PAKENDORF, NATALIA ARALOVA

    DOCUMENTATION OF NEGIDAL, A NEARLY EXTINCT NORTHERN TUNGUSIC LANGUAGE OF THE LOWER AMUR
    This project focuses on the documentation of Negidal, a moribund Northern Tungusic language spoken on the Amgun' and Lower Amur rivers. It comprises two dialects, Upper and Lower Negidal, of which the Upper dialect is spoken by only a handful of women and the Lower dialect is no longer actively spoken. We have constructed an extensive collection of annotated oral recordings from the Upper dialect. The bulk of these were made by a team of Russian linguists, to which we have added some recordings of more speakers, procedural texts, and legacy materials of speakers who passed away in the 1990s.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b644db81-725c-4031-935c-f33c763df152

    Documentation of Negidal, a nearly extinct Northern Tungusic language of the Lower Amur
  • TOFA ARZHAANA SYURYUN

    DOCUMENTATION AND REVITALIZATION OF TOFA: FIELDWORK WITH THE LAST SPEAKERS
    The project is devoted to the the grant Tofa, a critically endangered South Siberian Turkic language spoken in three remote villages on the eastern Sayan mountains: Alygdzher, Nerha and Verkhnyaya Gutara, Nizhneudinsk region of Irkutsk Oblast. There are only 5 full speakers of Tofa and approximately 10 rememberers. The aim of the project is to document as much data as possible to create a corpus of Tofa language with the last speakers who are over 70 and develop an audio phrasebook and audio dictionary for the community to maintain their language and prevent the language loss.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ab5fbfe4-40d3-479e-89f5-2418f0a426bc

    Documentation and revitalization of Tofa: fieldwork with the last speakers
  • HAISLA, HENAAKSIALA EMMON BACH

    DOCUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF HAISLA AND HENAAKSIALA (NORTH WAKASHAN) OF KITAMAAT VILLAGE, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    The primary purpose of the project underlying this collection was to gather and analyse new materials on Haisla and Henaaksiala, North Wakashan language varieties (dialects) of Kitamaat village, British Columbia. The only remaining fluent speakers of Haisla are in their sixties and above, probably considerably fewer than 100 individuals. Children no longer learn the language at home, although there have been continuing efforts by the community to retain and strengthen knowledge of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e1e91cf3-e871-4e3f-a3b6-d638aa3dfeda

  • TELEUT ANDREY FILCHENKO, VALERIA LEMSKAYA

    COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION AND ARCHIVING OF TELEUT
    Documenting Bachat Teleut, a critically endangered Turkic language native to South-Western Siberia in Russia, with descriptive, comparative, typological and areal studies, as well as analysis of the degree of language endangerment, the language’s functional spheres and the sociolinguistic makeup of the communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/816e5979-037d-4d99-9d1e-b1451d824c1e

    Comprehensive documentation and archiving of Teleut
  • TELEUT ANDREY FILCHENKO

    DOCUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE ENDANGERED TELEUT LANGUAGE, SPOKEN IN SOUTH-WEST SIBERIA, RUSSIA
    The project is aimed at field documentation, creation of an electronic lexicon and interlinearized/translated text corpus, and preliminary analysis of the endangered Bachatsky Teleut language, spoken in south-western Siberia in Russia. The number of proficient native speakers in Kemerovo region is reported to be approx. 100. Mostly they are people over 50 years old. The additional goal is to perform a more precise survey of the real number of proficient and semi-speakers left, and the degree of language endangerment (native tongue functional sphere and socio-linguistic makeup of the language community).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f7071289-c709-4d4e-a1d5-986cc33faa33

    Documentation and Analysis of the Endangered Teleut Language, Spoken in south-west Siberia, Russia
  • GITSKAN TYLER PETERSON

    SEEING VOICES: DOCUMENTING THE GITSKAN NARRATIVE
    Gitksan is spoken in an number of communities along the Skeena river valley. This collection contains recordings from speakers in Kispiox, Gitanmaax (Hazelton), Kitsegukla, Kitwanga, Sik-e-Dakh (Glen Vowell), as well as two speakers living in Vancouver, BC. The core of this collection is a body of video, audio, text and photographic documents thematically centered on explanations of Gitksan cultural practices, personal anecdotes, and reflections on modern life. It also contains elicitation sessions investigating grammatical evidentiality and modality (reported in Peterson 2010).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d8d175ce-e5ab-4f2c-8257-b28adf9349f7

    Seeing Voices: Documenting the Gitskan Narrative
  • RUSSIAN ANASTASIA STEPANOVA

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): RUSSIAN
    This deposit contains audio and video recordings of twelve Russian speakers conducting the Causality Across Languages discourse task. The task involved showing participants a series of short video clips to elicit event descriptions (e.g., a woman breaking an egg). Each session in the deposit corresponds with one participant. Sessions contain a compressed video recording of the participant doing the task and a corresponding WAV file. This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4c83ca37-e945-40d3-b931-4482fe955395

  • EVEN ERICH KASTEN

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE EVEN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN KAMCHATKA
    From 2000 until 2014, Erich Kasten and his local research partners had recorded Koryak, Even and Itelmen texts in Kamchatka. These were meant at the outset to investigate anthropological research questions and, at the given time, without the purpose to create a well-structured language repository. Over the years however, the text corpus has aggregated up to 119 hours local language recordings on video tapes. With this project the documented precious and often unique language data will be made discoverable and accessible for research as well as for community use - with positive effects for the perservation of the given endangered languages on Kamchatka.
     
    Access Collection here:
    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6a876738-cfc3-4c0e-9ef9-2f9c00e15e028

    Documentation of the Even language and culture in Kamchatka
  • CHUVASH TATIANA NIKITINA

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES (CAL): CHUVASH
    This collection is part of the Causality Across Languages (CAL) project. CAL is an NSF-funded Linguistics project that investigates the representation of causality across 29 languages belonging to 26 language families and spoken on six continents. Four sub-projects explore the following topics and questions: The semantic typology of causality: how are causal chains semantically categorized across languages for the purposes of linguistic encoding? The representation of causality in discourse: how are causal chains represented in narratives across languages? Causality at the syntax-semantics interface: how much variation is there across languages in form-to-meaning mapping in the representation of causal chains? Causality in language and cognition: how are causal chains cognitively categorized across culturesand what role does language play in this variation?
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9bc99b40-895a-44b8-ad5d-bf267d59959c

  • ITELMEN ERICH KASTEN

    ITELMEN COLLECTION
    This collection contains seven spoken and fully annotated texts of some of the last first language Itelmen speakers that still could be recorded in the late 1990s. In another step, Itelmen word and phrase lists and more contextual information that had been recorded in Russian will be added to this collection.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6cb09c0d-ca1e-41cf-a20d-4bd159a8b353

    Itelmen Collection
  • ALEUT ALICE TAFF

    ALEUT CONVERSATION CORPUS
    The Aleut language, or Unangam Tunuu, indigenous to the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, Alaska, USA, is a branch of the Eskimo-Aleut language family. This deposit consists of around 250 audio and video recordings of Aleut speakers with transcriptions and English translations, resulting from fieldwork conducted between November 2003 and March 2006. The principle genre is spontaneous conversation between fluent speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ba0cd7d1-5180-493e-b940-8f55c5cd64dc

    Aleut Conversation Corpus
  • MIDDLE CHULYM, ÖS GREGORY ANDERSON, DAVID HARRISON

    DOCUMENTATION OF ÖS: A TURKIC LANGUAGE OF SIBERIA
    The Siberian Turkic language known to its speakers as Ös (the name they also call themselves and the river which they live along) is known to science as "Middle Chulym." Both the language and its people have been historically misidentified, misclassified and grouped together with neighbouring peoples from whom they are distinct. Now moribund with fewer than 50 speakers (all over the age of 50), Ös remains only minimally documented, and has not been recorded previously in any digital medium.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c6029739-f011-4982-b50a-8dc9dcf720ca

    Documentation of Ös: A Turkic Language of Siberia
  • SCOTS CHRISTINA LORIMER

    THE NEW TESTAMENT IN SCOTS
    This is a deposit of recordings of the New Testament in Scots, a translation from the Greek by William Laughton Lorimer (1885-1967).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cde46566-8df4-4aa5-8540-83bc0636623e

  • EUSHTA-CHAT ANDREY FILCHENKO, VALERIA LEMSKAYA

    COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION AND ARCHIVING OF EUSHTA-CHAT
    Documenting Eushta-Chat, a critically endangered Turkic language native to South-Western Siberia in Russia, with descriptive, comparative, typological and areal studies, as well as analysis of the degree of language endangerment, the language’s functional spheres and the sociolinguistic makeup of the communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b93b010c-2de3-49ae-a563-458794056fd3

  • MICHIF OLIVIA SAMMONS

    DOCUMENTING MICHIF VARIATION
    Michif, the language of the Métis, is a contact language integrating French and Algonquian (Cree, Ojibwe) elements. Varieties are found in Canada (Manitoba, Alberta, Saskatchewan) and the United States (North Dakota, Montana). With no comprehensive grammar of any variety and fewer than 1,000 elderly speakers, Michif is both under-described and highly endangered. Previous studies have primarily focused on varieties spoken in Manitoba, while neglecting those found elsewhere. In collaboration with Métis community members across western Canada, this project aims to provide a more comprehensive and permanent record in the form of a culturally and scientifically relevant corpus of spoken Michif
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2fb4ea10-dc24-4d2d-89a0-caa0c462292c

    Documenting Michif Variation
  • MELETS CHULYM ANDREY FILCHENKO, VALERIA LEMSKAYA

    COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION AND ARCHIVING OF MELETS CHULYM
    Documenting Melets Chulym, a critically endangered Turkic language native to South-Western Siberia in Russia, with descriptive, comparative, typological and areal studies, as well as analysis of the degree of language endangerment, the language’s functional spheres and the sociolinguistic makeup of the communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/749a27ee-c020-46a8-8f2c-4e7acbea536d

  • EASTERN KHANTY, SOUTHERN SELKUP ANDREY FILCHENKO, BALTHASAR BICKEL, NATALIA MAKSIMOVA

    COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF TWO ENDANGERED SIBERIAN LANGUAGES: EASTERN KHANTY AND SOUTHERN SELKUP
    The languages of the collection, Eastern Khanty and Southern Selkup, (i) are severely endangered: each numbers under 20 last proficient speakers; (ii) have existing legacy data in Tomsk with limited access, which is to be improved as a result of the project; (iii) are characterized by areal contact contiguity; (iv) are ethnographically consistent, with the last traditional culture practitioners. The cooperative project between the University of Zurich and Tomsk State Pedagogical University builds on extended research experience with the respective languages, and relevant documentation methodology. The project pursues documentation and analysis of two endangered languages of Western Siberia, Russia in order to gain insight into local processes of area formation.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/25344716-bd77-43d2-930f-dc2ddaaa96ed

    Comprehensive Documentation and Analysis of Two Endangered Siberian Languages: Eastern Khanty and Southern Selkup
  • EASTERN KHANTY ANDREY FILCHENKO

    MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTATION OF THE ENDANGERED VASYUGAN AND ALEXANDROVO KHANTY DIALECTS OF TOMSK REGION IN SIBERIA
    This is a collection of audio and video language data of two related endangered dialects of Khanty, spoken in the Tomsk region of Russia: Vasyugan and Alexandrovo (under 100 speakers). Khanty is a group of dialect clusters, which, together with Mansi, forms the Ob’-Ugric subgroup of the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic family. The texts have been narrated by male and female Khanty speakers, with transcriptions and translations into Russian, along with English glosses and free translations added later. These texts were recorded in 2007 in the upper and lower Vasyugan river areas, and in the Alexandrovo Ob’ river Khanty communities, and include monologues, dialogues, autobiographical narratives, jokes, brief exchanges, humorous songs, and stories from village life.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/20ef6f40-ded0-447e-bba0-03413d4e49fe

    Multimedia documentation of the endangered Vasyugan and Alexandrovo Khanty dialects of Tomsk region in Siberia
  • KORYAK ERICH KASTEN

    KORYAK LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
    From 2000 until 2014, Erich Kasten and his local research partners had recorded Koryak, Even and Itelmen texts in Kamchatka. These were meant at the outset to investigate anthropological research questions and, at the given time, without the purpose to create a well-structured language repository. Over the years however, the text corpus has aggregated up to 119 hours local language recordings on video tapes. With this project the documented precious and often unique language data will be made discoverable and accessible for research as well as for community use - with positive effects for the perservation of the given endangered languages on Kamchatka.
     
    Access Collection here:
    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6a876738-cfc3-4c0e-9ef9-2f9c00e15e081

    Koryak language and culture
  • INGRIAN FEDOR ROZHANSKIY, ELENA MARKUS

    DOCUMENTATION OF INGRIAN: COLLECTING AND ANALYZING FIELDWORK DATA AND DIGITIZING LEGACY MATERIALS
    The project was carried out in 2011-2013 by Fedor Rozhanskiy and Elena Markus. The work was focused on documentation of the Ingrian language and other Finnic varieties spoken in the Leningrad Oblast of the Russian Federation (first of all, Votic and Ingrian Finnish). The collection provides 1) new data recorded in the course of the project from contemporary native speakers using high-quality audio and video equipment; 2) legacy materials collected by previous researchers. The resulting deposit comprises about 510 hours of audio recordings and 21 hours of video. Each recording is provided with a detailed metadata file specifying the sociolinguistic background of the speaker, the history of the recording, and its contents.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f6dd4b87-91d0-4c6b-a9fb-18b07c7114fe

    Documentation of Ingrian: Collecting and analyzing fieldwork data and digitizing legacy materials
  • BAFUT AYUNWI NEBA

    DOCUMENTING THE BAFUT (GRASSFIELDS BANTU, CAMEROON) ROYAL HONORIFIC SYSTEM
    The Bafut Royal Honorific System is one of several registers used by Bafut speakers when addressing members of the various traditional administrative structures. The various honorific systems differ depending on who is the speaker, whom the speakers talk about and the purpose of speech. The collection includes recordings of songs, their performance and other activities in which royal honorifics are used in both speech and gesture. Recordings include different versions of the Bafut National Anthem (Mban), now sung and performed by a very limited few.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/b7c0169d-a462-4fae-8a4f-2470b5ab586b

  • BABANKI PIUS AKUMBU

    MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTATION OF BABANKI RITUAL SPEECH
    Babanki is an endangered Grassfields language spoken in Babanki Tungo and Big Babanki, northwest of Cameroon. The language of rituals contains poetic forms, lexical items and grammatical structures not found in everyday Babanki speech. Unfortunately, these special speech forms are threatened by the strong influence of modernism and especially Christianity which have caused the number of people who still engage in ritual performances to drop drastically. Consequently, the Babanki cultural values inherent in the ritual performances are no longer cherished and transmitted to younger generations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/83c6065c-6e4d-422d-b8c5-60f09d663420

    Multimedia Documentation of Babanki Ritual Speech
  • VUTE ALEXANDRE FRANçOIS, GLADYS GUARISMA

    RECORDINGS OF VUTE: A BANTOID LANGUAGE OF CAMEROON
    This deposit includes mostly linguistic data (lexical, grammatical) on the Vute language (Cameroon). It also features a number of traditional stories. This collection formed the basis of the publication Guarisma (1978). Guarisma, Gladys. 1978. Études vouté, langue bantoïde du Cameroun: phonologie et alphabet pratique, synthématique, lexique vouté-français. Paris : SELAF. ISBN: 978-2-85297-040-3.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a789fcf3-042e-457f-980d-753bc3ea3415

    Recordings of Vute: A Bantoid language of Cameroon
  • BASKEET YVONNE TREIS

    DOCUMENTATION OF BASKEET SONG, VERBAL ART AND CEREMONIAL LANGUAGE
    Baskeet, is an Omotic language spoken in south-western Ethiopia. This collection aims at investigating the variation and continuity in the songs and recitations of Baskeet singers based on a documentation of lyre and flute performances as well as wedding, mourning and work songs. The collection includes videos and audios from a wide range of singers and musicians and a corpus of interviews with musicians about their biographies, learning histories and repertoires as well as the contexts in which music is performed. The collection of music-/song-related recordings is supplemented by a corpus (non-musical) narratives and elicited language material (lexicon, paradigms, example sentences).
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e7ea6d09-30e0-4637-8b54-f66e0729cf31

    Documentation of Baskeet song, verbal art and ceremonial language
  • DWANG JAMES ESSEGBEY

    DOCUMENTATION OF FISHING PRACTICES AMONG THE DWANG
    This project proposes to document practices related to fishes (including catching, processing, marketing and consumption) among the Dwang communities who inhabit the south of the Volta Lake. Dwang belongs to the northern branch of the Central Guang branch of the Kwa family. Their traditional occupations are fishing and farming, although fishing by natives practically came to halt when a hydro-electric dam was built in 1966, creating the Volta Lake, which is the world’s largest reservoir by surface area. The reasons for the decline in fishing are not clear. The people insist that they haven’t lost their expressions related fishing activities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cc44a680-febd-4c71-acba-2d5266310ae7

    Documentation of Fishing Practices Among the Dwang
  • AJUMBU , NGUN PIERPAOLO DI CARLO

    VERBAL ART, ETHNOHISTORICAL PERFORMANCES AND WELCOME RITUALS FROM NGUN AND AJUMBU
    This deposit includes materials from two speaker communities in NW Cameroon, i.e. Ngun and Ajumbu. Besides being the first documentation of these endangered languages (each village has a population below 300), this deposit is the first attempt to look at the loci of reproduction of such languages. This means that the events recorded and annotated have been selected according to their potential relevance for the reproduction of the traditional society and, hence, of its language. To make but an example, it is for this reason that in some of the videos the researcher himself is visible: ritually welcoming the stranger is, in these societies, a moment in which the whole social structure becomes well visible and is re-affirmed.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c985e8dd-2e1c-4e2f-bf6e-b7904f725be5

    Verbal art, ethnohistorical performances and welcome rituals from Ngun and Ajumbu
  • NUER TATIANA REID

    NUER, A WEST NILOTIC LANGUAGES OF SOUTH SUDAN AND ETHIOPIA
    The Nuer deposit presents data recorded between 2015-2019 with speakers of Lou Nuer – a dialect that belongs to the Eastern Nuer dialect chain. It is spoken around the Akobo town in South Sudan. The collection investigates phonetics, phonology and morphology of Nuer verbs. This is achieved through systematic elicitation of inflectional and derivational paradigms, and through elicitation of target words in various prosodic contests designed to assist with the study of tone and vowel length.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/83725b0d-b946-4e94-bc80-f7141ec121da

  • BUU RACHEL OJONG DIBA

    TOWARDS THE DOCUMENTATION OF COMMUNICATIVE PRACTICES IN BUU: A PILOT PROJECT
    Buu is a language spoken by no more than 200 people in Lower Fungom, one of the linguistically most diverse micro-areas of sub-Saharan Africa. This project aims to document Buu from the perspective of the actual communicative practices observed in the village by focusing on three different contexts. This is expected to not only allow me to document, albeit initially, Buu as a distinct language, but also to provide an opportunity to develop best practices to integrate ancestral-code and communicative-practices modes of documentation in one and the same project.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ee7f7b5d-cd79-4db9-8af3-2f98a2e7b674

    Towards the documentation of communicative practices in Buu: a pilot project
  • UBANG ADEMOLA LEWIS

    DOCUMENTATION OF UBANG GENDER DIGLOSSIA
    This collection is the outcome of a language documentation project on Ubang, a Cross River Bendi language spoken by 11,100 people in Obudu, Cross-River State, Nigeria (SIL, 2013). Ubang show gender-based diglossia whereby females and males use different words to refer to the same basic concept and thing. Ubang is endangered because of the diminishing number of speakers due to occupational emigration and language contact and because of gender diglossia is not passed on to the next generation as vigorously as it used to be. This collection aims to document Ubang's disappearing natural diglossic conversations, folktales and cultural rites of passage.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f58c8dde-cda3-4f8e-8369-2b74b5f1a988

  • WAWA, VUTE HEATHER TODD

    DOCUMENTING VUTE ETHNOBIOLOGICAL INVENTORIES
    Wawa is a Mambiloid language spoken in the Adamawa Region of Cameroon. This project will focus on one of its four dialects, Mbenguedje, and aims to document ethnobiological inventories of the Mbenguedje Wawa and analyse lexical variation. With less than 500 speakers, Mbenguedje Wawa are shifting to other local languages and few children are competent in the language. The analysis of lexical variation will consider sociolinguistic factors and follow a social network approach to describe and investigate the multilingual, intense-contact setting.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/846766e7-e222-4f49-ac35-17796dc1a4ef

  • CôTE D'IVOIRE SIGN LANGUAGES ANGOUA TANO

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SIGN LANGUAGE IN CôTE D’IVOIRE
    Like in several countries in West Africa, at least two sign languages are used in Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast). American Sign Language (ASL) is used in Deaf education and by educated Deaf adults. Deaf people with no formal schooling use various forms of Ivorian Sign Language. ASL is spreading in the Ivorian Deaf community at the cost of Ivorian Sign Language or Langue des Signes de Côte d’Ivoire (LSCI). This collection consists of documentation and analysis of LSCI, including a digital corpus that features a representative sample of signed discourse, a lexical database and a description and analysis of selected features of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6357f1b9-8c02-4277-870b-6736b5611434

    Documentation and description of sign language in Côte d’Ivoire
  • AVATIME SASKIA VAN PUTTEN, REBECCA DEFINA

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF AVATIME
    Avatime belongs to a group of languages called Togo Remnant, Central Togo or preferably Ghana-Togo Mountain (GTM). Avatime is spoken in seven villages in the Volta Region of Ghana by 24,000 speakers (Gordon 2005) and is bordered to the west by Tafi and Nyangbo, to the north by Logba and to the east and south by Ewe. Ewe is the dominant language in the region. Most Avatime speakers also speak Ewe and English. This deposit includes video and audio recordings of spoken Avatime. The recordings are of various genres such as ceremonial events, personal stories, route descriptions, folk tales, conversations, recipes and speech elicited using various materials.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/03aac379-8841-4b41-beb7-2ea35deeed3b

    Description and Documentation of Avatime
  • PINGILAPESE RYOKO HATTORI

    PINGELAPESE LANGUAGE DATA
    Pingilapese or Pingelpaese is a language spoken by approximately 2,000 people, mainly on Pingilap atoll and the high island of Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). The deposit consists of audio, visual, text, translation and larger written files, including folk stories, accounts of customs, a recent history, songs, games, and traditional activities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/43998b5f-c786-4e25-8177-7af6c06a0d5a

    Pingelapese language data
  • IKPáNA (LOGBA) LYDIA CEDAR GREEN

    IKPáNA (LOGBA) PLANTS: NAMES AND USES
    This is a collection of video recordings of speakers of Ikpána describing the names and usages of various plants found in the Logba Traditional Area, Ghana. All recordings were made during twelve days of fieldwork in November 2009 as part of an Independent Study Project during Lydia Green’s undergraduate semester abroad.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1cc0c577-bdaa-4ace-978a-6a844356584f

    Ikpána (Logba) plants: names and uses
  • GURAFERDAN SHEKO ANNE-CHRISTIE HELLENTHAL

    GURAFERDAN SHEKO: LINGUISTIC TREASURES OF A FORGOTTEN DIALECT
    The variety of Sheko spoken by an estimated nine thousand people in Guraferda, southwestern Ethiopia, differs drastically from the main variety. However, an influx of settlers with a dominant language and culture accelerates changes in language use. This project documents some of the socio-linguistic context of Guraferdan Sheko and its endangered genres of speech, especially gozha ‘song of praise’. The collection also shows some of the material culture of the Sheko, especially their beehives. The annotated texts can be used to investigate clause type marking, a typologically salient aspect of Omotic languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2ce81917-51bf-492e-8a8c-3f55e94509db

    Guraferdan Sheko: linguistic treasures of a forgotten dialect
  • VOGUL GABOR SZEKELY

    LINGUISTIC FIELDWORK IN NORTHERN-URAL: A COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF UPPER-LOZVA MANSI LANGUAGE
    This deposit consists of audio recordings of 10 speakers of Mansi, or Vogul, spoken in Ivdel, North-West Siberia, resulting from fieldwork conducted between November 2005 and April 2006. The Mansi language (in scientific literature Vogul) belongs to the Ugrian branch of the Finno-Ugrian language family, together with the Magyar (Hungarian) and Khanty (Ostyak) languages.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cd8c4b37-64e2-4eb6-a599-49b747052e07

    Linguistic Fieldwork in Northern-Ural: A Comprehensive Documentation and Description of Upper-Lozva Mansi Language
  • KORYAK ALEXANDER KING

    KORYAK ETHNOPOETICS: STORIES FROM HERDERS AND MARITIME VILLAGERS
    This collection contains documentation on two varieties of Koryak in Kamchatka, Russia, ignored by contemporary linguists. We capture a variety of genres, including conversation, songs, riddles & sayings, and descriptions of ritual and cosmology, but most of the material will be narratives. Transcriptions include grammatical and ethnographic annotations for each genre, and we aim to analyze all of the narratives following Dell Hymes’s method of ‘measured verse’, demonstrating the value of taking such analysis to a wide array of narratives, from myth to oral history to other kinds of stories.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c21fef80-eeac-4b62-a9b7-f2f28abc6545

    Koryak Ethnopoetics: Stories from Herders and Maritime Villagers
  • INUIT SIGN LANGUAGE JOKE SCHUIT

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF INUIT SIGN LANGUAGE
    Inuit Sign Language (abbreviated to ISL) is the language used by deaf Inuit of Nunavut, Canada. It has probably evolved from hunting and gathering signs used in Inuit culture. Only 1/3 of the deaf Inuit community use the native sign language; the others use a form of Manually Coded English or American Sign Language. Three communities where deaf Inuit live are included in the documentation, namely Rankin Inlet, Baker Lake and Taloyoak. The video files in this collection contain stories of past and present life of deaf Inuit community members interviewed, as well as some elicitation tasks based on picture drawings and/or cartoon clips. The content of the collection is further described in attached documents and/or annotation files.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/d007bcf2-4190-4d64-9069-76685a4ff9e6

  • CHUKCHI ERICH KASTEN

    DOCUMENTING CHUKCHI LANGUAGE: NARRATIVES AND POSSIBLE IMPULSES ON LOCAL ART TRADITIONS
    The Chukchi language is considered to be endangered. This project will document approximately 20 hrs of Chukchi narratives that they can be easily used for later linguistic analysis, as well as for practical learning tools to sustain the Chukchi language in local communities. Previous fieldwork has shown that the transmission of Chukchi language to the youth can be made attractive to them, if this is carried out in combination with local art traditions. Therefore, particular attention will be given how motives of tales are expressed in local art work, such as in the specific Chukchi tradition of carving in walrus tusk.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/703d3329-379d-4c0d-b91f-d536401f3707

  • DENE INGEBORG FINK

    DENE NARRATIVES – LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION IN DELINE, NWT, CANADA
    Dene, also sometimes referred to as North Slavey, is a Northern Athapaskan language spoken in the Mackenzie District, along the middle Mackenzie River from Fort Norman north, around Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories, and in the Mackenzie Mountains in the communities of Déline, Fort Good Hope, Tulita, Colville Lake, and Norman Wells. This collection contains audio and video recordings of spoken Dene, as well as a few transcription files and translations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/34e66772-695b-4996-8d53-655978059e5c

  • PITE SAAMI JOSHUA WILBUR

    THE PITE SAAMI DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    The Pite Saami language, also known as Arjeplog Saami, is spoken by around 30 mostly elderly speakers from the Arjeplog municipality in Swedish Lapland. Due to the dominance of Swedish language, culture and politics in most aspects of everyday life, the Pite Saami language as well as traditional Pite Saami realms of experience are highly endangered. The documentation currently consists of 15 collections of materials, each one including audio and video files, transcriptions and metadata, resulting from fieldwork conducted in Sweden beginning in July 2008.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/63f877b1-ab03-4e94-9678-d0b39c893bda

    The Pite Saami Documentation Project
  • TUNDRA NENETS IRINA NIKOLAEVA

    TUNDRA NENETS TEXTS
    Tundra Nenets belongs to the Samoyed branch of the Uralic language family. It is spoken by approximately 25,000 people in Arctic Russia and north-western Siberia. This deposit includes audio recordings of elderly speakers talking about their own personal history, including aspects of traditional herding lifestyle, plus a number of folktales and entertaining stories.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/8fde9b7d-ac10-4464-a083-e585a86a8d1f

    Tundra Nenets texts
  • INARI SAAMI IDA TOIVONEN

    INARI SAAMI LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION
    The data consists of elicitation sessions with a number of informants. There are three primary informants. Much of the material is elicitation, i.e., “how do you say X in Inari Saami”. However, there are also some Q&A sessions in Inari Saami, some conversations among Saami speakers, some songs and stories, etc.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/37fd5920-2d07-4ec1-9b5d-f343f6c8f41a

  • ENETS BERNARD COMRIE, OLGA KHANINA

    DOCUMENTATION OF ENETS: DIGITIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF LEGACY FIELD MATERIALS AND FIELDWORK WITH LAST SPEAKERS
    The project includes documentation of Enets, an almost extinct Northern Samoyedic language spoken on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia. The collection includes digitized legacy materials (manuscripts and tapes) of Soviet researchers of the 1930s-1990s and their analysis in the field, as well as documentation material based on fieldwork with the last speakers, documenting the phonology and morphology of modern Enets. By documenting Enets at two temporal stages, the researchers hope that they will be able to track the structural changes attested in the language of the last speakers.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2ba72231-3642-4895-a0b5-986acc8c9c8f

    Documentation of Enets: digitization and analysis of legacy field materials and fieldwork with last speakers
  • NKAMI ROGERS KROBEA ASANTE

    DOCUMENTATION OF NKAMI
    Nkami is a South-Guang (Kwa, Niger-Congo) language, spoken by about 400 people in Amankwa, a resettlement community, in the the Afram Plains of the Eastern Region of Ghana, West Africa. The data were collected by Rogers Krobea Asante, linguist and principal investigator, team members, Enoch Kwadwo Akuamoah Botwe and Hayford Opreko (Ketewa), and some of the community members themselves. The deposit includes several hours of video and audio data covering varied aspects of the everyday life of the Nkami people, ELAN files, metadata on the data in CMDI-Maker, a dictionary, ethnic and language maps, population and language survey, one PhD dissertation and several peer-reviewed journal articles on the grammar of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/580f2588-85fd-4079-ba08-b5e89150f68c

    Documentation of Nkami
  • EHUEUN KOMOLAFE OLUWAKAYODE

    DOCUMENTATION OF EHUEUN LANGUAGE AND RIVER WORSHIP
    Ehueun, an Akoko-Edo, Edoid language is spoken by less than 14,000 Epinmi natives in Ondo, Nigeria (SIL, 2000). Though of rich cultural and linguistic relevance, the extinction of Ehueun is imminent as its few speakers are vigorously shifting to Yoruba and many have urban-migrated. The language has an exquisite sound system with voiceless approximants and plosive-nasal alternation. Its speakers worship Okute, the river goddess,via a guild of seven bands of masquerades, mediated by the aged.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e097c933-b6b9-48f1-bb53-d2529e3a7e89

    Documentation of Ehueun Language and River Worship
  • ANIMERE JAMES ESSEGBY, BRIAN GELLES

    DOCUMENTION OF ANIMERE, GHANA (KWA, NIGER-CONGO): A PILOT STUDY
    Animere (ISO 639-3: anf) is a critically endangered Ghana-Togo Mountain language (Kwa, Niger-Congo) spoken north of the Volta Region, Ghana. A recent sociolinguistic survey of the language estimated that there were less than 30 speakers and that all but three of these speakers are over 40 years old. This project aims to provide a sample documentation and establish the feasibility of engaging in a full-scale language documentation of Animere. This project will also produce a thematic dictionary and a collection of varied naturally-occurring speech events in audio-visual format.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fbd23548-859b-426d-9e96-72173f0804a6

    Documention of Animere, Ghana (Kwa, Niger-Congo): A Pilot Study
  • SHERBRO TUCKER CHILDS, JEDD SCHROCK

    DOCUMENTING THE SHERBRO LANGUAGE AND CULTURE OF SIERRA LEONE
    The Sherbro language, spoken on Sherbro Island and nearby coastal areas of Sierra Leone, is in rapid decline. Its speakers now number some 20,000 with its domains and functions decreasing. Sherbro speakers increasingly prefer the more widely spoken languages Mende, Krio, and Temne. In a few places, however, the language is used in daily interactions. One is within the Dema Chiefdom on the westernmost edge of the island. It is here the project will locate itself to fully document the language in grounded contexts and partner with the local community and university to produce materials valuable to these and scholarly communities.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/367eab36-a48b-434d-977d-7bf8e8851f66

    Documenting the Sherbro language and culture of Sierra Leone
  • IKAAN SOPHIE SALFFNER

    FARMING, FOOD AND YAM: LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL PRACTICES AMONG IKAAN SPEAKERS
    Ikaan, a dialect of Ukaan, is spoken in two villages in south-western Nigeria. This collection investigates phonetic and phonological variation among speakers based on a documentation of language around, knowledge of and practices in food, food production and farming, with a special focus on the New Yam Festival.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/36e3cad7-83cd-4260-ade9-1ccc64a918c0

    Farming, food and yam: language and cultural practices among Ikaan speakers
  • IKAAN, UKAAN SOPHIE SALFFNER

    IKAAN AND RELATED DIALECTS OF UKAAN
    The Ikaan language documentation project focuses on the Ikaan language spoken in Ikakumo, Ondo State, Nigeria, but also includes materials on the other lects of Ikaan spoken in Ise, Auga and Ayanran as well as the Ikakumo village in Edo State. The collection intends to serve the needs of the language community as well as academic researchers. The documentation therefore includes resources that are more likely to be of interest to the speakers of Ikaan, such as proverbs and stories, as well as resources that are more likely to be of interest to linguists, such as investigations into the tone system and the numeral system of the language.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/eaacb80f-8877-4cea-8573-63c9f526393b

    Ikaan and related dialects of Ukaan
  • ÀBèSàBèSì JONAS LAU

    DOCUMENTING ÀBèSàBèSì
    Abesabesi - often referred to as Akpes in literature - is a minority language spoken by approximately 7,000 people in South-Western Nigeria. A gradual shift towards the regional lingua franca Yoruba is favored by rapid urbanization and unfavorable language attitudes. This project was based in a town called Ikaram (Ondo State) to document the language and create an audio-visual corpus with time-aligned transcriptions. The corpus feeds into a digital reference grammar of the Abesabesi language. The grammar with an integrated dictionary is accessible at http://abesabesi.cceh.uni-koeln.de/
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a6371e17-d083-4e29-bc4a-ecb9303f9197

    Documenting Àbèsàbèsì
  • PANARE NATALIA CáCERES ARANDIA

    A COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION OF PANARE, A CARIBAN LANGUAGE OF VENEZUELA
    Panare is a Cariban language spoken by most individuals in a group of 4,700 people who live in small villages scattered along the Guaniamo and Cuchivero river basins in Venezuela. This project aims at compiling a modern documentary corpus in collaboration with members of the community representing different variants of the language. It will involve the collection, annotation and archiving of new audiovisual recordings of a variety of speech genres and culturally important activities, in addition to the annotation of heritage materials collected mainly during the 1970s and 1980s, the training of community documenters, and a digital dictionary.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/f4bd5da6-c40d-44e8-a192-79a353ec70eb

    A comprehensive documentation of Panare, a Cariban language of Venezuela
  • AYERE (UWU) ANJA MOEMEKE-CHOON

    DOCUMENTATION OF UWU (AYERE), AN ENDANGERED AND UNDOCUMENTED MINORITY LANGUAGE OF THE NIGERIAN MIDDLE BELT
    Uwu is a Volta-Niger language of the Niger-Congo language family spoken in a single town in the linguistically highly diverse Nigerian Middle Belt. Uwu means ‘there is space’, which in Yorruba is translated as Ayere. Thus, in the literature Uwu has been overwhelmingly called Ayere. The audio recordings in this deposit were collected between 2007 and 2010 by mainly Anja Choon. A few recordings are by Yun-Hsin Chang and one recording by Sophie Salffner.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c4b8ce17-cdb9-4c5d-ae09-9b393fef6cdf

  • GURENE SAMUEL ATINTONO

    A DOCUMENTATION OF GURENE FOLK TALES, RIDDLES, SONGS, PALACE GENRES AND OTHER ORAL GENRES IN BOLGA
    This project documents oral genres in the Bolgatanga dialect (Bolne) of Gurene (the depositor’s native language). Gurene is a Gur language of northern Ghana, and the Bolne dialect is spoken in the regional capital of the Upper East region of Ghana, Bolgatanga and a few surrounding villages. This project contains video and audio recordings documenting the rich traditional heritage of folktales and sung folktales in Gurene, including documentation of traditional rituals, including marriage and funeral rites and important cultural events, such as the installation of a new Chief.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/0b476a47-7d3e-46cd-963c-6efc7f93167e

    A documentation of Gurene folk tales, riddles, songs, palace genres and other oral genres in Bolga
  • BOGON ULRICH KLEINEWILLINGHöFER

    DOCUMENTATION OF THE BOGON (CALA) LANGUAGE
    BogoN is a Gur language spoken by the Chala people in Ghana, a minority group living mainly to the east of the Oti river in the northern part of the Volta Region. The language is poorly documented and severely threatened with extinction, and fluent BogoN speakers probably number only several hundred. This deposit consists of recordings with transcriptions, including recordings about the taboos of the BogoN, stories and proverbs, and the settlement of a dispute regarding clan history.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/89ba15ff-7f19-4be9-b926-7208c1903f28

    Documentation of the BOGON (Cala) language
  • KAM JAKOB LESAGE

    DOCUMENTION OF KAM: NATURAL INTERACTION, MULTIMODALITY, AND COMMUNITY-DRIVEN ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION
    Kam is a high-level Niger-Congo isolate, spoken by a community of mountain dwelling farmer-fishermen in Central-eastern Nigeria (ca. 8,000-11,000 speakers). This project has two aims. The first is to establish a corpus of language use in natural interaction, including multimodal communication, while exploring the role sand may play in speakers' gesture space. The second is to document ethnographically interesting texts and performances, focusing on traditional knowledge speakers wish to preserve. Throughout, but especially for the second aim of the project, it will rely on extensive collaboration with speakers from different generations, to strengthen the intergenerational transmission of such knowledge.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/00-0000-0000-0012-80DE-C

    Documention of Kam: Natural interaction, multimodality, and community-driven ethnographic documentation
  • OPUUO MELLESE GELANEH ALEMU

    DOCUMENTATION OF OPUUO
    Opuuo (Shita) is a critically endangered language from the Koman family of the Nilo-Saharan phylum. This language is spoken in the western border region of Ethiopia around the Gambela region and Ethio-South Sudan Border. It has 1,750 native speakers, with only 999 living in Gambella Region. Other speakers are distributed throughout the country. The main objective of this collection is to document and describe the grammar of Opuuo. The deposit contains: a sociolinguistic assessment of the language in Ethiopia; audio, video and annotated texts; and a description of the grammar of Opuuo.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/fd2fea93-6102-44b2-93a5-12eb0a66b6fc

    Documentation of Opuuo
  • SOMYEV, SOMYEV BRUCE CONNELL

    SOMYEV (SOMB; KGT) SEGMENTAL AND TONAL CONTRASTS
    This deposit consists of annotated audio recordings of two speakers of Somyev, spoken in Taraba State, Nigeria, resulting from fieldwork conducted during April 2006. Somyev is a severely endangered language spoken in the village of Kila Yang on the Mambila Plateau. It is provisionally classified as part of the Mambiloid sub-group, itself considered part of Bantoid, and therefore as belonging the Benue-Congo branch of Niger-Congo.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2719919f-1fef-44e3-8384-1c4e7e643fd0

    Somyev (Somb; KGT) Segmental and Tonal Contrasts
  • SEKPELE CEPHAS DELALORM

    DESCRIPTION AND DOCUMENTATION OF SEKPELE
    This collection includes data on the Sekpele language, in order to provide linguistic analysis, description and documentation. Sekpele is a language spoken primarily by ten Likpe communities north-east of Hohoe (the district capital, which is an Ewe community) in the central Volta Region of Ghana with an estimated population of 25,000. Sekpele is one of the fourteen Ghana Togo Mountain (GTM) languages that are under-documented. The deposit includes audio/video recordings and written text as well as data on which a Sekpele grammar and the depositor’s PhD thesis is based.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bcee74a6-f967-4dcd-8308-94873508362a

  • NAWURI MARY ESTHER DAKUBU

    VANISHING VOICES FROM GHANA’S ‘MIDDLE BELT’
    The project documents endangered cultural and linguistic practices in two cult languages still used in the Nawuri-speaking Balai community. The Kiliji language is used almost exclusively by women, in the context of a cult know popularly as Okule and more accurately as Ojo Aliji. It is identifiable as a variety of Yoruba. The other is an archaic variety of the Nawuri language used by the indigenous founder clan of Balai, also known as Balai, exclusively in prayers. This clan is known for iron working and still practices it, using traditional methods. The Ojo Aliji cult is highly endangered in the medium run, since no new members are being recruited. The Balai clan language is a relic of the language as spoken before the arrival of incomers. Although they still practice iron working the methods are changing. Information was also collected on pottery making as it was formerly (but is no longer) practiced by Balai women.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ecb6efab-a6c1-457f-a0fe-9a295533d92d

    Vanishing Voices from Ghana’s ‘middle belt’
  • SRI LANKA PORTUGUESE HUGO CARDOSO

    DOCUMENTATION OF SRI LANKA PORTUGUESE
    Sri Lanka Portuguese is a Portuguese-lexified creole formed in the 16th century. Although once an important language of the island, it is now much reduced and rapidly contracting. It is spoken by the "Portuguese Burghers" of Eastern Sri Lanka, in and around the towns of Batticaloa and Trincomalee, in which Tamil is the dominant language. This project will document the language of the community as used in various different domains and its unique song, music and dance traditions, which constitute one of its most recognisable cultural features and had a deep impact on Sri Lankan culture as a whole.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a542c4b1-8c36-4fd5-ae43-e777f87f5983

    Documentation of Sri Lanka Portuguese
  • KIM, BOM TUCKER CHILDS

    DOCUMENTATION OF KIM AND BOM LANGUAGES OF SIERRE LEONE (DKB)
    This project documents two dying languages spoken in the coastal tidelands of south-eastern Sierra Leone. Only a few speakers use Kim (Krim) while only a few more know Bom; all are bilingual in Mende, the dominant language ion the area. The languages survive only in the remaining speakers’ memories since the languages are no longer spoken on an everyday basis. Documentation of the language and culture is achieved by means of multiple media, performed collaboratively with the Kim and Bom people themselves.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6d7b0be6-21c0-48fe-9490-0b8d7dd3b860

    Documentation of Kim and Bom Languages of Sierre Leone (DKB)
  • GOEMAI BIRGIT HELLWIG

    GOEMAI TEXTS
    Goemai language is a West Chadic language spoken in the Great Muri Plains of Plateau State, Central Nigeria. It is estimated that the Goemai community has 150,000 members, but the number of actual speakers is assumed to be less than a third of that. The Goemai language is threatened by the growth of the regional lingua franca Hausa, and transmission of Goemai to younger generations is limited. This collection includes an annotated corpus of approximately 80 texts with transcriptions, annotations and English translations, as well as information regarding dialectal variation. The text corpus contains recordings across a variety of genres and cultural contexts. All recordings are annotated (providing transcriptions, grammatical information and translations), and the annotations are linked to the time axis of digitised audio or video files. Furthermore, all data is accompanied by metadata descriptions so as to make the structure of the corpus transparent to all interested parties.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/4bf05980-7e71-4efb-b6d1-18713b8fcb02

    Goemai Texts
  • SHABO KIBEBE TSEHAY

    DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE SHABO LANGUAGE: A VERY ENDANGERED ISOLATE LANGUAGE OF SOUTHWESTERN ETHIOPIA
    This collection includes documentation and description of Shabo (also called Mikeyir, Mekeyer), a seriously endangered language of Ethiopia. Shabo is spoken by about 600 people around the Sheka Forest in southwestern Ethiopia. The language is still used in some of the daily life domains, but only a few children of the ethnic group are acquiring it as their mother tongue.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/56cbb48b-bbaa-44b2-9ac8-05e4bb748e02

  • KUNA WIKALILER SMITH

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF KUNA: A COMMUNITY-BASED APPROACH TO DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMAR-WRITING.
    This project is a response to the limited documentation and description available to the community members of Kuna, a Chibchan language spoken mostly in the Panamanian-Colombian border area, with an estimated 44,100 speakers. This collection includes two different sets of recordings. The first are recordings made via cassette recorder in the late 1970s by Gunas who shared their personal cassettes with me. These are mostly chants, although there was also an interview of a speaker talking about his family history. The second are files in audio and video formats that were made during linguistic fieldwork in 2010 and 2011.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/bb23a8f2-a3d3-44d2-ba37-42b9745dd3de

    Documentation and description of Kuna: a community-based approach to documentation and grammar-writing.
  • SITI JONATHAN BRINDLE

    KYITU (SITI) LANGUAGE ARCHIVE
    This collection includes a basic description and documentation of Siti - an endangered language of Côte d’Ivoire - which was claimed in 1981 to be spoken by 31 individuals. This deposit consists of audio recordings, images of speakers, maps of Vonkoro (the village where Siti is spoken), and documents, resulting from fieldwork conducted in three periods between January 2012 and April 2012.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/9bc274c0-45c6-42ce-9eed-5683ed105746

    Kyitu (Siti) Language Archive
  • BASTIMENTOS CREOLE ENGLISH HEIDI REID

    TENSE, ASPECT, AND MODALITY IN BASTIMENTOS CREOLE ENGLISH
    This project aims, on the one hand, to compile a rich set of digitally recorded speech acts (audio and video), as well as texts and stills, reflecting sociocultural life typical of the 600 speakers of the Creole community of Bastimentos Island, Panama, Central America, whilst on the other hand, to provide a sketch grammar with an in-depth descriptive analysis of TMA markers and their permissible combinations, accounting for syntactic variables, sociolinguistic variation, pragmatic/stylistic information, and possible internal change independent of the creole continuum.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/52f93f84-a704-4fbb-96d0-7831b6053975

    Tense, Aspect, and Modality in Bastimentos Creole English
  • LEN-MAMBILA OGUNSOLA BUKUNMI

    DOCUMENTATION OF LEN-MAMBILA
    Len– Mambila (ISO 639-3 mzk) is a North-Bantoid language spoken in Bang, Taraba, Nigeria. It is a minority member of a continuum of languages with diminishing speakers (totaling 100,000) in pockets of remote villages. Due to war, migration and Fulani nomadic influence, Len speakers are shifting to Fulfulde, resulting in a progressive loss of cultural and linguistic heritage. Save for their use of fricative vowels, little is known about Len language and culture; and they do practice and exquisite but under-reported sister-exchange-marriage system. Hence, this project will holistically capture and archive linguistic and anthropological aspects of Len-Mambila for continuing scholarship.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/a3bb258a-6738-43dd-9090-a0ee1853d399

    Documentation of Len-Mambila
  • KOMO TESFAYE NEGASH

    DOCUMENTATION AND GRAMMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF KOMO
    This collection provides an audio-visual corpus of oral genres of Komo (ISO639-3:xom), a Nilo-Saharan language in Ethiopia and Sudan spoken by about 11,000 people. People’s movement due to resettlement programs, instability, and contact with dominant languages is leading the loss of oral genres such as folktales, riddles, and other linguistic resources. The collection will serve the community to re-energise and maintain the use of these genres in the socialisation of children as well as serve as a resource for linguistic research.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/aea4a5cb-70e3-47e1-8d7e-d9514e8d4d0b

  • PALAWAN CHARLES MACDONALD

    PALAWAN-TAGALOG-ENGLISH DICTIONARY
    This deposit consists of the first ever dictionary of Palawan, a language spoken in Palawan Province, Philippines, resulting from fieldwork conducted between July 2008 and March 2009. Materials include a Palawan-Tagalog-English lexicon with over 3400 entries and recordings with transcriptions and translations.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/cf5751d1-d05f-4d34-acfe-a07cf48f59c2

    Palawan-Tagalog-English Dictionary
  • NASO (TERIBE) NATALIA BERMUDEZ

    DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF PARAGUAYAN AYOREO, A LANGUAGE OF THE CHACO
    Naso (also known as Teribe) is a Chibchan language spoken in Panama, along the northern part of its border with Costa Rica, by an estimated 500 people. In this project, four teams of Naso culture specialists (verbal art, cultural traditions, botanical knowledge, and songs) will hold regular meetings to discuss and describe these different types of knowledge. These meetings will be documented and annotated by Naso technicians trained in documentation methods. The resulting ELAR archive of natural conversation, oratory, narratives, songs, and verbal art will be the basis of an Encyclopedia of Naso Culture by the Naso Language Committee.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/6ad629d0-5730-4bac-9a7d-c582ce7738a8

    Documentation and description of paraguayan Ayoreo, a language of the Chaco
  • MMANI TUCKER CHILDS

    DOCUMENTING MANI, A DISAPPEARING LANGUAGE OF SIERRA LEONE AND GUINEA
    Speakers of the Mani language today, numbering a few hundred at most, occupy scattered, remote, and isolated pockets in the Samu (spelled “Samou” in Guinea) region straddling the border on the coastal plain of Sierra Leone and Guinea. The team documented the language as it could be remembered by its old speakers from three major sites: Morebaya in Sierra Leone, N’Kompan in Guinea, and Caton and environs in Guinea. Speakers have been audio and video recorded and much of what was recorded has been transcribed. The topics included descriptions of traditional cultural practices, process descriptions of farming and fishing, the two major preoccupations of the coastal people, and personal narratives. A particularly rich vein of narrative came when speakers were asked to compare life today to what it was like when they were young.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/1c2560df-6e4d-42e4-bab0-863678b2ede7

  • KUSHI GIAN CLAUDIO BATIC

    DOCUMENTATION OF KUSHI, A CHADIC LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN NIGERIA
    The projects aims at collecting a corpus of oral texts in Kushi (639-3 kuh, kush1236), a West Chadic language spoken in Nigeria on the north-eastern fringes of the Muri mountains. The language is spoken by about 11,000 people in the so-called 'Kushi village area'. In the last few decades the areal dominance of Hausa has been deeply affecting the intergenerational transmission of the language. This project follows a description-oriented fieldwork started in 2017.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/44626cf1-cd6f-44d4-8872-2a85c675b3ed

  • KWA (BAA) MIRJAM MöLLER NWADIGO

    A DOCUMENTATION PROJECT OF BAA, A LANGUAGE OF NIGERIA
    Kwa (Baa) is an endangered minority language of eastern Nigeria, with very little previous description or documentation. The aim of this project is to create a representative corpus of primary data consisting of annotated texts (both audio and video), including interviews, conversations, songs, and narratives. A major part of this program is also the training of community members in documentation techniques. As part of a PhD project the corpus will be used as a tool in analysing the main features of the language, regarding morphosyntax and discourse.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/e050a2cd-f61d-435e-824e-93d24877bbaa

    A documentation project of Baa, a language of Nigeria
  • CICIPU STUART MCGILL

    CICIPU DOCUMENTATION
    The Western Acipa language is spoken in northwest Nigeria, in the Sakaba Local Government Area of Kebbi State. It is also known as Acipanci in Hausa, and as Cipu. Population estimates for the Acipu vary between 10-30,000. This corpus contains folktales, riddles, historical narratives, casual conversation, commentaries on festival videos, interviews, songs, prayers, and sermons, totalling approximately six hours of interlinearised time-aligned texts provided in Toolbox/ELAN format. The corpus also contains a lexicon, wordlist, and a large number of elicitation sessions.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/2a58872e-8cbd-43f7-ab85-ef55e1328e3e

    Cicipu documentation
  • KAINJI STUART MCGILL

    DOCUMENTATION OF KAINJI LANGUAGES
    This collection is the outcome of a research project surveying many the Kainji languages. For the languages included, there are recordings of wordlists, images, sociolinguistic information and electronic lexical databases. For some languages, there are also further elicitations, narratives (retellings of the fable “The North Wind and The Sun”), oral histories, and there is one recordings with songs accompanied by a drum.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/c70d865b-6acb-4f02-b23f-7f1e764d3c16

    Documentation of Kainji languages
  • SAKUN MICHAEL THOMAS

    SAKUN (SUKUR) LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION PROJECT
    This collection from the Sakun (Sukur) Language Documentation Project provides a discourse-based corpus of an endangered and undocumented language of the Mandara mountains, Nigeria. Sakun is spoken by approximately 15,000 people. Since the enlistment of Sukur in 1999 as a UNESCO Cultural Landscape, the increased contact following infrastructure development has caused Sakun to give way to Hausa in a number of domains. Working with local stakeholders, this project assembled a corpus that captures a broad range of cultural practices identified as important by the community, and provides the foundation for a grammar, dictionary and pedagogical materials to support the community’s own efforts at language maintenance.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/ea080fc9-a392-4d41-a91c-0c801bbde646

  • CABéCAR ELISABETH VERHOEVEN, NICO LEHMANN

    CAUSALITY ACROSS LANGUAGES: CABéCAR (CHIBCHAN)
    This deposit contains audio and video recordings collected from 12 Cabécar speakers as part of the Causality Across Languages project. CAL brings together an international team of researchers to investigate how speakers of different languages categorize causal chains for the purposes of describing them. It comprises four subprojects. The first of these is dedicated to the representation of causal relations in narrative discourses, with emphasis on universals and variation in underspecification and implicitness. The second subproject probes quantitatively and typologically the often hypothesized isomorphism between semantic and morphosyntactic complexity in verbal representations of causal chains. A third subproject investigates the universality of constraints on form-to-meaning mapping in descriptions of causal chains. The fourth and final subproject targets the cognitive representation of causality, searching for aspects of culture-specificity and possible linguistic reflexes.
     
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    http://hdl.handle.net/2196/3f6684ef-932f-4511-952e-ed4679b9dab1